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Let's say I have a model football Team. It plays Matches in a group with other teams. Now I want to select top 2 teams from the list. The score is counted as usual: 3 for the win, 1 for the draw, 0 for the loss.

The model for Match looks like this:

[Key]
public int MatchId{get;set;}
public int HomeTeamId { get; set; }
public int AwayTeamId { get; set; }
[ForeignKey("HomeTeamId")]
public virtual Team HomeTeam { get; set; }
[ForeignKey("AwayTeamId")]
public virtual Team AwayTeam { get; set; }
public int? HomeTeamScored { get; set; }
public int? AwayTeamScored { get; set; }

I've tested this 5 solutions:

1) have a view instead of the table to take the score column from, but it complicates the programming part since I will have to somehow tell EF to use the table for insertion but the view for showing the data

2) Have the column Score as not mapped, then take all teams, count the score like this:

var list = db.Teams.ToList();

foreach(var team in list)
{
    team.Score = db.Matches.Where(...).Sum();
}

then just order the list by Score and take first 2.

3) Another way is to have

var list = db.Teams.OrderByDesc(t => db.Matches.Where(...).Sum()).Take(2).ToList();

I will have to do a lot of checking for null, also checking which team won or drawn, whether the team I was looking for played as home or away, etc.

4) Yet another option would be to recount the Score for the team every time I add/edit a match, however I feel like it is a very unprofessional approach.

As I said, each of these methods are solutions that would lead me to solving the task, but... I am having a sixth sense that I am missing something completely obvious as of how I could make this with the least effort. Can anyone suggest what I am missing?

P.S. If it affects the answer, let's assume I am using the latest version of everything.

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Show something you've implemented, and explain why it doesn't satisfy you, or howit can be improved. But plear,do you a favor, don't ask other people to make your job and experiment yourself. If not, you'll never learn. – JotaBe Jun 8 '14 at 20:47
2  
@JotaBe Pretty sure you did skip reading the question (a.k.a. tldr; let's rant about the quality of the question because I wouldn't care to read it through). I have already implemented each of the methods I talked about (not to mention the only missing thing is the formula which is not even relevant to this, is that what you are asking for?). Please show me the parts I am asking someone to do MY job. Show me another equally good question in SO which shows five solutions to the problem in the question itself and just merely asks if any better ways exist. – Andrius Naruševičius Jun 8 '14 at 20:57
    
Even if I'm quite short of time, I've edited your answer in a format that allows to read, understand, an answer to it more quickly (but showing your code would make it even quicker. Why not showing it if you implemented it?). And I'm even going to post an answer, where you will see why your question is not so good, even after reordering it: there are missing code in your question, and there are only four solutions, as far as I can see after editing (if the edition is approved). – JotaBe Jun 9 '14 at 10:06
up vote 1 down vote accepted

When data redundancy looms, often normalization is the solution. I think in your case you need a bit of both, normalization and a bit of redundancy.

The repeated properties in Match are "smelly". They seem to call for normalization. A closer look reveals that this is not true for all of them. A match consists of two teams, always. So the two TeamIds are OK (and the accompanying references). But you could store the scores differently.

Take a look at this possible model:

class Team
{
    public int TeamId { get; set; }
    // ...
    public ICollection<MatchTeam> MatchTeams { get; set; }
}

class Match
{
    public int MatchId { get; set; }
    public int HomeTeamId { get; set; }
    public int AwayTeamId { get; set; }
    public virtual Team HomeTeam { get; set; }
    public virtual Team AwayTeam { get; set; }
}

class MatchTeam
{
    public int MatchId { get; set; }
    public int TeamId { get; set; }
    public int Scored { get; set; } // Number of goals/points whatever
    public int RankingScore { get; set; } // 0, 1, or 3
}

MatchTeam is an entity that stores the achievements of 1 team in 1 match. The Scored property is normalized result of HomeTeamScored and AwayTeamScored. The advantage is: the property isn't nullable: a MatchTeam entry is created when the results are a fact.

The redundancy is in the RankingScore property. This has to be determined when a match is entered or modified and it depends on (and should be consistent with) the scores. As always with redundancy, there's the danger of data inconsistency. But is it a big danger? If there is only one service method by which MatchTeam data are entered or modified the danger is confined sufficiently.

The advantage is that now it's doable to collect the total scores for each team at runtime:

var topTeams = context.Teams
              .OrderByDescending(t => t.MatchTeams.Sum(mt => mt.RankingScore))
              .Take(2);
share|improve this answer
    
This, in fact, looks like the most appropriate way of doing this. Thank you very much for the effort put into the answer :) – Andrius Naruševičius Jun 9 '14 at 5:56

1) I don't understand why implementing a view complicates your programming at at all. That's a good solution. Inserting a match result and getting the top teams are two completely independent operations. Please, let me see some code to understand why you have that strong coupling between them suchs independent things as a match score and a total score of a team.

2) This is a bad option: you need to make a query for all teams, and an additional query for each team. Bad performance!

3) It would be good to see your code to show how you can improve your query. For example making null checking is not that bad. It's as simple as using the ?? operator, i.e. mt => mt.HomeTeamSocred ?? 0 will convert null to 0 quite easily. If you showed the used expression it would be possible to see if it can be improved and simplified. However,I can propose this one, which is not that complicated:

ctx.Match.Select(m => new
{ // Score for HomeTeam
    TeamScore = (m.HomeTeamScored ?? 0) > (m.AwayTeamScored ?? 0)
        ? 3 : (m.HomeTeamScored ?? 0) < (m.AwayTeamScored ?? 0)
        ? 0 : 1,
    TeamId = m.HomeTeamId,
})
.Concat(
    ctx.Match.Select(m => new
    { // Score for away Team
        TeamScore = (m.HomeTeamScored ?? 0) > (m.AwayTeamScored ?? 0)
            ? 0 : (m.HomeTeamScored ?? 0) < (m.AwayTeamScored ?? 0)
            ? 3 : 1,
        TeamId = m.AwayTeamId,
    })
).GroupBy(mr => mr.TeamId) // Group match scores by TeamId's
.Select(mrs=> new
{
    TeamId = mrs.Key,
    TotalScore = mrs.Sum(m => m.TeamScore)
})
.OrderByDescending(ts => ts.TotalScore)
.Take(2);

However there is something I don't understand. Why a Home/AwayTeamScored can be null? Since before the match starts, the Score must be zero for both teams. That null makes no senses. This would avoid the trobule with checking nulls.

4) What does this option mean?

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