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I was recently working with a DateTime object, and wrote something like this:

DateTime dt = DateTime.Now;
dt.AddDays(1);
return dt; // still today's date! WTF?

The intellisense documentation for AddDays() says it adds a day to the date, which it doesn't - it actually returns a date with a day added to it, so you have to write it like:

DateTime dt = DateTime.Now;
dt = dt.AddDays(1);
return dt; // tomorrow's date

This one has bitten me a number of times before, so I thought it would be useful to catalog the worst C# gotchas.

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131  
return DateTime.Now.AddDays(1); –  crashmstr Oct 27 '08 at 19:38
17  
AFAIK, the built in value types are all immutable, at least in that any method included with the type returns a new item rather than modifying the existing item. At least, I can't think of one off the top of my head that doesn't do this: all nice and consistent. –  Joel Coehoorn Oct 27 '08 at 19:39
6  
Mutable value type: System.Collections.Generics.List.Enumerator :( (And yes, you can see it behaving oddly if you try hard enough.) –  Jon Skeet Oct 27 '08 at 19:48
11  
The intellisense gives you all the info you need. It says it returns a DateTime object. If it just altered the one you passed in, it would be a void method. –  John Kraft Oct 27 '08 at 21:50
18  
Not necessarily: StringBuilder.Append(...) returns "this" for example. That's quite common in fluent interfaces. –  Jon Skeet Oct 27 '08 at 22:49
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62 Answers

up vote 225 down vote accepted
private int myVar;
public int MyVar
{
    get { return MyVar; }
}

Blammo. Your app crashes with no stack trace. Happens all the time.

(Notice capital MyVar instead of lowercase myVar in the getter)

share|improve this answer
81  
and SO appropriate for this site :) –  gbjbaanb Oct 27 '08 at 23:18
48  
I put underscores on the private member, helps a lot! –  chakrit Oct 28 '08 at 0:00
50  
I use automatic properties where I can, stops this kind of problem alot ;) –  TWith2Sugars Dec 19 '08 at 15:50
23  
This is a GREAT reason to use prefixes for your private fields (there are others, but this is a good one): _myVar, m_myVar –  jrista Jun 26 '09 at 8:01
159  
@jrista: O please NO... not m_ ... aargh the horror... –  fretje Jun 26 '09 at 8:14
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Type.GetType

The one which I've seen bite lots of people is Type.GetType(string). They wonder why it works for types in their own assembly, and some types like System.String, but not System.Windows.Forms.Form. The answer is that it only looks in the current assembly and in mscorlib.


Anonymous methods

C# 2.0 introduced anonymous methods, leading to nasty situations like this:

using System;
using System.Threading;

class Test
{
    static void Main()
    {
        for (int i=0; i < 10; i++)
        {
            ThreadStart ts = delegate { Console.WriteLine(i); };
            new Thread(ts).Start();
        }
    }
}

What will that print out? Well, it entirely depends on the scheduling. It will print 10 numbers, but it probably won't print 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 which is what you might expect. The problem is that it's the i variable which has been captured, not its value at the point of the creation of the delegate. This can be solved easily with an extra local variable of the right scope:

using System;
using System.Threading;

class Test
{
    static void Main()
    {
        for (int i=0; i < 10; i++)
        {
            int copy = i;
            ThreadStart ts = delegate { Console.WriteLine(copy); };
            new Thread(ts).Start();
        }
    }
}


Deferred execution of iterator blocks

This "poor man's unit test" doesn't pass - why not?

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Diagnostics;

class Test
{
    static IEnumerable<char> CapitalLetters(string input)
    {
        if (input == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException(input);
        }
        foreach (char c in input)
        {
            yield return char.ToUpper(c);
        }
    }

    static void Main()
    {
        // Test that null input is handled correctly
        try
        {
            CapitalLetters(null);
            Console.WriteLine("An exception should have been thrown!");
        }
        catch (ArgumentNullException)
        {
            // Expected
        }
    }
}

The answer is that the code within the source of the CapitalLetters code doesn't get executed until the iterator's MoveNext() method is first called.

