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I can't understand how to get RGBA values from a short[] that I get from bufferedImage.getRaster().dataBuffer.getData() if dataBuffer is an instance of DataBufferUShort.

How to convert these values (that can be even -30000) to 0..255? If dataBuffer is an instance of DataBufferByte I can simply make something like this:

result[i] = (array[i] < 0) ?
     array[i] + 256 :
     array[i];

But what should I do with DataBufferUShort? Some PNG images has this type instead of expecting DataBufferByte.

getType() returns TYPE_CUSTOM. Here is the image: http://i.stack.imgur.com/YwmkO.png

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Are we talking about 16 bits/sample gray, or 5/5/5 or 5/6/5 bits/sample RGB? –  haraldK Jun 7 '14 at 18:23
    
The data.length is really w * h * 4, so you can convert the data as in my first example below to have byte[] argb samples. –  haraldK Jun 7 '14 at 20:11
    
Updated answer with method to get int ARGB samples. –  haraldK Jun 7 '14 at 20:18

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

A DataBufferUShort can hold multiple types of samples, so you first need to determine what data you have. Here are the most common ones:

If the image data represents 16 bit gray samples, all you need to do scale each value down to get an 8 bit gray value. You can do that by shifting the values 8 bits to the right.

DataBufferUShort dataBuffer;
short[] data = dataBuffer.getData();

byte[] gray = new byte[data.length];

for (int i = 0; i < data.length; i++) {
    gray[i] = (byte) ((data[i] & 0xff00) >> 8);
}

If the image data represents 16 bits per sample (A)RGB values, you can do just the same as above, you will just have 3 (or 4 if there's alpha) samples or array elements per pixel instead of one.

If the data represents 16 bits per sample ARGB (as seems to be the case with your sample), you can also convert to int packed ARGB samples, like this:

DataBufferUShort dataBuffer;
short[] data = dataBuffer.getData();

int[] argb = new byte[data.length / 4];

for (int i = 0; i < data.length; += 4) {
    int a = (data[i    ] & 0xff00) >> 8;
    int r = (data[i + 1] & 0xff00) >> 8;
    int g = (data[i + 2] & 0xff00) >> 8;
    int b = (data[i + 3] & 0xff00) >> 8;

    argb[i / 4] = a << 24 | r << 16 | g << 8 | b;
}

If the image data represents 15/16 bit RGB (like the TYPE_USHORT_555_RGB or TYPE_USHORT_565_RGB) you'll have to scale the RGB values up to the full 8 bit/sample range. Something like:

DataBufferUShort dataBuffer;
short[] data = dataBuffer.getData();

byte[] rgb = new byte[data.length * 3];

for (int i = 0; i < data.length; i++) {
    int shortRGB = data[i] & 0xffff;

    // Assuming 5 bit R, 5 bit G, 5 bit B, using the lower 15 bits
    rgb[i * 3 + 0] = ((((shortRGB & 0x7C00) >> 10) + 1) * 8) - 1;
    rgb[i * 3 + 1] = ((((shortRGB & 0x03E0) >>  5) + 1) * 8) - 1;
    rgb[i * 3 + 2] = ((((shortRGB & 0x001F)      ) + 1) * 8) - 1;
}

For 565 RGB or even 4444 ARGB (as used in some Android devices), the procedure is very similar.

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Data array contains 3*widthheight elements instead of widthheight. Also the image contains alpha channel so I can't understand twice why there're three items per pixel. –  Vladiator Jun 7 '14 at 19:25
    
@Vladiator Strange... Maybe you could link the image file? And also, add to your question what BufferedImage type the image is? –  haraldK Jun 7 '14 at 19:28
    
There is a strange image type. I've edited the question. –  Vladiator Jun 7 '14 at 19:44

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