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Looking for the most elegant solution to bind a button command to a ViewModel ICommand property, while allowing confirmation in the View.

What I would like to do:

  1. Only allow a user to click a button when he/she should
  2. When the button is clicked, ask a confirmation
  3. If comfirmed, do work in the ViewModel, otherwise cancel
  4. Do not break MVVM architecture

The confirmation requirement can be fulfilled by showing a messagebox from the ViewModel. However, I don't think this is the way to go. Doesn't it break MVVM? What if CanExecute depends on the state of both UI (code-behind) and ViewModel? Also, what about testability when having a messagebox pop-up from the ViewModel?

Another thing I tried is binding both OnClick (to View) and Command (to ViewModel). Although the Event is always executed before the Command, there seems to be no way to cancel the command from being executed. Also, the execution order seems to be an undocumented feature, so something that you should not rely on. Besides this, it still does not allow CanExecute to take into account View logic.

Next I came up with the following solution:

View (XAML)

<Window x:Class="WpfApplication1.MainWindow"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
    DataContext="{Binding RelativeSource={RelativeSource Self}}">
    <Grid>
        <Button Content="Do Work" Command="{Binding Path=ViewModel.SaveCommand}"/>
    </Grid>
    <SelectTemplateUserControl Visibility="Collapsed" OnTemplateSelected="SelectTemplate_OnTemplateSelected"/>
</Window>

View (Code-Behind)

public partial class MainWindow : Window
{
    private readonly MainViewModel _viewModel = new MainViewModel();

    public MainWindow()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    public MainViewModel ViewModel { get { return this._viewModel; } }    

    public ICommand SaveCommand { get { return new RelayCommand<int>(this.Save,                                 this.CanSave);} }

    private bool CanSave(int templateId)
    {
        return this._viewModel.SaveCommand.CanExecute(null);
    }

    private void Save(int templateId)
    {
        var messageBoxResult = MessageBox.Show("Do you want to overwrite?",               "Overwrite?", MessageBoxButton.OKCancel);

        if (messageBoxResult == MessageBoxResult.Cancel)
            return;

        // Call method to hide main Grid and set SelectTemplateUserControl to visible..
    }

    private void SelectTemplate_OnTemplateSelected(object sender, int templateId)
    {
        this._viewModel.SaveCommand.Execute(templateId);
    }
}

ViewModel

public class MainViewModel : ViewModelBase
{
    public ICommand SaveCommand { get { return new RelayCommand<int>(this.Save,              this.CanSave); } }

    private bool CanSave(int templateId)
    {
        // Can Save Logic, returning a bool
    }

    private void Save(int templateId)
    {
        // Save Logic....
    }
}

I think it follows the MVVM pattern nicely, it also achieves Single Responsiblity. But is this the best way of doing it? Are there other possibilities?

share|improve this question
    
Maybe that link may help you blog.magnusmontin.net/2013/06/30/… – Moez Rebai Jun 6 '14 at 23:03

The confirmation requirement can be fulfilled by showing a messagebox from the ViewModel. However, I don't think this is the way to go. Doesn't it break MVVM?

One way of preserving an MVVM style while using view-related dependencies like "MessageBox", is to encapsulate and inject them into the view-model. So, you might express the dependency by asking for an IDialogService in the constructor:

public class MainViewModel : ViewModelBase
{
    private readonly IDialogService _dialog;

    public MainViewModel(IDialogService dialog)
    {
        _dialog = dialog;
    }
}

Then you pass the implementation in from the view:

private readonly MainViewModel _viewModel = new MainViewModel(new DialogService());

The interface encapsulates whatever functionality you need, so maybe "Alert", "Confirm", etc.

public interface IDialogService
{
    bool Confirm(string message, string caption = "Confirm");
}

And implement it using MessageBox, or any other approach (and switch out a dummy implementation for unit testing):

public class DialogService : IDialogService
{
    public bool Confirm(string message, string caption)
    {
        return MessageBox.Show(message, caption, MessageBoxButton.OKCancel) == MessageBoxResult.OK;
    }
}

That way you can move all the confirmation logic from the view to the view-model, where the "Save" method would just look like this:

private void Save()
{
    if (!_dialog.Confirm("Do you want to overwrite?", "Overwrite?"))
        return;

    this.SaveCommand.Execute(null);
}

What if CanExecute depends on the state of both UI (code-behind) and ViewModel?

If you are concerned about testing, then nothing that CanExecute depends on should be in the code-behind -- you should move anything like that to the view-model.

share|improve this answer
    
Great solution, thank you. There is one scenario though where I think it is still required to add functionality from the view without influencing testability. – RB84 Jun 7 '14 at 9:51
    
Example with a fictive workflow application: 1. User has opened a document in a window 2. A button "Apply Template" should ligt up when the document is not in the "finished state", so ApplyTemplateCommand.CanExecute comes from the ViewModel 3. A messagebox pops up "Overwrite...?" 4. If the user replies Yes, the DocumentUserControl is collapsed and the SelectTemplateUserControl is shown in the Window 5. When the user selects the template, ApplyTemplateCommand.Execute(templateId) is triggered in the View. – RB84 Jun 7 '14 at 9:52
    
I can only think of my solution applying here, replacing direct calls to MessageBox with IDialogService. Is there another way to fit your solution in this case? – RB84 Jun 7 '14 at 9:52
    
@RamonBertrand so are you saying that in this scenario "ApplyEmplateCommand" would need to be in the view? I don't think I can follow your argument without more details. I would suggest updating your question making the point (or you should feel free to open a new question if this new scenario is different enough from the current question). – McGarnagle Jun 7 '14 at 17:25
    
Updated the code in order to represent my question more clearly. Didn't add the DialogService in my example because that part has already been answered. – RB84 Jun 7 '14 at 22:35

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