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Is it possible to compute several dot products without a loop? say you have the following:

a = randn(100, 3, 3)
b = randn(100, 3, 3)

I want to get an array z of shape (100, 3, 3) such that for all i

z[i, ...] == dot(a[i, ...], b[i, ...])

in other words, which verifies:

for va, vb, vz in izip(a, b, z):
    assert (vq == dot(va, vb)).all()

The straightforward solution would be:

z = array([dot(va, vb) for va, vb in zip(a, b)])

which uses an implicit loop (list comprehension + array).

Is there a more efficient way to compute z?

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1  
In Python 3.5, it'll be a @ b (unless things have changed since PEP 465). Unfortunately, dot doesn't work that way. I don't know why. –  user2357112 Jun 6 at 22:07

3 Answers 3

Try Einstein summation in numpy:

z = np.einsum('...ij,...jk->...ik', a, b)

It's elegant and does not require you to write a loop, as you requested. It gives me a factor of 4.8 speed increase on my system:

%timeit z = array([dot(va, vb) for va, vb in zip(a, b)])
1000 loops, best of 3: 454 µs per loop

%timeit z = np.einsum('...ij,...jk->...ik', a, b)
10000 loops, best of 3: 94.6 µs per loop
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np.einsum can be useful here. Try running this copy+pasteable code:

import numpy as np

a = np.random.randn(100, 3, 3)
b = np.random.randn(100, 3, 3)

z = np.einsum("ijk, ikl -> ijl", a, b)

z2 = np.array([ai.dot(bi) for ai, bi in zip(a, b)])

assert (z == z2).all()

einsum is compiled code and runs very fast, even compared to np.tensordot (which doesn't apply here exactly, but often is applicable). Here are some stats:

In [8]: %timeit z = np.einsum("ijk, ikl -> ijl", a, b)
10000 loops, best of 3: 105 us per loop


In [9]: %timeit z2 = np.array([ai.dot(bi) for ai, bi in zip(a, b)])
1000 loops, best of 3: 1.06 ms per loop
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tensordot very much applies here; simply contract over axes=[[2],[1]]. Though I suspect einsum to be faster, considering the large number of small contractions performed. tensordot is more optimized for contractions over large dimensions I believe. –  Eelco Hoogendoorn Jun 6 at 22:34
    
Eelco, summing using those axes does not give the same result as the einsum. –  Oliver W. Jun 6 at 22:57
1  
np.tensordot would do a sort of outer product, multiplying every matrix in a with every matrix in b, giving rise to 2 axes of size 100. The desired result is the diagonal of that, so np.tensordot calculates too many coefficients. –  eickenberg Jun 7 at 6:51

This solution still uses a loop, but is faster because it avoids unnecessary creation of temp arrays, by using the out arg of dot:

def dotloop(a,b):
    res = empty(a.shape)
    for ai,bi,resi in zip(a,b,res):
        np.dot(ai, bi, out = resi)
    return res

%timeit dotloop(a,b)
1000 loops, best of 3: 453 us per loop
%timeit array([dot(va, vb) for va, vb in zip(a, b)])
1000 loops, best of 3: 843 us per loop
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