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I have the following code

void func(char c[])  {
    c[1]= '@';
    std::cout<<c<<"\n"
             <<sizeof(c)<<"\n";
}

// Main 1
int main()  {
    char temp[6] = "pinta";
    func(temp);
}

Here if I change the main function to the following

//Main 2
int main()
{
    func("pinta");
}

meow@vikkyhacks ~/Arena/c/LinkedList $ g++-4.8 scrap/test.cpp 
scrap/test.cpp: In function ‘int main()’:
scrap/test.cpp:12:14: warning: deprecated conversion from string constant to ‘char*’ [-Wwrite-strings]
  func("pinta");
              ^

After some googling, I learned that the second main is not passing any character array by instead passing a read only string literal which when hits the c[1] = '@' throws a seg fault.

My Question is

  1. "How do I avoid the use of the temp variable which is used in the Main 1 and directly pass a character array to the func as its parameter ?"

  2. And important condition is to allow the editing of the character array passed into the func.

EDIT

I see there are many answers which prevent me from doing c[1]= '@'; , which I cannot do because that line is very important for me.

share|improve this question
2  
"classic" C arrays cannot be passed by value (unless encapsulated in a struct). Use std::string. –  Matteo Italia Jun 7 '14 at 18:12
2  
Change this void func(char c[]) to void func(const char* c, size_t c_size) and do everything consistently! –  πάντα ῥεῖ Jun 7 '14 at 18:14
    
@πάντα ῥεῖ After doing that, how will I able to change c[1] to @, the line c[1] = '@' will hit an error. –  vikkyhacks Jun 7 '14 at 18:22
    
@vikkyhacks 'how will I able to change ...' You cannot, that's all of the point! –  πάντα ῥεῖ Jun 7 '14 at 18:25
    
You can't do what you want to do. –  juanchopanza Jun 7 '14 at 18:25

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You cannot avoid creating a temporary, because it's illegal to write to the memory of a string literal, but you can make the compiler create it for you. Take as your parameter std::string instead- this is much safer than char arrays and will create a copy for you.

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1  
a little demo code would be appreciated !!! –  vikkyhacks Jun 7 '14 at 18:31
1  
@vikkyhacks He just told you what to do. You should also change sizeof(c) to c.size() in that case also. –  0x499602D2 Jun 7 '14 at 18:34
1  
    
@rightfold thanks !!! –  vikkyhacks Jun 7 '14 at 18:48
    
@rightfold func("") ... enjoy . (just a comment on the string panacea) –  Nikos Athanasiou Jun 8 '14 at 5:54

One way to do it is this :

template<int N>
void func(char const (&c)[N])  
{
    // c[1] = '@'; you cannot assign to variable that is const
    std::cout << c << "\n"
        << sizeof(c) << "\n";
}


int main()
{
    func("pinta");  
    return 0;
}

Note however that you only bind temporaries to const references.

Above you are actually passing a reference to an array sized as much as the length + 1(=\0) of the string literal you are giving.

Demo


If you need a modifiable variable inside func, then you need a copy of the char array :

template<int N>
void func(char const (&c)[N])  
{
    char cp[N];
    copy(begin(c), end(c), cp); 
    auto len = distance(begin(cp), end(cp));

    if (len > 1) cp[1] = '@';
    std::cout << cp << "\n"
        << sizeof(cp) << "\n";
}

I'd also add some range checking (it's the len part)

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 Γεια σου Ελλάδα! –  πάντα ῥεῖ Jun 7 '14 at 18:20
1  
@πάνταῥεῖ !!!!! Χαιρετισμούς! –  Nikos Athanasiou Jun 7 '14 at 18:38
    
Guys. English... –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 7 '14 at 18:49

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