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I'm building a layout using Bootstrap 3 grids that should stack as follows:

Desktop:

1 | 2
1 | 2
- | 2
3 | 2

Mobile:

1
1
-
2
2
2
2
-
3

On another post I found a solution that floats the box2 to the right so that the grids stack correctly on the desktop. However, that only works when box2 is higher than box1. If it is not, box3 will show below box2 instead of box1. Is there any other way to stack these boxes as visualized above? All three boxes can have different heights and contain any number of lines of text, images, tables, etc.

http://jsfiddle.net/G9WPv/

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"that only works when box2 is higher than box1", but it seems to work when 2 is below 1? What's wrong with this example? –  Zach Saucier Jun 15 at 14:22
    
@ZachSaucier The problem is "that [it] only works when box2 is higher than box1" (jsfiddle.net/G9WPv/3). I want it always to be below box1 regardless of the height of box1 and box2. –  str Jun 15 at 14:33
    
Ah, so by higher you mean taller (: Thanks for the clarification. Are the widths of each set (in percentage/px/some other unit) or are they dynamic based on content? –  Zach Saucier Jun 15 at 17:39
    
@ZachSaucier Yes, exactly :) They are defined as a grid as in the demo, so they are dynamic based on the window size. –  str Jun 15 at 18:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted
+100

This is very possible with CSS, and you can do this with Bootstrap's grid layout. In terms of solving this, you need to exploit the properties of right vs left float.

Demo: http://www.bootply.com/l0Flnma2Im

Consider the following sample. You'd expect this to show up 100% as intended on xs viewports, because each would be 100% width in the order you want. And, you'd expect it to show up as intended on md/lg browsers as well with the 1/3 on the left, but 2 on the right.

<div class="col-xs-12 col-md-6">
  <div>1<br>1</div>
</div>
<div class="col-xs-12 col-md-6 pull-right">
  <div>2<br>2<br>2<br>2<br>2</div>
</div>
<div class="col-xs-12 col-md-6">
  <div>3</div>
</div>

Now, the only issue that arises is when the "1" block expands larger than the "2" block. When this happens, 3 appears on the right. Why is this happening? It happens because the float is simply trying to fill in the empty gap on the right. However, we can force it to always be on the left by using clear: left; to ensure nothing appears to the left of it.

.always-left {
    clear: left;
  }

The code now becomes:

<div class="col-xs-12 col-md-6">
  <div>1<br>1</div>
</div>
<div class="col-xs-12 col-md-6 pull-right">
  <div>2<br>2<br>2<br>2<br>2</div>
</div>
<div class="col-xs-12 col-md-6 always-left">
  <div>3</div>
</div>
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The boxes can contain any number of lines of text, images, tables, etc., so I do not know their height in advance. As a result, your solution does not seem to be applicable. –  str Jun 21 at 8:51
    
Under which circumstances are you having troubles with height with my example? It doesn't specify heights as you can see. Please edit your main question with the additional requirements as well. –  niko Jun 21 at 10:48
    
I do not know the content of the boxes in advance, so if their height is different, it will result in strange stacking as in bootply.com/6Ka8NnKTUd (gap between box1 and box3). –  str Jun 21 at 12:10
    
Ah, OK. Check my updated answer for a simpler solution. –  niko Jun 21 at 13:40
    
Awesome, this is it! float:right; (i.e. pull-right) on box2 and clear:left; on box3 did the trick. Thank you. –  str Jun 21 at 14:09

This is very possible to do using just media queries and some absolute positioning.

Look at this fiddle

You need to wrap your 3 divs inside a container.

essentially your css will look something like this.

.container {
    width: 100%;
    position: relative;
}
#box1 {
    background-color: #d7d7d7;
    width: 100%;
}
#box2 {
    background-color: #e7e7e7;
    width: 100%;
    position: relative;
}
#box3 {
    background-color: #f7f7f7;
    width: 100%;
}

@media screen and (min-width: 700px) {
    #box1, #box3 {
        width: 40%;
    }
    #box2 {
        width: 60%;
        position: absolute;
        top: 0;
        right: 0;
    }
}

The boxes can be of any size and on a mobile size screen they will stack in the correct order.

of course with the bootstrap gird system there might be a little tweaking involved to get it just right... but this is the essence of it.

Peace.

share|improve this answer
    
With the widths set, the number of elements set, and the height set this may be reasonable for a small number of elements. However, if any of those conditions are not met then the only option is to use a js alternative –  Zach Saucier Jun 17 at 14:05
    
@ZachSaucier this example perhaps has a set percentage based width, but the height or any element can be as big of small as needed/wanted... but in the scope of the original question it was not apparent that there would be more that 3 containers needed. –  Grapho Jun 17 at 14:13
    
This works but results in problems regarding overflowing the container caused by the absolute positioning. Any idea on how to solve that? –  str Jun 21 at 12:11
    
@niko posted a nice solution the the question. –  str Jun 21 at 14:10

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