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Does Swift have a way of mixing in traits, a la Scala? The section of the Swift book on using extensions to add protocols to existing classes comes tantalizingly close. However, since protocols can't contain an implementation, this can't be used to mix code into a class. Is there another way?

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3 Answers 3

I don't know Scala, but from what you're telling me it is possible to simultaneously create a protocol and an extension that extends a type to add "pseudo-trait" behavior.

For example:

protocol IsGreaterThan
{
    func isGreaterThan(other:Int) -> Bool
    func isNotGreaterThan(other:Int) -> Bool
}

extension Int : IsGreaterThan
{
    func isGreaterThan(other:Int) -> Bool
    {
        return self > other
    }

    func isNotGreaterThan(other:Int) -> Bool
    {
        return !isGreaterThan(other)
    }
}

The real hamstring is how generics are somewhat limited for now. I think they will improve a lot in the coming revisions of Swift.

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immediately this is where my brain went, would love to see the other options, i suspect there are more ways than these 2 –  Joe Jun 16 at 17:26
    
The key feature traits/mixins have over protocols is that they can include method implementations and can be mixed into other classes. It doesn't seem like this is quite possible in Swift today. –  Bill Jun 16 at 20:21
    
@bill I don't understand what the issue is. Extensions can add method implementations and it can add protocols. –  sanz Jun 17 at 16:03
5  
@sanz Yes, but you have to rewrite the implementations for any class you extend. A trait system (or something approximating it) would let me have one class called IntegerComparable that includes implementation and can simply be mixed into other classes. Under your system, I would need to copy the method bodies isGreaterThan and isNotGreaterThan into every class I want to extend, right? –  Bill Jun 17 at 16:05
    
@Bill Yes, you are correct, unfortunately you would have to do so. –  SiLo Jun 17 at 16:11

One way to simulate mixing is use generic function to provide implementation

For example with these protocols

protocol Named {
    func GetName() -> String
}

protocol NamedExtension {
    func GetLowercaseName() -> String
    func GetUppercaseName() -> String
}

I want some class to implement GetName() and use mixing so they also get GetLowercaseName() and GetUppercaseName() without implement them

This is the implementation of NamedExtension as in free function

func GetLowercaseNameImpl<T:Named>(obj:T) -> String {
    return obj.GetName().lowercaseString
}

func GetUppercaseNameImpl<T:Named>(obj:T) -> String {
    return obj.GetName().uppercaseString
}

and extensions on Int

extension Int : Named {
    func GetName() -> String {
        return "Int"
    }
}

extension Int : NamedExtension {
    // use provided implementation
    func GetLowercaseName() -> String {
        return GetLowercaseNameImpl(self)
    }
    func GetUppercaseName() -> String {
        return GetUppercaseNameImpl(self)
    }
}

and I can use

1.GetName() // result Int
1.GetUppercaseName() // result "INT"
1.GetLowercaseName() // result "int"
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I know it is not ideal because there are still 8 lines of boilerplate code here, hopefully there are better ways –  Bryan Chen Jun 12 at 1:00

Similar to Bryan Chen's answer:

import Foundation

protocol Named {
    var name : String { get }
}

protocol NamedExtension : Named { // NB extends Named
    var lowercaseName : String { get }
    var uppercaseName : String { get }
}

struct NamedExtensionDefault { // Put defaults inside a struct to keep name spaces seperate
    static func lowercaseName(named : NamedExtension) -> String {
        return (named.name as NSString).lowercaseString
    }
    static func uppercaseName(named : NamedExtension) -> String {
        return (named.name as NSString).uppercaseString
    }
}

extension Int : NamedExtension {
    var name : String {
    return "Int"
    }
    // Use default implementation
    var lowercaseName : String {
    return NamedExtensionDefault.lowercaseName(self)
    }
    var uppercaseName : String {
    return NamedExtensionDefault.uppercaseName(self)
    }
}

1.name // result Int
1.uppercaseName // result "INT"
1.lowercaseName // result "int"

The main difference from Bryan's answer is that I didn't use generics because I made NamedExtension extends Named, so that the default implementations can access name.

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