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import java.util.Scanner;

public class Test {

    public static void main(String args[]) {
        String name = " ", n;
        double r, h, s, m = 0;
        int c;

        Scanner i = new Scanner(System.in);
        Employee e[] = new Employee[5];

        for (int j = 0; j < 5; j++) {
            System.out.printf("\nPlease enter the name of Employee %d ", j + 1);
            /* THE PROBLEM LIES IN THE ABOVE STATEMENT IT IS EXECUTED ONLY ONCE WHILE IT'S MEANT TO BE EXECUTED 5 TIMES */
            n = i.nextLine();
            System.out.print("\t1.PartTime\n\t2.FullTime\n");
            c = i.nextInt();

            switch (c) {
                case 1:
                    System.out.print("hours worked ");
                    h = i.nextDouble();
                    System.out.print("rate per hour ");
                    r = i.nextDouble();
                    e[j] = new Part(n, h, r);
                    break;
                case 2:
                    System.out.print("Salary ");
                    s = i.nextDouble();
                    e[j] = new Full(n, s);
                    break;
                default:
                    System.out.print("\n***INVALID*** ");
                    j--;
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
Just curious: what do you hope to achieve by writing sentences all caps? –  Bart Kiers Jun 7 at 20:26
    
System.out flushes on newlines by default. Lots of your prints are probably not flushing. –  Mike Samuel Jun 7 at 20:27
    
@Braj the breaks are for the switch statement –  BitNinja Jun 7 at 20:28
    
It's working as expected. Share the actual code. –  Braj Jun 7 at 20:30
1  
How is Swing involved? –  trashgod Jun 7 at 20:49

2 Answers 2

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/nutsandbolts/switch.html

So you should add a break after each case.

I preffer using println instead of printf, it will allow you to use less "\n" and make your code more organized.

You are using java like it is C++, It is much easier in my opinion doing System.out.println("Please enter the name of Employee" + (j+1));

It's kinda hard helping you without the rest of the source code.

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The problem is, on the second loop n = i.nextLine(); is been skipped because there is still line of content in the Scanners buffer, instead, you need to clear Scanner

You could add something like...

if (i.hasNextLine()) {
    i.nextLine();
}

to the end of the for-loop, for example..

for (int j = 0; j < 5; j++) {
    System.out.printf("\nPlease enter the name of Employee %d ", j + 1);
    /* THE PROBLEM LIES IN THE ABOVE STATEMENT IT IS EXECUTED ONLY ONCE WHILE IT'S MEANT TO BE EXECUTED 5 TIMES */
    n = i.nextLine();
    System.out.print("\t1.PartTime\n\t2.FullTime\n");
    c = i.nextInt();

    switch (c) {
        case 1:
            System.out.print("hours worked ");
            h = i.nextDouble();
            System.out.print("rate per hour ");
            r = i.nextDouble();
            e[j] = new Part(n, h, r);
            break;
        case 2:
            System.out.print("Salary ");
            s = i.nextDouble();
            e[j] = new Full(n, s);
            break;
        default:
            System.out.print("\n***INVALID*** ");
            j--;
    }
    if (i.hasNextLine()) {
        i.nextLine();
    }
}

Which will ensure that the Scanner has no other content left from previous inputs

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