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I know this is most-likely a simple question but when you restore a database from inside SQL management studio you can set the update interval with stats

RESTORE DATABASE [test] FROM  DISK = N'C:\Program Files\Microsoft SQL Server\MSSQL.1\MSSQL\Backup\test.bak' WITH  FILE = 1,  NOUNLOAD,  STATS = 10

If I wanted to execute that line of code from inside c# how would i get the progress? Currently I just use System.Data.SqlClient.SqlCommand.ExecuteNonQuery() but I can not figure out how to get the progress.

Also, if it is any faster, using the Microsoft.SQLServer namespace is acceptable.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

ExecuteNonQuery is only going to return once the operation is complete. There might be a way to monitor its progress from a connection on another thread or to use an async call, but you could also look at using SMO, which provides a way to register callbacks see http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/microsoft.sqlserver.management.smo.restore.aspx and http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms162133.aspx with PercentComplete event

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Do you know if the SQL2008 SDK is backwards compatible with the 2005 and 2000 servers OR is the SQL2000 SDK forward compatible. (I need to administer a 2000 and 2005 instance on the same server and some point in the future a 2008 instance) –  Scott Chamberlain Mar 9 '10 at 18:12
    
@Scott Chamberlain I would use the latest SDK and test against the old servers. That has the highest likelihood of success. The 2000 SDK didn't even have SMO (it had something called SQL-DMO). –  Cade Roux Mar 9 '10 at 19:03
    
@Scott Chamberlain In SQL Server 2000, for Remus' solution, you will need to use the sysprocesses table, because that DMV was not available in that version. –  Cade Roux Mar 9 '10 at 19:08
    
In researching SMO's they work with compatibility level 80 (sql2000) and up. –  Scott Chamberlain Mar 10 '10 at 4:35

Before you start the operation get the connection session id:

SELECT @@SPID;

Then start your backup request. From a different connection, query sys.dm_exec_requests and look at percent_complete for the session that executes the restore statement:

Percentage of work completed for the following commands:

  • ALTER INDEX REORGANIZE
  • AUTO_SHRINK option with ALTER DATABASE
  • BACKUP DATABASE
  • CREATE INDEX
  • DBCC CHECKDB
  • DBCC CHECKFILEGROUP
  • DBCC CHECKTABLE
  • DBCC INDEXDEFRAG
  • DBCC SHRINKDATABASE
  • DBCC SHRINKFILE
  • KILL (Transact-SQL)
  • RESTORE DATABASE
  • UPDATE STATISTICS.
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