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my-fish-script a b c d

Say you want to get the all arguments from the second argument onwards, so b c d.

In bash you can use shift to dump the first argument and access the remaining ones with "$@".

How would you solve the problem using the fish shell?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

In fish, your arguments are contained in the $argv list. You can use list slicing to access a range of elements. So $argv[2..-1] will get you all the arguments from the second to the last (-1 is the notation for the end index).

For example

function loop --description "loop <count> <command>"
  for i in (seq 1 $argv[1])
    eval $argv[2..-1]
  end
end

Usage

$ loop 3 echo hello world
hello world
hello world
hello world
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did you just answer your own question? –  Ali Gajani Jun 7 '14 at 4:32
1  
@AliGajani I did. It's a question I had that I couldn't find the answer to on SO, so I'm adding it now to help others. In fact, SO encourages you to answer your own questions. –  Dennis Jun 7 '14 at 4:36
    
Awesome, you found the answer within 8 minutes. Quick :) –  Ali Gajani Jun 7 '14 at 4:37

You could also use read which is more readable in my opinion:

function loop
  echo $argv | read -l count command
  for i in (seq 1 $count)
    eval $command
  end
end

This works better especially when you want to use more than the first argument.

echo $argv | read -l first second rest
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You can use set -e/--erase VARIABLE_NAME to simulate the behaviour of the shift command. Erase the first argument, then get the remaining arguments from the $argv list.

For example

function loop  --description "loop <count> <command>"
  set count $argv[1]
  set --erase argv[1]
  for i in (seq 1 $count)
    eval $argv
  end
end

Usage

$ loop 3 echo hello world
hello world
hello world
hello world
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If anyone is wondering, I answered twice, because the answers are distinct. This way the community can decide which answer is better and can easily comment on the different answers. –  Dennis Jun 7 '14 at 20:20

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