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I don't understand why I get ClassCastException on below code in line:

for(int i = 0; i < k.t.length; i++)

So problem is that in method addElement I make replacing of array elements by objects with type T. In my opinion in array should be objects with type T. And compiler doesn't protest for that. But in run-time JVM cannot cast despite in array is really objects with type T (in case below String), why JVM cannot use polymorphism?

But when I change the T[] t; to Object[] t;

and remove cast in constructor it run correctly without any errors, why?

public class MyCollection<T> {

T[] t;

MyCollection( int size){
    t = (T[]) new Object[size];
}

boolean addElement(T e, int i){        
    if(i < t.length){
        t[i] = e;
        return true;
    }
    return false;

}


public static void main(String[] ss){

    MyCollection<String> k = new MyCollection<String>(3);

    k.addElement("a",0);
    k.addElement("b",1);
    k.addElement("c",2);

    for(int i = 0; i < k.t.length; i++)
        System.out.println(k.t[i]);     

    //for(String s : (String[])k.t)
    //    System.out.println(s);        
 }
}
share|improve this question
    
Maybe you need k.t[0].toString() –  algui91 Jun 8 at 8:12
    
@algui91: no, println already does that. –  Oliver Charlesworth Jun 8 at 8:12
    
Have you tried? –  algui91 Jun 8 at 8:14
    
    
@algui91 The problem isn't on System.out.println(k.t[0]); but on for(int i = 0; i < k.t.length; i++) –  LunaVulpo Jun 8 at 8:44

3 Answers 3

The problem is that you're casting Object[] to T[], and then you're exposing the underlying array. The only reason this works altogether is because the type erasure of T is Object. But since in our case T is being interpreted as String, when we access the array externally, we're trying to cast it to String[], which is incorrect. In order to avoid this issue, you should make the array private and provide accessor methods to retrieve elements. By doing that, you only cast individual elements to their correct type without making assumptions about the underlying array.

public class MyCollection<T> {

    private T[] t;

    MyCollection( int size){
        t = (T[]) new Object[size];
    }

    boolean addElement(T e, int i){        
        if(i < t.length){
            t[i] = e;
            return true;
        }
        return false;

    }

    T getElement(int index) {
        return t[index];
    }

    int getLength() {
        return t.length;
    }

    public static void main(String[] ss){

        MyCollection<String> k = new MyCollection<String>(3);

        k.addElement("a",0);
        k.addElement("b",1);
        k.addElement("c",2);

        for(int i = 0; i < k.getLength(); i++)
            System.out.println(k.getElement(i));     

        //for(String s : (String[])k.t)
        //    System.out.println(s);        
     }
}

Note that Java's Collection interface demonstrates the same behavior. Collection.toArray() returns Object[] regardless of the type of E. The only available workaround is Collection.toArray(T[]), where you're forced to pass an array with a fixed type, which can then be either be populated or copied.

share|improve this answer
    
It would also break type-safety to allow such a cast (Object[] to T[]), as there is no way to statically determine whether your Object-array contains only T's. –  Seb Jun 8 at 20:00
    
@SebastianOkon As long as the array is internally managed, you can be certain it will always contain Ts. In that case, using an array of T lets you skip casting values to T upon retrieval. –  shmosel Jun 8 at 20:07
    
I did not meant to disagree to you. If it is implemented like this it is fine. Nevertheless this is potentially dangerous as you do not get any warning in case you make some changes/extensions later. –  Seb Jun 8 at 20:27

Check again the line of the problem. In my opinion the exception will be thrown because of:

    for(String s : (String[])k.t)

You`re trying to cast to String[] here, while the array is defined as Object[]:

t = (T[]) new Object[size];
share|improve this answer
    
But he says the error is in the first loop for(int i = 0; i < k.t.length; i++) –  algui91 Jun 8 at 8:18
    
He is correct that the error is in the first loop. –  merlin2011 Jun 8 at 8:18
1  
The sample problem occurs in the first loop. It's really equivalent to for (int i = 0; i < ((String[])k.t).length); i++). –  Oliver Charlesworth Jun 8 at 8:19
    
You can look how own collection with array can be made in grepcode.com/file/repository.grepcode.com/java/root/jdk/openjdk/… –  hexin Jun 8 at 8:26

you can Create a new instance of array using the reflection to avoid ClassCastException

example:

    import java.lang.reflect.Array;

public class MyCollection<T> {

    T[] t;

    MyCollection(Class<T> clazz, int size) {
        t = (T[]) Array.newInstance(clazz, size);

    }

    boolean addElement(T e, int i) {
        if (i < t.length - 1) {
            t[i] = e;
            return true;
        }
        return false;

    }

    public static void main(String[] ss) {

        MyCollection<String> k = new MyCollection<String>(String.class, 3);

        k.addElement("a", 0);
        k.addElement("b", 1);
        k.addElement("c", 2);

        for (int i = 0; i < k.t.length; i++)
            System.out.println(k.t[0]);

    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I know that I can do that. But I'm instresting why I cannot do as I write. –  LunaVulpo Jun 8 at 8:46
    
So problem is that in method addElement I make replacing of array elements by objects with type T. In my opinion in array should be objects with type T. And compiler doesn't protest for that. But in run-time JVM cannot cast despite in array is really objects with type T (in case below String), why JVM cannot use polymorphism? –  LunaVulpo Jun 8 at 8:54
    
@LunaVulpo that is beause java doesnt know what T is and therefore cant use polymorphism due to that. –  Rod_Algonquin Jun 8 at 9:05

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