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I've got a script that calls out to a bunch of commands, some of which are noisy to stdout, some to stderr, some to both. I intend the script to be run by cron, so I don't want it to be noisy and mail me every day -- only in error conditions. So I do:

be_quiet() {
  # save stderr in FD 3
  exec 3>&2 

  exec &> /dev/null
}

die() {
  # restore stderr
  exec 2>&3

  echo $* > /dev/stderr
  exit 1
}

Then, i.e.

be_quiet
mkdir -p $CLIENT_ROOT || die "Could not create client root."
cd $CLIENT_ROOT || die "Could not cd to client root."

The intent being that I get specific and meaningful-to-me messages if there is an error, and nothing otherwise. But what I'm seeing now is just

line 48: /dev/stderr: Permission denied

When run from the command line, this works. When run via cron, it gives the permission denied message. I'm unclear why.

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Is exec 3>&2 correct? stderr is 2 usually. –  Martin Wickman Mar 9 '10 at 15:02
    
This means that you don't have write permissions on /dev/stderr. Do your cron jobs run under the same user and group id as your interactive shell? Do you automatically switch to a specific group in your .profile, perhaps tty? –  Kilian Foth Mar 9 '10 at 15:04
    
> Is exec 3>&2 correct? Yes. As I said, this works when run interactively. Try this script: echo "Visible 1" >> /dev/stderr exec 3>&2 exec &> /dev/null echo "Invisible" >> /dev/stderr exec 2>&3 echo "Visible 2" >> /dev/stderr Again, this works interactively but fails via cron. > Do your cron jobs run under the same user and group id as your interactive shell? Yes. > Do you automatically switch to a specific group in your .profile No. –  arantius Mar 11 '10 at 14:46
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2 Answers

Instead of

exec 2>&3

do

exec 3>&-
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What does that do? Can you include the full example with stdout/stderr? –  The Doctor What Jan 23 '13 at 21:28
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Why not just redirect stdout in the cronjob to /dev/null? Don't use the be_quiet function, and change die to:

die() {
    echo "$*" >&2
}

Then, in your cronjob:

* * * * * /path/to/script.sh >/dev/null

You should only get mail from cron when your script outputs something using the die function.

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> Why not just redirect stdout ... Because some of the commands that I run are noisy to stdout, and some to stderr (and some both). As I said in the very first sentence of my question. –  arantius Mar 11 '10 at 14:30
    
I must have misunderstood, you said you only want to be mailed for error conditions so I assumed you didn't want to see anything at all from stdout and everything from stderr. –  Marc Bernstein Mar 11 '10 at 16:23
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