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I'm trying to pass a char ** from the parent process to the child process. When i try to print the strings, my program terminates with no error... just terminates. This is my code:

I start with:

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    pid_t pid;
    char **args;
    int i;


    if(argc < 3)
    {
         perror("Argc");
         exit(1);
    }

    args = malloc(argc*sizeof(char *));

    for(i=0; i<argc; i++)
    {
        if( i == (argc-1) )
        {
            args[i] = NULL;
            break;
        }

        args[i] = malloc(strlen(argv[i+1])*sizeof(char));
        strcpy(args[i], argv[i+1]);
        printf("%s\n",args[i]);
    }

    if( server_exists() )
    {
    //pipes
    }

    else
    {       
        pid = fork();

        if(pid < 0)
        {
             perror("Fork");
             exit(1);
        }

        else if( pid == 0 )
        {           
             execl("./jobServer", "jobServer", NULL);           
        }   

        else if( pid > 0 )
        {
            for(i=0; i<argc-1; i++)
            {
                printf("%s\n",args[i]);
            }
            send_args(args, argc);
        }   
    }

    return 0;
}

A useful function:

void send_args(char **args, int argc)
{
    int fd, i;
    char *myfifo = "myfifo";
    int total = 0;

    for(i=0; i<argc-1; i++)
    {
        total += (strlen(args[i])) + 1 ;
        printf("%d %s\n",(strlen(args[i])), args[i]);
    }
    printf("asdf %d\n",total);
    mkfifo(myfifo, 0666);

    fd = open(myfifo, O_WRONLY);
    write(fd, args, sizeof(total));
    close(fd);

    unlink(myfifo);
}

The child process (exec "jobServer"):

#define MAX_BUF 2048

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    int fd,i=0;
    char *myfifo = "myfifo";
    char *buf[MAX_BUF];

    if( !server_exists() ) make_server(getpid());

    fd = open(myfifo, O_RDONLY);
    read(fd, buf, MAX_BUF);

    //I can't print these
    printf("%s\n",buf[0]);
    printf("%s\n",buf[1]);
    printf("%s\n",buf[2]);

    close(fd);

    return 0;
}

Can you help? Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The problem in your understanding is that named pipes just are like files or streams, so you can write bytes into them.

When you have an array of pointers (or a multidimensional array), the pointers will actually point somewhere else in memory (outside the array), so the receiving application will just follow these pointers and use whatever is at that address in their address space (which is different to the address space of the sender).

Therefore, you cannot just copy the array into your pipe/file/whatever, but instead have to extract all the data (follow the pointers) and write it individually.

Also, sizeof(total) will always be sizeof(int) (so probably 4 or 8) regardless of the actual value of total.

share|improve this answer
    
You mean that I have to do as many writes and reads as my strings? Can I pass the address of the pointer so I will be able to use the right address with the right data in it? –  a_user Jun 7 '14 at 13:08
    
Either that, or you have to copy (strcpy/strcat) all your strings into some contiguous memory you allocated before (separated in some way you can split later), and then write that one. –  mihi Jun 7 '14 at 13:10
    
Thanks for the advice! –  a_user Jun 7 '14 at 13:11
    
@a_user no, you cannot just send the pointer to another process, this pointer will not be valid in the second process. –  mch Jun 7 '14 at 13:20

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