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Given:

Applicative m, Monad m => mf :: m (a -> b), ma :: m a

it seems to be considered a law that:

mf <*> ma === do { f <- mf; a <- ma; return (f a) }

or more concisely:

(<*>) === ap

The documentation for Control.Applicative says that <*> is "sequential application," and that suggests that (<*>) = ap. This means that <*> must evaluate effects sequentially from left to right, for consistency with >>=... But that feels wrong. McBride and Paterson's original paper seems to imply that the left-to-right sequencing is arbitrary:

The IO monad, and indeed any Monad, can be made Applicative by taking pure = return and <*> = ap. We could alternatively use the variant of ap that performs the computations in the opposite order, but we shall keep to the left-to-right order in this paper.

So there are two lawful, non-trivial derivations for <*> that follow from >>= and return, with distinct behavior. And in some cases, neither of these two derivations are desirable.

For example, the (<*>) === ap law forces Data.Validation to define two distinct data types: Validation and AccValidation. The former has a Monad instance similar to ExceptT, and a consistent Applicative instance which is of limited utility, since it stops after the first error. The latter, on the other hand, doesn't define a Monad instance, and is therefore free to implement an Applicative that, much more usefully, accumulates errors.

There's been some discussion about this previously on StackOverflow, but I don't think it really got to the meat of the question:

Why should this be a law?

The other laws for functors, applicatives and monads—such as identity, associativity, etc.—express some fundamental, mathematical properties of those structures. We can implement various optimizations using these laws and prove things about our own code using them. In contrast, it feels to me like the (<*>) === ap law imposes an arbitrary constraint with no corresponding benefit.

For what it's worth, I'd prefer to ditch the law in favor of something like this:

newtype LeftA m a = LeftA (m a)
instance Monad m => Applicative (LeftA m) where
  pure = return
  mf <*> ma = do { f <- mf; a <- ma; return (f a) }

newtype RightA m a = RightA (m a)
instance Monad m => Applicative (RightA m) where
  pure = return
  mf <*> ma = do { a <- ma; f <- mf; return (f a) }

I think that correctly captures the relationship between the two, without unduly constraining either.

So, a few angles to approach the question from:

  • Are there any other laws relating Monad and Applicative?
  • Is there any inherent mathematical reason for effects to sequence for Applicative in the same way that they do for Monad?
  • Does GHC or any other tool perform code transformations that assume/require this law to be true?
  • Why is the Functor-Applicative-Monad proposal considered such an overwhelmingly good thing? (Citations would be much appreciated here).

And one bonus question:

  • How do Alternative and MonadPlus fit in to all this?

Note: major edit to clarify the meat of the question. Answer posted by @duplode quotes an earlier version.

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2  
The order of evaluation of <*> is not important if the applicative is not effectful. But if it is also a (non trivial) monad, then it must be effectful. You could do something stupid like throw away effects from the left arguement, but if you have a monad, ap is a "natural" definition for <*>. But there is no inherent need requirements for the ordering of effects for applicatives, whereas there obviously is for monads. –  user2407038 Jun 9 '14 at 2:40
    
"if you have a monad, ap is a "natural" definition for <*>." I'd suggest it's one of two possible natural derivations, the choice between which is arbitrary. –  mergeconflict Jun 9 '14 at 2:49
    
... And, I should say, in some cases I don't necessarily want either of these two derivations, but a distinct implementation entirely (as in AccValidation). –  mergeconflict Jun 9 '14 at 2:55
6  
You would probably be interested in Control.Applicative.Backwards –  Gabriel Gonzalez Jun 9 '14 at 3:18
1  
On the LeftA/RightA idea: there are comparable cases elsewhere in the standard libraries (e.g. Sum and Product in Data.Monoid). The problem of doing the same with Applicative is that the power-to-weight relation is too low to justify the extra precision/flexibility. The newtypes would make applicative style a lot less pleasant to use. That you can easily recover the RightA instance from the LeftA one (ergo Backwards and (<**>)) only compounds the issue. –  duplode Jun 9 '14 at 6:32

3 Answers 3

and in my own (perhaps mistaken) intuition, given pure f <*> ma <*> mb, there needn't be any predetermined sequencing since none of the values depend on each other.

The values don't, but the effects do. (<*>) :: t (a -> b) -> t a -> t b means that you have to somehow combine the effects of the arguments in order to get the overall effects. Whether the combination will be commutative or not depends on how the instance is defined. For example, the instance for Maybe is commutative, while the default, "cross join" instance for lists isn't. Therefore, there are cases in which you can't avoid imposing some order.

What are the laws, if any, relating Monad and Applicative?

While it is fair to say that pure === return and (<*>) === ap (quoting Control.Applicative) aren't laws in the strong sense that e.g. the monad laws are so, they help keeping the instances unsurprising. Given that every Monad gives rise to an instance of Applicative (actually two instances, as you point out), it is natural that the actual instance of Applicative matches what Monad gives us. As for the left-to-right convention, following the order of ap and liftM2 (which already existed back when Applicative was introduced, and which mirror the order imposed by (>>=)) was a sensible decision. (Note that, if we ignored for a moment how much (>>=) matters in practice, the opposite choice would be defensible as well, as it would make (<*>) and (=<<), which have analogous types, sequence effects in the same order.)

Does GHC or any other tool perform code transformations that assume/require this law to be true?

That sounds very unlikely given that Applicative isn't even a superclass of Monad(yet). These "laws", however, allow readers of the code to make the transformations, which matters just as much.

