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Final Edit: I'm making one last edit to this question for clarity sake. I believe it has been answered in all of the comments, but in the event there is such an option, I think it's best to clean up the question for future readers.

I recently inherited someone's Perl code and there's an interesting setup and I'm wondering if it can be made more efficient.

The program is setup to use strict and warnings (as it should). The program is setup to use global variables; meaning the variables are declared and initialized to undef at the top of the program. Specific values beyond the initial undef are then assigned to the variables throughout various loops within the program. After they are set, there is a separate report section (after all internal loops and subroutines have run) that uses the variables for its content.

There are quite a few variables and it seems repetitive to just make an initial variable declaration at the top of the program so that it is available later for output/report purposes (and to stay compliant with the strict pragma). Based on my understanding and from all of the comments received thus far, it seems this is the only way to do it, as lexically scoped variables by definition only persist in during their declared scope. So, in order to make it global it needs to be declared early (i.e. at the top).

I'm just wondering if there is a shortcut to elevate the scope of a variable to be global regardless of where it's declared, and still stay within strict's parameters of course?

My previous example was confusing, so I'll write a pseudo code example here to convey the concept (I don't have the original source with me):

# Initial declaration to create "Global variables" -- imagine about 30 or so
my ($var1, $var2, $var3); # Global

# Imagine a foreach loop going through a hash and assigning values 
# to previously declared variables
for my $k (keys %h){
  ...
  $var = 1; #$var gets set to 1 within the foreach loop
  ...
}
print "The final calculated report is as follows:\n";

#output $var after loop is done later in program
print "Variable 1 comes to $var1\n"; 

So the question: is there an acceptable shortcut that declares $var1 within the foreach loop above and escalates its scope beyond the foreach loop, so it is in effect "Global"? This would avoid the need to declare and initialize it to undef at the top of the program and still make it available for use in the program's output.

Based on feedback already received the answer seems to be an emphatic "No" due to the defined scoping constraints.

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What is your question? –  TLP Jun 7 '14 at 0:39
    
Yes @secJ, it's better coding style to limit ones variables to the smallest scope possible. You'll sometimes see the style you're describing from C programmers come to perl. Additionally, one should always give variables names that self-documents the code. $var communicates nothing. However, it doesn't sound like you have a direct question that can be answered, so either you should reframe or we should close this as too broad. –  Miller Jun 7 '14 at 0:46
    
um, don't worry about the efficiency of your variable declarations at all? –  ysth Jun 7 '14 at 1:05
    
@Miller I've tried to clarify my question a bit further. I'm wondering how to make scoped variables accessible beyond the loop they're being set in. So use the foreach loop for calculations and such, but be able to call the final value in a report output later (outside of that foreach loop). –  secJ Jun 7 '14 at 1:08
2  
the answer to your new question is "no"; you must declare the variables in the scope where they will be used, not some inner scope. –  ysth Jun 7 '14 at 1:15

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

As per your own question:

So the question: is there an acceptable shortcut that declares $var1 within the foreach loop above and escalates its scope beyond the foreach loop, so it is in effect "Global"? This would avoid the need to declare and initialize it to undef at the top of the program and still make it available for use in the program's output.

You can refer to a variable name without having declared it first by using the whole name including namespace:

use strict;
use warnings;

my %h = (
    first   => 'value 1',
    second  => 'value 2',
    third   => 'value 3',
);

for my $k (keys %h) {
    print "Processing key $k...\n";
    $main::var = 1;
}

print "Variable var is now $main::var\n";

I'm assuming main as your namespace, which is the default. If your script is declaring a package, then you need to use that name. Also, if you didn't declare the variable first, you will need to use the whole package::name format everytime.

However, and just so it's clear: You don't need to "declare and initialize a variable to undef". If you do this:

my ($var1, $var2, $var3);

Those variables are already initialized to undef.

Now, you also need to understand the difference between a lexical and a global variable. Using the keyword my to declare variable at the top of your script will make them available in all the rest of your script, no matter if you are inside or outside a block. But they are not really global as they are not visible to any external module or script. If you change the keyword my to our, then they are global and visible anywhere outside that script.

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Thank you for hte response. @ikegami mentioned the use of the default package, but I did not know how those variables were accessed/set within Perl, so until now I wasn't sure that was the right way. This is exactly what I was trying to get at. Thank you for elaborating and the explanation. –  secJ Jun 8 '14 at 1:17

I'm just wondering if there is a shortcut to elevate the scope of a variable to be global regardless of where it's declared, and still stay within strict's parameters of course?

Using global variables is dumb, but possible.

use vars qw( $foo );

It still needs to be present before any uses.

share|improve this answer
    
your previous mention of the default package is what I was trying to ask about. Thanks for the effort and the help getting started. –  secJ Jun 8 '14 at 1:18

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