I've got some other oddities on my brainteasers page.

share|improve this answer
15  
The iterator example is devious! –  Jimmy Oct 27 '08 at 19:49
8  
why not split this into 3 answer so we can vote each one up instead of all together? –  chakrit Oct 28 '08 at 0:04
8  
@chakrit: In retrospect, that would probably have been a good idea, but I think it's too late now. It might also have looked like I was just trying to get more rep... –  Jon Skeet Oct 28 '08 at 6:20
16  
Actually Type.GetType works if you provide the AssemblyQualifiedName. Type.GetType("System.ServiceModel.EndpointNotFoundException, System.ServiceModel, Version=3.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089"); –  chilltemp Oct 28 '08 at 20:23
2  
@FosterZ: It's creating a delegate of type ThreadStart which prints the current value of i to the console. –  Jon Skeet May 31 '11 at 6:34
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Re-throwing exceptions

A gotcha that gets lots of new developers, is the re-throw exception semantics.

Lots of time I see code like the following

catch(Exception e) 
{
   // Do stuff 
   throw e; 
}

The problem is that it wipes the stack trace and makes diagnosing issues much harder, cause you can not track where the exception originated.

The correct code is either the throw statement with no args:

catch(Exception)
{
    throw;
}

Or wrapping the exception in another one, and using inner exception to get the original stack trace:

catch(Exception e) 
{
   // Do stuff 
   throw new MySpecialException(e); 
}
share|improve this answer
12  
@Kyralessa: there are many cases: for instance, if you want to rollback a transaction, before the caller gets the exception. You rollback and then rethrow. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Sep 10 '09 at 8:55
5  
I see this all the time where people catch and rethrow exceptions just because they are taught that they must catch all exceptions, not realising that it will be caught further up the call stack. It drives me nuts. –  James Westgate May 5 '10 at 12:55
3  
@Kyralessa the biggest case is when you have to do logging. Log the error in catch, and rethrow.. –  nawfal Apr 10 '13 at 11:53
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The Heisenberg Watch Window

This can bite you badly if you're doing load-on-demand stuff, like this:

private MyClass _myObj;
public MyClass MyObj {
  get {
    if (_myObj == null)
      _myObj = CreateMyObj(); // some other code to create my object
    return _myObj;
  }
}

Now let's say you have some code elsewhere using this:

// blah
// blah
MyObj.DoStuff(); // Line 3
// blah

Now you want to debug your CreateMyObj() method. So you put a breakpoint on Line 3 above, with intention to step into the code. Just for good measure, you also put a breakpoint on the line above that says _myObj = CreateMyObj();, and even a breakpoint inside CreateMyObj() itself.

The code hits your breakpoint on Line 3. You step into the code. You expect to enter the conditional code, because _myObj is obviously null, right? Uh... so... why did it skip the condition and go straight to return _myObj?! You hover your mouse over _myObj... and indeed, it does have a value! How did THAT happen?!

The answer is that your IDE caused it to get a value, because you have a "watch" window open - especially the "Autos" watch window, which displays the values of all variables/properties relevant to the current or previous line of execution. When you hit your breakpoint on Line 3, the watch window decided that you would be interested to know the value of MyObj - so behind the scenes, ignoring any of your breakpoints, it went and calculated the value of MyObj for you - including the call to CreateMyObj() that sets the value of _myObj!

That's why I call this the Heisenberg Watch Window - you cannot observe the value without affecting it... :)

GOTCHA!


Edit - I feel @ChristianHayter's comment deserves inclusion in the main answer, because it looks like an effective workaround for this issue. So anytime you have a lazy-loaded property...

Decorate your property with [DebuggerBrowsable(DebuggerBrowsableState.Never)] or [DebuggerDisplay("")]. – Christian Hayter

share|improve this answer
7  
brilliant find! you're not a programmer, you're a real debugger. –  this. __curious_geek Apr 28 '10 at 16:41
17  
I've run into this even hovering over the variable, not just the watch window. –  Richard Morgan May 14 '10 at 20:43
2  
Awesome name :D –  Camilo Martin Feb 15 '13 at 19:57
16  
Decorate your property with [DebuggerBrowsable(DebuggerBrowsableState.Never)] or [DebuggerDisplay("<loaded on demand>")]. –  Christian Hayter Apr 9 '13 at 20:31
2  
If you are developing a framework class and want watch window functionality without altering the runtime behavior of a lazily-constructed property, you can use a debugger type proxy to return the value if it's already been constructed, and a message that the property hasn't been constructed if that's the case. The Lazy<T> class (in particular for its Value property) is one example of where this is used. –  280Z28 May 14 '13 at 15:16
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Here's another time one that gets me:

static void PrintHowLong(DateTime a, DateTime b)
{
    TimeSpan span = a - b;
    Console.WriteLine(span.Seconds);        // WRONG!
    Console.WriteLine(span.TotalSeconds);   // RIGHT!
}

TimeSpan.Seconds is the seconds portion of the timespan (2 minutes and 0 seconds has a seconds value of 0).

