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Is it possible to do this?

from scapy.all import *

def action(packet):
    print packet[0][1].src + "==>" + packet[0][1].dst
    print "Rerouting to localhost"
    packet[0][1].dst = '127.0.0.1'
    print packet[0][1].src + "==>" + packet[0][1].dst
    sendp(packet)

sniff(filter="dst host 203.105.78.163",prn=action)

Something like this but is there a way to send the packet to localhost and drop the packet being sent to 203.105.78.163? (not using iptables)

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

There is no way to do this, because Scapy sniffs packets without interfering with the host's IP stack.

You could send another packet based on a sniffed packet, but you cannot "drop the packet" with Scapy.

The only solution I can think of, under Linux, involves iptables + libnfqueue and its Python bindings + Scapy. But obviously, if you just want to reroute a packet, iptables alone is enough, and much better.

Under any other OS, you need anyway to have some kind of firewall software to either pass the packet to a userland program (like libnfqueue under Linux, here you can do your Scapy magic) or tamper the packet itself.

Maybe you could have a look at IPS softwares (suricata?), since tampering packets based on some criteria is what does an IPS.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm on Windows :( – Takkun Jun 10 '14 at 1:18
    
Sorry ;-). I've updated my answer. – Pierre Jun 11 '14 at 21:37

Something like this should work, though it's not the prettiest:

from scapy.all import *

def action(packet):
    if not "203.105.78.163" in packet[0][1].src and not "203.105.78.163" in packet[0][1].dst:
        print packet[0][1].src + "==>" + packet[0][1].dst
        print "Rerouting to localhost"
        packet[0][1].dst = '127.0.0.1'
        print packet[0][1].src + "==>" + packet[0][1].dst
        sendp(packet)
share|improve this answer
    
Pretty sure this won't do what the question is asking for, because scapy just sniffs copies of packets and can't cause the original to be dropped. – Andrew Medico Jun 9 '14 at 22:51

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