N.B.: If you need to reverse the sequencing of effects in an Applicative instance, there is Control.Applicative.Backwards, as Gabriel Gonzalez has pointed out. Also, (<**>) flips the arguments but still sequences effects from left to right, so it can also be used to reverse sequencing. Similarly, (<*) is not flip (*>), as both sequence effects from left to right.

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I just submitted a pretty big edit to attempt to clarify my question... It's really less about why choose left-to-right over right-to-left, and more: why relate Monad and Applicative in this way at all? I can imagine providing a pair of newtypes à la Control.Applicative.Backwards that provide instances of <*> based on >>=, but making Applicative a superclass of Monad seems too strong. –  mergeconflict Jun 9 '14 at 5:55
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@mergeconflict The mathematical relationship goes in the other direction: return and ap follow the applicative laws, just like both \f u -> pure f <*> u and \f m -> m >>= return . f follow the functor laws. The Applicative-Monad Proposal reflects those facts. Now, if multiple instances are possible only one of them will be canonical, the others being relegated to newtypes. The simplest choice is picking the matching set of instances. It makes it easier to reason about code, and may even give instances for free (e.g. by starting with Monadand then defining (<*>) = ap, etc). –  duplode Jun 9 '14 at 6:25
    
The fact that you get instances for free is great, but only to the extent that they're the instances you want. If parametricity gives you an instance that's really the only sensible one—as it does when deriving Functor, for example—then that's a safe bet. That's not the case here, so although one instance seems more obvious than others, that still doesn't feel sufficient to enforce it. –  mergeconflict Jun 10 '14 at 6:20

Among other things, you ask why is the Functor-Applicative-Monad proposal a good thing. One reason is because the lack of unity means there is a lot of duplication of API. Consider the standard Control.Monad module. The following are the functions in that module that essentially use the Monad (there are none for MonadPlus) constraint:

(>>=) fail (=<<) (>=>) (<=<) join foldM foldM_

The following are the functions in that module where a Monad/MonadPlus constraint could as far as I can tell easily be relaxed to Applicative/Alternative:

(>>) return mzero mplus mapM mapM_ forM forM_ sequence sequence_ forever
msum filterM mapAndUnzipM zipWithM zipWithM_ replicateM replicateM_ guard
when unless liftM liftM2 liftM3 liftM4 liftM5 ap

Many of the latter group do have Applicative or Alternative versions, in either Control.Applicative, Data.Foldable or Data.Traversable – but why need to learn all that duplication in the first place?

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This seems more a matter of convenience than correctness. It seems natural that Functor should be a superclass of both Monad (where fmap f fa === fa >>= return . f) and Applicative (where fmap f fa === pure f <*> fa). It also makes sense that return === pure, so it follows that fa >>= pure . f === pure f <*> fa. But I don't think it follows that <*> === ap. –  mergeconflict Jun 9 '14 at 17:46
2  
Of course it doesn't follow. It's a choice. Why do you think it's a bad choice? When is it good to make the obvious Moggi-style translation of the applicative notation a dangerous misreading? –  pigworker Jun 9 '14 at 23:51
    
In many cases it's not a bad choice; as most have noted, it's the obvious choice! But that alone doesn't feel like sufficient grounds for a law; it still seems like a choice best made case-by-case. My favorite example again: a Validation data type with an Applicative instance that accumulates errors in a semigroup and a Monad instance that does not. I don't see why there should be a law forbidding this. –  mergeconflict Jun 10 '14 at 5:50
    
@mergeconflict Consistency, understandability, simplicity and API streamlining. Taking all of that into account, an extra type for the special cases in which you want something other than the obvious instance is a small price to pay. Given a well-designed library, it will be painless to switch between the instances if need be - your example package, for instance, provides convenient isomorphisms between Validation, AccValidation and Either. –  duplode Jun 10 '14 at 13:51
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Well, I'm not terribly satisfied with the answers given so far, but I think the comments attached to them are a bit more compelling. So I'll summarize here:


I think there's only one sensible Functor instance that follows from Applicative:

fmap f fa = pure f <*> fa

Assuming that's unique, it makes sense that Functor should be a superclass of Applicative, with that law. Likewise, I think there's only one sensible Functor instance that follows from Monad:

fmap f fa = fa >>= return . f

So again, it makes sense that Functor should be a superclass of Monad. The objection I had (and, really, still have) is that there are two sensible Applicative instances that follow from Monad and, in some specific instances, even more that are lawful; so why mandate one?

pigworker (first author on the original Applicative paper) writes:

"Of course it doesn't follow. It's a choice."

(on twitter): "do-notation is unjust punishment for working in a monad; we deserve applicative notation"

duplode similarly writes:

"... it is fair to say that pure === return and (<*>) === ap aren't laws in the strong sense that e.g. the monad laws are so ..."

"On the LeftA/RightA idea: there are comparable cases elsewhere in the standard libraries (e.g. Sum and Product in Data.Monoid). The problem of doing the same with Applicative is that the power-to-weight relation is too low to justify the extra precision/flexibility. The newtypes would make applicative style a lot less pleasant to use."

So, I'm happy to see that choice stated explicitly, justified by the simple reasoning that it makes the most common cases easier.

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Functor instances are indeed unique. You can use free theorems to prove that, modulo non-termination shenanigans, all law-abiding implementations of fmap for a type constructor do the same thing. –  duplode Jun 11 '14 at 17:08
    
I love "do-notation is unjust punishment for working in a monad; we deserve applicative notation". –  AndrewC Sep 14 '14 at 20:04

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