TimeSpan.TotalSeconds is the entire timespan measured in seconds (2 minutes has a total seconds value of 120).

share|improve this answer
3  
That one has burned me before. –  Kalid Nov 1 '08 at 20:04
2  
Burned me last month. Ow. –  Dave Markle Dec 23 '08 at 3:05
9  
You should add a comment explaining why it's wrong. I'm pretty sure it's because the timespan is probably stored like 2min30 seconds and that .Seconds returns 30 and .TotalSeconds returns 150. –  mbillard Jan 31 '10 at 16:41
1  
On re-reading this, I have to wonder why TimeSpan even has a Seconds property at all. Who gives a rat's ass what the seconds portion of a timespan is, anyway? It's an arbitrary, unit-dependent value; I can't conceive of any practical use for it. –  MusiGenesis Oct 8 '10 at 22:48
5  
@MusiGenesis the property is useful. What if I want to display timespan broken out in pieces? E.g. let's say your Timespan represents duration of '3 hours 15 minutes 10 seconds'. How can you access this information without Seconds, Hours, Minutes properties? –  SolutionYogi May 1 '12 at 21:50
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Leaking memory because you didn't un-hook events.

This even caught out some senior developers I know.

Imagine a WPF form with lots of things in it, and somewhere in there you subscribe to an event. If you don't unsubscribe then the entire form is kept around in memory after being closed and de-referenced.

I believe the issue I saw was creating a DispatchTimer in the WPF form and subscribing to the Tick event, if you don't do a -= on the timer your form leaks memory!

In this example your teardown code should have

timer.Tick -= TimerTickEventHandler;

This one is especially tricky since you created the instance of the DispatchTimer inside the WPF form, so you would think that it would be an internal reference handled by the Garbage Collection process... unfortunately the DispatchTimer uses a static internal list of subscriptions and services requests on the UI thread, so the reference is 'owned' by the static class.

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1  
This has caught me a couple of times. –  ChrisF Oct 11 '09 at 13:34
3  
There is an MS-connect suggestion for weak reference events here which would solve this problem, though in my opinion we should just entirely replace the incredibly poor event model with a weakly-coupled one, like that used by CAB. –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Apr 28 '10 at 16:39
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If you count ASP.NET, I'd say the webforms lifecycle is a pretty big gotcha to me. I've spent countless hours debugging poorly written webforms code, just because a lot of developers just don't really understand when to use which event handler (me included, sadly).

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20  
That's why I moved to MVC... viewstate headaches... –  chakrit Oct 27 '08 at 23:56
24  
There was a whole other question devoted specifically to ASP.NET gotchas (deservedly so). The basic concept of ASP.NET (making web apps seem like windows apps for the developer) is so horribly misguided that I'm not sure it even counts as a "gotcha". –  MusiGenesis Oct 28 '08 at 0:53
1  
MusiGenesis I wish I could up vote your comment a hundred times. –  csauve Jul 22 '10 at 16:45
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Maybe not really a gotcha because the behavior is written clearly in MSDN, but has broken my neck once because I found it rather counter-intuitive:

Image image = System.Drawing.Image.FromFile("nice.pic");

This guy leaves the "nice.pic" file locked until the image is disposed. At the time I faced it I though it would be nice to load icons on the fly and didn't realize (at first) that I ended up with dozens of open and locked files! Image keeps track of where it had loaded the file from...

How to solve this? I thought a one liner would do the job. I expected an extra parameter for FromFile(), but had none, so I wrote this...

using (Stream fs = new FileStream("nice.pic", FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read))
{
    image = System.Drawing.Image.FromStream(fs);
}
share|improve this answer
7  
I agree that this behavior makes no sense. I can't find any explanation for it other than "this behavior is by design". –  MusiGenesis Oct 15 '09 at 16:04
25  
need to check some code. Brb. –  Esben Skov Pedersen Mar 12 '12 at 6:39
2  
@EsbenSkovPedersen Such a simple but funny & dry comment. Made my day. –  Inisheer Jun 6 '13 at 17:55
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overloaded == operators and untyped containers (arraylists, datasets, etc.):

string my = "my "
Debug.Assert(my+"string" == "my string"); //true

var a = new ArrayList();
a.Add(my+"string");
a.Add("my string");

// uses ==(object) instead of ==(string)
Debug.Assert(a[1] == "my string"); // true, due to interning magic
Debug.Assert(a[0] == "my string"); // false

Solutions?

