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I have a quite complex class hierarchy in which the classes are cross-like depending on each other: There are two abstract classes A and C containing a method that returns an instance of C and A, respectively. In their inherited classes I want to use a co-variant type, which is in this case a problem since I don't know a way to forward-declare the inheritance relation ship.

I obtain a "test.cpp:22: error: invalid covariant return type for ‘virtual D* B::outC()’"-error since the compiler does not know that D is a subclass of C.

class C;

class A {
public:
        virtual C* outC() = 0;
};

class C {
public:
        virtual A* outA() = 0;
};


class D;

class B : public A {
public:
        D* outC();
};

class D : public C {
public:
        B* outA();
};

D* B::outC() {
        return new D();
}

B* D::outA() {
        return new B();
}

If I change the return type of B::outC() to C* the example compiles. Is there any way to keep B* and D* as return types in the inherited classes (it would be intuitive to me that there is a way)?

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2  
Do you really need that type entangling? (calling it coupling could be a little short) –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Mar 9 '10 at 17:17
    
Sometimes it's not a problem of language, it's a problem with the way we try to use it. If your two hierarchies are so deeply coupled, I think you'd be better of with one hierarchy (fusing A with C and B with D) since it very looks like they cannot work without one another anyway. –  Matthieu M. Mar 9 '10 at 19:38
    
Well, I have two types of classes: A specification for a task and an executor that actually executes the task (launches several threads). The specification itself should be a factory for the task and every executor needs to access its specification. And there are various specifications with their tasks. So the executor wraps a specification, so coupling is only strong in one direction, in the other direction it is only the factory-method. –  Searles Mar 9 '10 at 21:34
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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I know of no way of having directly coupled covariant members in C++. You'll have either to add a layer, or implement covariant return yourself.

For the first option

class C;

class A {
public:
        virtual C* outC() = 0;
};

class C {
public:
        virtual A* outA() = 0;
};


class BI : public A {
public:
};

class D : public C {
public:
        BI* outA();
};

class B: public BI {
public:
        D* outC();
};

D* B::outC() {
        return new D();
}

BI* D::outA() {
        return new B();
}

and for the second

class C;

class A {
public:
        C* outC() { return do_outC(); }
        virtual C* do_outC() = 0;
};

class C {
public:
        virtual A* outA() = 0;
};


class D;

class B : public A {
public:
        D* outC();
        virtual C* do_outC();
};

class D : public C {
public:
        B* outA();
};

D* B::outC() {
        return static_cast<D*>(do_outC());
}

C* B::do_outC() {
        return new D();
}

B* D::outA() {
        return new B();
}

Note that this second option is what is done implicitly by the compiler (with some static checks that the static_cast is valid).

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You can't do this due to client side expectation. When using a C instance, you can't tell which kind of C it is (a D or something else). Thus, if you store the B pointer (resulting from a call to the derived class but you don't know it at compile time) into a A pointer, I'm not sure that all the memory stuff will be right.

When you call a method on a polymorphic type, the runtime environment has to check the dynamic type of the object and it moves pointers to suit to your class hierarchy. I'm not sure that you should rely on covariance. Have a look at this

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1  
You've misunderstood. Covariant return types are allowed. If the client expects an A pointer, but you give it a B pointer, that's find because all instances of B are instances of A as well. The problem in this case is that the compiler cannot verify at the declaration of B::outC that the new return type D is a descendant of the original return type C. If the compiler could have seen the full definition of D, it would have allowed the new signature. Note that the compiler issues no complaints about D::outA because it knows C is a descendant of A. –  Rob Kennedy Mar 9 '10 at 16:46
1  
In my example, the co-variant return type in class D is not a problem. –  Searles Mar 9 '10 at 22:23
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As far as I know, there's no way to do this without explicit casting. The problem is that the definition of class B can't know that D is a subclass of C until it sees a full definition of class D, but the definition of class D can't know that B is a subclass of A until it sees a full definition of class B, and so you have a circular dependency. This can't be resolved with forward-declarations because a forward declaration unfortunately cannot specify an inheritance relationship.

There's a similar problem with trying to implement a covariant clone() method using templates, which I found can be solved, but the analogous solution still fails here because the circular reference remains impossible to resolve.

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This is indeed a problem of circular dependency. The same applies when you try to use cross-dependent typedefs, enums, fields etc. +1 –  doc Mar 9 '10 at 17:16
    
Everyone has been bitten by this clone problem... What I don't like about the solution presented it the wrapping part tough, typedef cannot be forward declared and it's a pain if your clients have to know not to use the undecorated name :/ –  Matthieu M. Mar 9 '10 at 19:36
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