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In R, I am trying to convert binary data to integer values, but instead of 1 value being stored in 1 byte, multiple values are stored within and across bytes.

I know there are 12 integer values stored across 64 bits (8 bytes). The 12 integers have the following bit count: 5,6,5,5,4,7,5,6,5,5,4,7 After the following code:

time <- readBin(fid,integer(),size=1,n=8,signed='FALSE')

The return is: [1] 25 156 113 63 214 158 113 63

The correct data should be: 25 32 19 17 11 31 22 54 19 17 11 31

I have tried using bitAnd and bitShiftL (package bitops), but have had no real success. And help would be greatly appreciated.

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1  
How can the second value be 32 if it occupies only 5 bits? –  Matthew Lundberg Jun 7 '14 at 20:42
    
Good catch (two of the digits were in the wrong order). The bit count is now correct. –  habd Jun 7 '14 at 23:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Note that the operation on each 4-byte integer is the same (the pattern is repeated twice). Thus, it suffices to solve the problem for a 4-byte integer, and loop over the 4-byte integers in the file (retrieved via readBin). This is much simpler than considering the problem byte-by-byte.

# length(x) should be 1
bitint <- function(x, bitlens) {
  result <- integer(length(bitlens))
  for (i in seq_along(bitlens)) {
    result[i] <- bitwAnd(x, (2^bitlens[i])-1)
    x <- bitwShiftR(x, bitlens[i])
  }
  return(result)
}

bitlens <- c(5,6,5,5,4,7)
x <- c(1064410137L, 1064410838L)
c(sapply(x, function(i) bitint(i, bitlens)))
## [1] 25 32 19 17 11 31 22 54 19 17 11 31
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This works extremely well. Pulling 4-byte integers is a good idea. Thank you! –  habd Jun 9 '14 at 17:44

I don't know of a clean elegant way to do this with the standard data reading base functions (function like redBin seems to prefer to no less than a byte at a time). So i've created a function that does some of the messy calculations to extract bits from bytes and turn them into numbers. I did end up using the bitwise operators in base R (see ?bitwAnd) Here's the function

bitints <- function(bytes, bitlengths) {
    stopifnot(sum(bitlengths) <= 8*length(bytes))
    stopifnot(all(bitlengths <= 8))
    bytebits <- rep.int(8, length(bytes))
    masks <- c(1L,3L,7L,15L,31L,63L,127L, 255L)
    outs <- numeric(length(bitlengths))
    for(i in seq_along(bitlengths)) {
        need <- bitlengths[i]
        got <- 0
        r <- 0
        while(need>0) {
            j <- which(bytebits>0)[1]
            bitget <- min(need, bytebits[j])
            r <- r + bitwShiftL(bitwAnd(bytes[j],masks[bitget]), got)
            bytebits[j] = bytebits[j]-bitget
            bytes[j] = bitwShiftR(bytes[j], bitget)
            need <- need - bitget
            got <- got + bitget
        }
        outs[i] <- r
    }
    outs
}

You just pass in your array of byte values and your array of bit sizes to get the values you need. Here's an example using your data.

bytes <- c(25L, 156L, 113L, 63L, 214L, 158L, 113L, 63L)
bitlens <- c(5,6,5,5,4,7,5,6,5,5,4,7)
bitints( bytes, c(5,6,5,5,4,7,5,6,5,5,4,7) )
#  [1] 25 32 19 17 11 31 22 54 19 17 11 31

Note that I had to change around some of your bit lengths to get the values you were expecting. You might want to double check that you either had the expected output correct or that your bit lengths were correct.

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