  • always use string.Equals(a, b) when you are comparing string types

  • using generics like List<string> to ensure that both operands are strings.

share|improve this answer
3  
You've got extra spaces in there which make it all wrong - but if you take the spaces out, the last line will still be true as "my" + "string" is still a constant. –  Jon Skeet Oct 27 '08 at 19:58
1  
ack! you're right :) ok, I edited a bit. –  Jimmy Oct 27 '08 at 20:11
10  
Yes, one of the biggest flaws with the C# language is the == operator in class Object. They should have forced us to use ReferenceEquals. –  erikkallen Oct 11 '09 at 13:57
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DateTime.ToString("dd/MM/yyyy"); This will actually not always give you dd/MM/yyyy but instead it will take into account the regional settings and replace your date separator depending on where you are. So you might get dd-MM-yyyy or something alike.

The right way to do this is to use DateTime.ToString("dd'/'MM'/'yyyy");


DateTime.ToString("r") is supposed to convert to RFC1123, which uses GMT. GMT is within a fraction of a second from UTC, and yet the "r" format specifier does not convert to UTC, even if the DateTime in question is specified as Local.

This results in the following gotcha (varies depending on how far your local time is from UTC):

DateTime.Parse("Tue, 06 Sep 2011 16:35:12 GMT").ToString("r")
>              "Tue, 06 Sep 2011 17:35:12 GMT"

Whoops!

share|improve this answer
13  
Changed mm to MM - mm is minutes, and MM is months. Another gotcha, I guess... –  Kobi Jul 8 '09 at 11:17
1  
I could see how this would be a gotcha if you didn't know it (I didn't)...but I'm trying to figure out when you would want the behavior where you're specifically trying to print a date that doesn't match what your regional settings are. –  Beska Sep 8 '09 at 16:01
4  
@Beska: Because you are writing to a file, that needs to be in a specific format, with a specified date format. –  GvS Mar 11 '10 at 9:18
8  
I am of the opinion that the defaults being localized is worse than the other way around. At least of the developer ignored localization completely the code works on machines localized differently. This way, the code probably doesn't work. –  Joshua Apr 28 '10 at 18:06
21  
Actually I believe the correct way to do this would be DateTime.ToString("dd/MM/yyyy", CultureInfo.InvariantCulture); –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft May 14 '10 at 20:33
add comment
[Serializable]
class Hello
{
    readonly object accountsLock = new object();
}

//Do stuff to deserialize Hello with BinaryFormatter
//and now... accountsLock == null ;)

Moral of the story : Field initialisers are not run when deserializing an object

share|improve this answer
6  
Yes, I hate .NET serialization for not running the default constructor. I wish it were impossible to construct an object without calling any constructors, but alas it isn't. –  romkyns Apr 10 '11 at 11:57
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I saw this one posted the other day, and I think it is pretty obscure, and painful for those that don't know

int x = 0;
x = x++;
return x;

As that will return 0 and not 1 as most would expect

share|improve this answer
27  
I hope that wouldn't actually bite people though - I really hope they wouldn't write it in the first place! (It's interesting anyway, of course.) –  Jon Skeet Oct 27 '08 at 19:34
9  
I don't think this is very obscure... –  Chris Marasti-Georg Oct 27 '08 at 19:36
5  
At least, in C#, the results are defined, if unexpected. In C++, it could be 0 or 1, or any other result including program termination! –  James Curran Oct 27 '08 at 20:13
6  
This isn't a gotcha; x=x++ -> x = x, then increment x....x=++x -> increment x then x = x –  Kevin Oct 28 '08 at 4:10
18  
@Kevin: I don't think it's quite that simple. If x=x++ were equivalent to x=x followed by x++, then the result would be x = 1. Instead, I think what happens is first the expression to the right of the equals sign is evaluated (giving 0), then x is incremented (giving x = 1), and finally the assignment is performed (giving x = 0 once again). –  Tim Goodman Jan 28 '10 at 13:53
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I'm a bit late to this party, but I have two gotchas that have both bitten me recently:

DateTime resolution

The Ticks property measures time in 10-millionths of a second (100 nanosecond blocks), however the resolution is not 100 nanoseconds, it's about 15ms.

This code:

long now = DateTime.Now.Ticks;
for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
{
    System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(1);
    Console.WriteLine(DateTime.Now.Ticks - now);
}

will give you an output of (for example):

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
156254
156254
156254

Similarly, if you look at DateTime.Now.Millisecond, you'll get values in rounded chunks of 15.625ms: 15, 31, 46, etc.

