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I'm trying to put together a generic whitelist of characters allowed in a text box which includes some but not all special characters.

So basically the user is entering a phone number and I want to limit the characters they can type to only phone numbers ( so if they tried to type 'a' then nothing would happen).

I'm using an SWT Verify Listener to accomplish what I have so far, but any of the special characters that use a SHIFT + __ combination don't work with how I've used it. I assume it's because the shift character is getting trapped.

Here is what I have

VerifyListener verify = new VerifyListener() {
    public void verifyText(VerifyEvent event) {
        event.doit = false;

        if (Character.isDigit(event.character) {
            || Character.isWhitespace(event.character)
            || event.keyCode == '.' 
            || event.keyCode == ','
            || event.keyCode == '#' //requires shift key
            || event.keyCode == '*' //requires shift key
            || event.keyCode == '/'
            || event.keyCode == '(' //requires shift key
            || event.keyCode == ')' //requires shift key
            || event.keyCode == '['
            || event.keyCode == ']'
            || event.keyCode == '-'
            || event.keyCode == SWT.ARROW_LEFT
            || event.keyCode == SWT.ARROW_RIGHT
            || event.keyCode == SWT.BS
            || event.keyCode == SWT.DEL
            || event.keyCode == SWT.MODIFIER_MASK) {

          event.doit = true;
        }
    }
};

Also, if there is a better way to do this, I would love to hear that as well.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I was an easy fix, just test against the character rather than the keycode. Any keys covered by the bitwise SWT.MODIFIER_MASK, (ctrl, alt, shift) didn't trigger the listener because the listener is called only when an intended change to the text box is seen.

Keycodes are associated with physical keys and can actually differ depending on your OS (i.e. Windows doesn't have a 'command' key).

VerifyListener verify = new VerifyListener() {
  public void verifyText(VerifyEvent event) {
    event.doit = false;

    if (Character.isDigit(event.character) {
        || Character.isWhitespace(event.character)
        || event.character == '.' 
        || event.character == ','
        || event.character == '#'
        || event.character == '*'
        || event.character == '/'
        || event.character == '('
        || event.character == ')' 
        || event.character == '['
        || event.character == ']'
        || event.character == '-'
        || event.keyCode == SWT.ARROW_LEFT
        || event.keyCode == SWT.ARROW_RIGHT
        || event.keyCode == SWT.BS
        || event.keyCode == SWT.DEL) {

      event.doit = true;
    }
  }
};
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