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I have a long computation algorithm that I want to involve in a Play application.

I want to add a timeout value so if the computation takes longer than some time, it should be interrupted and some error message shown.

Looking at Handling asynchronous results documentation - handling time-outs it explains how to create a time-out on a long computation.

However, I noticed that although the user receives the time-out message, the computation is not interrupted, i.e. the log messages keep printing forever.

How can one interrupt the long computation after the timeout has been raised?

The example controller code is:

object Application extends Controller {

  def timeout(n:Integer)  = Action.async {
    val futureInt = scala.concurrent.Future { longComputation() }
    val timeoutFuture = play.api.libs.concurrent.Promise.timeout("Oops", 1.second)
    Future.firstCompletedOf(Seq(futureInt, timeoutFuture)).map {
     case i: Int => Ok("Got result: " + i)
     case t: String => InternalServerError(t)
    }
  }

   def longComputation(): Int = {
     while (true) {
      Thread.sleep(1000)
      Logger.debug("Computing...")
    }
    return 0
   }

}
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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

To fulfill the requirements of this question, it's necessary to be able to interrupt the long-running computation if its running time exceeds a maximum duration. Additionally, it's necessary to deal with the possibility of this interruption in the controller action.

Assuming the computation involves several steps and/or repetitions, one approach to interrupt this computation (instead of just abandoning its result and leave the computation running) is to periodically check if the current duration of the computation is greater than a maximum duration.

In order to make it explicit that this computation can fail, it can be declared as returning Try[T].

The action can then check for the result of the computation attempt when the future succeeds, and produce the appropriate output for a successful or failed attempt.

For example:

package controllers

import play.api._
import play.api.libs.concurrent.Akka
import play.api.libs.concurrent.Execution.Implicits.defaultContext
import play.api.mvc._
import play.api.Play.current
import scala.concurrent.duration._
import scala.concurrent.ExecutionContext
import scala.concurrent.Future
import scala.util._

object Application extends Controller {

  def factorial(n: Int) = Action.async {
    computeFactorial(n, 3.seconds).map { result =>
      result match {
        case Success(i) => Ok(s"$n! = $i")
        case Failure(ex) => InternalServerError(ex.getMessage)
      }
    }
  }

  def computeFactorial(n: BigInt, timeout: Duration): Future[Try[BigInt]] = {

    val startTime = System.nanoTime()
    val maxTime = timeout.toNanos

    def factorial(n: BigInt, result: BigInt = 1): BigInt = {
      // Calculate elapsed time.
      val elapsed = System.nanoTime() - startTime
      Logger.debug(s"Computing factorial($n) with $elapsed nanoseconds elapsed.")

      // Abort computation if timeout was exceeded.
      if (elapsed > maxTime) {
        Logger.debug(s"Timeout exceeded.")
        throw new ComputationTimeoutException("The maximum time for the computation was exceeded.")
      }

      // Introduce an artificial delay so that less iterations are required to produce the error.
      Thread.sleep(100)

      // Compute step.
      if (n == 0) result else factorial(n - 1, n * result)
    }

    Future {
      try {
        Success(factorial(n))
      } catch {
        case ex: Exception => Failure(ex)
      }
    }(Contexts.computationContext)
  }

}

class ComputationTimeoutException(msg: String) extends RuntimeException(msg)

object Contexts {
  implicit val computationContext: ExecutionContext = Akka.system.dispatchers.lookup("contexts.computationContext")
}

The code can be more concise if it's not required to explicitly mark the computation's result as fallible, and if Play's default async failure handling (returning 500 Internal Server Error) is sufficient:

object Application extends Controller {

  def factorial(n: Int) = Action.async {
    computeFactorial(n, 3.seconds).map { i => Ok(s"$n! = $i") }
  }

  def computeFactorial(n: BigInt, timeout: Duration): Future[BigInt] = {
    val startTime = System.nanoTime()
    val maxTime = timeout.toNanos

    def factorial(n: BigInt, result: BigInt = 1): BigInt = {
      if (System.nanoTime() - startTime > maxTime) {
        throw new RuntimeException("The maximum time for the computation was exceeded.")
      }
      Thread.sleep(100)
      if (n == 0) result else factorial(n - 1, n * result)
    }

    Future { factorial(n) }(Akka.system.dispatchers.lookup("contexts.computationContext"))
  }

}

The examples run the computation in a custom context which provides a thread pool that is distinct from the thread pool that Play uses for handling the HTTP requests. See Understanding Play thread pools for more information. The context is declared in application.conf:

contexts {
  computationContext {
    fork-join-executor {
      parallelism-factor=20
      parallelism-max = 200
    }
  }
}

See this GitHub project for a downloadable example.

share|improve this answer
    
I am trying to execute your code but I get: [RuntimeException: java.lang.ExceptionInInitializerError], do I need to add something in the configuration? I have tried with both Play 2.2 and Play 2.3... –  Labra Jul 8 '14 at 14:34
    
I updated the answer with a link to an example repository. Please download it and let me know if there are any issues. –  Fernando Correia Jul 8 '14 at 15:19
    
Thanks, I noticed that that only change that I needed to do was to add the following lines in conf/application.conf: contexts { computationContext { fork-join-executor { parallelism-factor=20 parallelism-max = 200 } } } –  Labra Jul 8 '14 at 15:41
    
That's right, the examples use a custom execution context in order to run the computation in a separate thread pool. I updated the answer with this information. –  Fernando Correia Jul 8 '14 at 16:40

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