This particular behaviour varies from system to system, but there are other resolution-related gotchas in this date/time API.


Path.Combine

A great way to combine file paths, but it doesn't always behave the way you'd expect.

If the second parameter starts with a \ character, it won't give you a complete path:

This code:

string prefix1 = "C:\\MyFolder\\MySubFolder";
string prefix2 = "C:\\MyFolder\\MySubFolder\\";
string suffix1 = "log\\";
string suffix2 = "\\log\\";

Console.WriteLine(Path.Combine(prefix1, suffix1));
Console.WriteLine(Path.Combine(prefix1, suffix2));
Console.WriteLine(Path.Combine(prefix2, suffix1));
Console.WriteLine(Path.Combine(prefix2, suffix2));

Gives you this output:

C:\MyFolder\MySubFolder\log\
\log\
C:\MyFolder\MySubFolder\log\
\log\
share|improve this answer
13  
The quantization of times in ~15ms intervals isn't because of a lack of accuracy in the underlying timing mechanism (I neglected to elaborate on this earlier). It's because your app is running inside a multi-tasking OS. Windows checks in with your app every 15ms or so, and during the little time slice it gets, your app processes all of the messages that were queued up since your last slice. All of your calls within that slice return the exact same time because they're all made at effectively the exact same time. –  MusiGenesis Jul 17 '09 at 1:53
2  
@MusiGenesis: I know (now) how it works, but it seems misleading to me to have such a precise measure which isn't really that precise. It's like saying that I know my height in nanometres when really I'm just rounding it to the nearest ten million. –  Damovisa Jul 17 '09 at 2:25
4  
DateTime is quite capable of storing up to a single tick; it's DateTime.Now that isn't using that accuracy. –  Ruben Sep 21 '09 at 23:31
10  
The extra '\' is a gotcha to many unix/mac/linux folks. In Windows, if there's a leading '\', it's mean that we want to go the drive's root (i.e. C:) try it in a CD command to see what I mean.... 1) Goto C:\Windows\System32 2) Type CD \Users 3) Woah! Now you're at C:\Users ... GOT IT? ... Path.Combine(@"C:\Windows\System32", @"\Users") should returns \Users which means precisely the [current_drive_here]:\Users –  chakrit Dec 28 '09 at 14:04
5  
Even without the 'sleep' this performs the same way. This has nothing to do with the app being scheduled every 15 ms. The native function called by DateTime.UtcNow, GetSystemTimeAsFileTime, appears to have a poor resolution. –  Jimbo Apr 28 '10 at 21:01
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When you start a process (using System.Diagnostics) that writes to the console, but you never read the Console.Out stream, after a certain amount of output your app will appear to hang.

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3  
The same can still happen when you redirect both stdout and stderr and use two ReadToEnd calls in sequence. For safe handling of both stdout and stderr you have to create a read thread for each of them. –  Sebastiaan Megens Dec 6 '09 at 11:42
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No operator shortcuts in Linq-To-Sql

See here.

In short, inside the conditional clause of a Linq-To-Sql query, you cannot use conditional shortcuts like || and && to avoid null reference exceptions; Linq-To-Sql evaluates both sides of the OR or AND operator even if the first condition obviates the need to evaluate the second condition!

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2  
TIL. BRB, re-optimizing a few hundred LINQ queries... –  tsilb Apr 19 '13 at 22:26
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Value objects in arrays

struct Point { ... }
List<Point> mypoints = ...;

mypoints[i].x = 10;

has no effect.

mypoints[i] returns a copy of a Point value object. C# happily lets you modify a field of the copy. Silently doing nothing.


Update: This appears to be fixed in C# 3.0:

Cannot modify the return value of 'System.Collections.Generic.List<Foo>.this[int]' because it is not a variable
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4  
I can see why that is confusing, considering that it does indeed work with arrays (contrary to your answer), but not with other dynamic collections, like List<Point>. –  Lasse V. Karlsen Oct 27 '08 at 22:08
1  
You're right. Thanks. I fixed my answer :). arr[i].attr= is special syntax for arrays that you cannot code in library containers ;(. Why is (<value expression>).attr = <expr> allowed at all? Can it ever make sense? –  Bjarke Ebert Oct 27 '08 at 22:30
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For C/C++ programmers, the transition to C# is a natural one. However, the biggest gotcha I've run into personally (and have seen with others making the same transition) is not fully understanding the difference between classes and structs in C#.

