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I have an issue. I am learning bout binary arrays and trying to figure it out. I am trying to make it so a user would enter their book number and this would search through the array reflist for it and then print it through booklist.

Problem is that when I enter a number greater than 1 the compare value never reaches 0.

     public Boolean binarySearch(String [] A, int left, int right, String V){
     int middle;
     numOfSearches ++;
     if (left > right) {
         return false;
     }

     middle = (left + right)/2;
     int compare = V.compareTo(A[middle]);
     System.out.println("Middle value: "+middle);
     if (compare == 0) {
         binaryOutput.setText("The book is: "+bookList[middle]);
     }
     if (compare < 0) {
         return binarySearch(A, left, (middle-1), V);
     } else {
         return binarySearch(A, middle + 1, right, V);
     }
 }
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1  
How does the swing tag apply? Why not Collections.binarySearch()? How can you debug this without a complete example and failed test case? –  trashgod Jun 9 '14 at 0:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Just a forgotten return true.

 if (left > right) {
     return false;
 }
 middle = (left + right)/2;
 int compare = V.compareTo(A[middle]);
 System.out.println("Middle value: "+middle);
 if (compare == 0) {
     binaryOutput.setText("The book is: "+bookList[middle]);
     return true; // Missing!
 }
 if (compare < 0) {
     return binarySearch(A, left, (middle-1), V);
 } else {
     return binarySearch(A, middle + 1, right, V);
 }

Also compareTo might be implemented incorrectly.

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My guess is that either

  1. The book number that you are looking for is not in the array, or
  2. The format of book number is in such a way that its string representation has a different ordering than its integer representation.

For the second case, let me give an example. Suppose that you have three books, whose number is 1, 2, and 10. If we order these book numbers using its integer representation, we get 1, 2, and then 2. But, if we order these book numbers using its string representation (alphabetical ordering), we get 1, 10, and 2. Clearly, using binary search will not work on the latter case.

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