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Say I am initialization a vector<vector<string>> like so:

vector<vector<string>> v;
v = {{
    {"a", "b", "c"},
    {"aa", "bb"},
    {"xyz", "yzx", "zxy"},
    {}
}};

Now suppose I want to append an already existing vector<string> to some of v's elements. Like so:

vector<string> suffix {{"1", "2", "3"}};
vector<vector<string>> v;
v = {{
    {"a", "b", "c"} + suffix,
    {"aa", "bb"},
    {"xyz", "yzx", "zxy"} + suffix,
    {}
}};

That syntax obviously doesn't work because operator+ is not defined in such a way.

I understand that it's possible to construct v the first way and then write

vector<int> indices = {0, 2};
for(int i: indices)
   v[i].insert(v[i].end(), suffix.begin(), suffix.end());

But this is not convenient because I may have several suffix vectors that are attached to arbitrary v[i]. I want the suffix to be together with the initialization of the v[i] so it makes sense and I don't have to shift indices if I add/remove elements from v's initialization.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

One possible solution is to use a helper function that does the appending.

vector<string> appendStrings(vector<string>&& s1, vector<string> const& s2)
{
   s1.insert(s1.end(), s2.begin(), s2.end());
   return s1;
}

And use it to initialize the variable.

vector<string> suffix {{"1", "2", "3"}};
vector<vector<string>> v = {{
    appendStrings({"a", "b", "c"}, suffix),
    {"aa", "bb"},
    appendStrings({"xyz", "yzx", "zxy"}, suffix),
    {}
}};

Update

A more efficient implementation of appendStrings (Thanks to @Yakk):

vector<string> appendStrings(initializer_list<char const*>&& s1,
                             vector<string> const& s2)
{
   vector<string> ret.
   ret.reserve(s1.size() + s2.size());
   for (auto item : s1 ) {
      ret.emplace_back(item);
   }
   ret.insert(ret.end(), s2.begin(), s2.end() );
   return ret;
}
share|improve this answer
    
If s1 is an initializer list, avoid an allocation. If you move return, avoid another. –  Yakk Jun 8 '14 at 3:08
    
@Yakk, I think I understand the move return part but I have no idea what you mean by the first part of your comment. –  R Sahu Jun 8 '14 at 3:15
    
Change vector<string>&& to std::initializer_list<const char*> (or T). Create a vector within that reserves enough for said list and 2nd vector, then load it up, and return. Get 1 memory allocation, plus 1 per std::string allocated, instead of your ... 3? plus 2 per std::string (move drops it to 2+1). Just microoptimization. –  Yakk Jun 8 '14 at 3:30
    
@Yakk Now it makes sense. I added an update. –  R Sahu Jun 8 '14 at 3:42
    
@Yakk The move return seems redundant to me. NRVO will already take care of it. –  D Drmmr Jun 8 '14 at 8:12

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