In C++, classes and structs are identical; they only differ in the default visibility, where classes default to private visibility and structs default to public visibility. In C++, this class definition

    class A
    {
    public:
        int i;
    };

is functionally equivalent to this struct definition.

    struct A
    {
        int i;
    };

In C#, however, classes are reference types while structs are value types. This makes a BIG difference in (1) deciding when to use one over the other, (2) testing object equality, (3) performance (e.g., boxing/unboxing), etc.

There is all kinds of information on the web related to the differences between the two (e.g., here). I would highly encourage anyone making the transition to C# to at least have a working knowledge of the differences and their implications.

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8  
So, the worst gotcha is people not bothering to take the time to learn the language before they use it? –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Aug 2 '11 at 20:43
1  
@BlueRaja-DannyPflughoeft More like the classic gotcha of apparently similar languages - they use very similar keywords and in many cases syntax, but work in a lot different way. –  Luaan Mar 27 at 16:48
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foreach loops variables scope!

var l = new List<Func<string>>();
var strings = new[] { "Lorem" , "ipsum", "dolor", "sit", "amet" };
foreach (var s in strings)
{
    l.Add(() => s);
}

foreach (var a in l)
    Console.WriteLine(a());

prints five "amet", while the following example works fine

var l = new List<Func<string>>();
var strings = new[] { "Lorem" , "ipsum", "dolor", "sit", "amet" };
foreach (var s in strings)
{
    var t = s;
    l.Add(() => t);
}

foreach (var a in l)
    Console.WriteLine(a());
share|improve this answer
9  
This is essentially equivalent to Jon's example with anonymous methods. –  LeakyCode Aug 25 '09 at 0:08
2  
Save that it is even more confusing with foreach where the "s" variable is easier to mix with scoped variable. With common for-loops the index variable clearly is the same one for each iteration. –  Mikko Rantanen Dec 6 '09 at 14:55
1  
blogs.msdn.com/ericlippert/archive/2009/11/12/… and yes, wish the variable was scoped "properly". –  romkyns Jan 12 '10 at 23:40
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Perhaps not the worst, but some parts of the .net framework use degrees while others use radians (and the documentation that appears with Intellisense never tells you which, you have to visit MSDN to find out)

All of this could have been avoided by having an Angle class instead...

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Using default parameters with virtual methods

abstract class Base
{
    public virtual void foo(string s = "base") { Console.WriteLine("base " + s); }
}

class Derived : Base
{
    public override void foo(string s = "derived") { Console.WriteLine("derived " + s); }
}

...

Base b = new Derived();
b.foo();

Output:
derived base

share|improve this answer
4  
+1 Holy hell, that is a weird old gotcha! –  Shaul Sep 2 '10 at 13:09
5  
Weird, I thought this is completely obvious. If the declared type is Base, where should the compiler get the default value from if not Base? I’d have thought it’s a bit more gotcha that the default value can be different if the declared type is the derived type, even though the method called (statically) is the base method. –  Timwi Apr 10 '11 at 12:27
1  
@FredOverflow, my question was conceptual. Although the behavior makes sense wrt the implementation, it's unintuitive and a likely source of errors. IMHO the C# compiler shouldn't allow changing default parameter values when overriding. –  staafl Mar 27 at 18:41
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The Nasty Linq Caching Gotcha

See my question that led to this discovery, and the blogger who discovered the problem.

In short, the DataContext keeps a cache of all Linq-to-Sql objects that you have ever loaded. If anyone else makes any changes to a record that you have previously loaded, you will not be able to get the latest data, even if you explicitly reload the record!

This is because of a property called ObjectTrackingEnabled on the DataContext, which by default is true. If you set that property to false, the record will be loaded anew every time... BUT... you can't persist any changes to that record with SubmitChanges().

GOTCHA!

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MS SQL Server can't handle dates before 1753. Significantly, that is out of synch with the .NET DateTime.MinDate constant, which is 1/1/1. So if you try to save a mindate, a malformed date (as recently happened to me in a data import) or simply the birth date of William the Conqueror, you're gonna be in trouble. There is no built-in workaround for this; if you're likely to need to work with dates before 1753, you need to write your own workaround.

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15  
Quite frankly I think MS SQL Server has this right and .Net is wrong. If you do the research then you know that dates prior to 1751 get funky due to calendar changes, days completely skipped, etc. Most RDBMs have some cut off point. This should give you a starting point: ancestry.com/learn/library/article.aspx?article=3358 –  Chris Lively Oct 8 '09 at 15:22
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Also, the date is 1753.. Which was pretty much the first time that we have a continuous calendar without dates being skipped. SQL 2008 introduced the Date and datetime2 datetype which can accept dates from 1/1/01 to 12/31/9999. However, date comparisons using those types should be viewed with suspicion if you are really comparing pre-1753 dates. –  Chris Lively Oct 8 '09 at 15:27
2  
Through Wikipedia on Julian Day you can find a 13 line basic program CALJD.BAS published in 1984 that can do date calculations back to about 5000 BC, taking into account leap days and the skipped days in 1753. So I do not see why "modern" systems like SQL2008 should do worse. You might not be interested in a correct date representation in the 15th century, but others might, and our software should handle this without bugs. Another issue is leap seconds . . . –  Roland Aug 23 '13 at 7:58
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Garbage collection and Dispose(). Although you don't have to do anything to free up memory, you still have to free up resources via Dispose(). This is an immensely easy thing to forget when you are using WinForms, or tracking objects in any way.

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1  
The using() block neatly solves this problem. Whenever you see a call to Dispose, you can immediately and safely refactor to use using(). –  Jeremy Frey Oct 27 '08 at 20:21
3  
I think the concern was implementing IDisposable correctly. –  Mark Brackett Oct 27 '08 at 23:16
2  
On the other hand, the using() habit can bite you unexpectedly, like when working with PInvoke. You don't want to dispose something that the API is still referencing. –  MusiGenesis Oct 28 '08 at 0:50
2  
Implementing IDisposable correctly is very hard to and understand even the best advice I have found on this (.NET Framework Guidelines) can be confusing to apply until you finally "get it". –  Quibblesome Oct 23 '09 at 13:46
1  
The best advice I ever found on IDisposable comes from Stephen Cleary, including three easy rules and an in-depth article on IDisposable –  romkyns Apr 10 '11 at 12:00
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The contract on Stream.Read is something that I've seen trip up a lot of people:

// Read 8 bytes and turn them into a ulong
byte[] data = new byte[8];
stream.Read(data, 0, 8); // <-- WRONG!
ulong data = BitConverter.ToUInt64(data);

The reason this is wrong is that Stream.Read will read at most the specified number of bytes, but is entirely free to read just 1 byte, even if another 7 bytes are available before end of stream.

It doesn't help that this looks so similar to Stream.Write, which is guaranteed to have written all the bytes if it returns with no exception. It also doesn't help that the above code works almost all the time. And of course it doesn't help that there is no ready-made, convenient method for reading exactly N bytes correctly.

So, to plug the hole, and increase awareness of this, here is an example of a correct way to do this:

    /// <summary>
    /// Attempts to fill the buffer with the specified number of bytes from the
    /// stream. If there are fewer bytes left in the stream than requested then
    /// all available bytes will be read into the buffer.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="stream">Stream to read from.</param>
    /// <param name="buffer">Buffer to write the bytes to.</param>
    /// <param name="offset">Offset at which to write the first byte read from
    ///                      the stream.</param>
    /// <param name="length">Number of bytes to read from the stream.</param>
    /// <returns>Number of bytes read from the stream into buffer. This may be
    ///          less than requested, but only if the stream ended before the
    ///          required number of bytes were read.</returns>
    public static int FillBuffer(this Stream stream,
                                 byte[] buffer, int offset, int length)
    {
        int totalRead = 0;
        while (length > 0)
        {
            var read = stream.Read(buffer, offset, length);
            if (read == 0)
                return totalRead;
            offset += read;
            length -= read;
            totalRead += read;
        }
        return totalRead;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Attempts to read the specified number of bytes from the stream. If
    /// there are fewer bytes left before the end of the stream, a shorter
    /// (possibly empty) array is returned.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="stream">Stream to read from.</param>
    /// <param name="length">Number of bytes to read from the stream.</param>
    public static byte[] Read(this Stream stream, int length)
    {
        byte[] buf = new byte[length];
        int read = stream.FillBuffer(buf, 0, length);
        if (read < length)
            Array.Resize(ref buf, read);
        return buf;
    }
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1  
Or, in your explicit example: var r = new BinaryReader(stream); ulong data = r.ReadUInt64();. BinaryReader has a FillBuffer method too... –  jimbobmcgee Jan 13 at 16:02
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Arrays implement IList

But don't implement it. When you call Add, it tells you that it doesn't work. So why does a class implement an interface when it can't support it?

Compiles, but doesn't work:

IList<int> myList = new int[] { 1, 2, 4 };
myList.Add(5);

We have this issue a lot, because the serializer (WCF) turns all the ILists into arrays and we get runtime errors.

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6  
IMHO, the problem is that Microsoft doesn't have enough interfaces defined for collections. IMHO, it should have iEnumerable, iMultipassEnumerable (supports Reset, and guarantees multiple passes will match), iLiveEnumerable (would have partially-defined semantics if the collection changes during enumeration--changes may or may not appear in enumeration, but shouldn't cause bogus results or exceptions), iReadIndexable, iReadWriteIndexable, etc. Because interfaces can "inherit" other interfaces, this wouldn't have added much extra work, if any (it would save NotImplemented stubs). –  supercat Nov 19 '10 at 0:08
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Events

I never understood why events are a language feature. They are complicated to use: you need to check for null before calling, you need to unregister (yourself), you can't find out who is registered (eg: did I register?). Why isn't an event just a class in the library? Basically a specialized List<delegate>?

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Also, multithreading is painful. All these issues but the null-thing are fixed in CAB (whose features should really just be built into the language) - events are declared globally, and any method can declare itself to be a "subscriber" of any event. My only issue with CAB is that the global event names are strings rather than enums (which could be fixed by more intelligent enums, like Java has, which inherently work as strings!). CAB is difficult to set up, but there is a simple open-source clone available here. –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Jul 9 '10 at 14:32
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I dislike the implementation of .net events. Event subscription should be handled by calling a method that adds the subscription and returns an IDisposable which, when Dispose'd, will delete the subscription. There's no need for a special construct combining an "add" and "remove" method whose semantics can be somewhat dodgy, especially if one attempts to add and later remove a multicast delegate (e.g. Add "B" followed by "AB", then remove "B" (leaving "BA") and "AB" (still leaving "BA"). Oops. –  supercat Dec 21 '11 at 1:07
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Enumerables can be evaluated more than once

It'll bite you when you have a lazily-enumerated enumerable and you iterate over it twice and get different results. (or you get the same results but it executes twice unnecessarily)

For example, while writing a certain test, I needed a few temp files to test the logic:

var files = Enumerable.Range(0, 5)
    .Select(i => Path.GetTempFileName());

foreach (var file in files)
    File.WriteAllText(file, "HELLO WORLD!");

/* ... many lines of codes later ... */

foreach (var file in files)
    File.Delete(file);

Imagine my surprise when File.Delete(file) throws FileNotFound!!

What's happening here is that the files enumerable got iterated twice (the results from the first iteration are simply not remembered) and on each new iteration you'd be re-calling Path.GetTempFilename() so you'll get a different set of temp filenames.

The solution is, of course, to eager-enumerate the value by using ToArray() or ToList():

var files = Enumerable.Range(0, 5)
    .Select(i => Path.GetTempFileName())
    .ToArray();

This is even scarier when you're doing something multi-threaded, like:

foreach (var file in files)
    content = content + File.ReadAllText(file);

and you find out content.Length is still 0 after all the writes!! You then begin to rigorously checks that you don't have a race condition when.... after one wasted hour... you figured out it's just that tiny little Enumerable gotcha thing you forgot....

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Today I fixed a bug that eluded for long time. The bug was in a generic class that was used in multi threaded scenario and a static int field was used to provide lock free synchronisation using Interlocked. The bug was caused because each instantiation of the generic class for a type has its own static. So each thread got its own static field and it wasn't used a lock as intended.

class SomeGeneric<T>
{
    public static int i = 0;
}

class Test
{
    public static void main(string[] args)
    {
        SomeGeneric<int>.i = 5;
        SomeGeneric<string>.i = 10;
        Console.WriteLine(SomeGeneric<int>.i);
        Console.WriteLine(SomeGeneric<string>.i);
        Console.WriteLine(SomeGeneric<int>.i);
    }
}

This prints 5 10 5

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you can have a non-generic base class, that defines the statics, and inherit the generics from it. Although I never fell for this behavior in C# - I still remember the long debugging hours of some C++ templates... Eww! :) –  Paulius Sep 10 '09 at 10:09
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Weird, I thought this was obvious. Just think about what it should do if i had the type T. –  Timwi Apr 10 '11 at 12:10
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TextInfo textInfo = Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentCulture.TextInfo;

textInfo.ToTitleCase("hello world!"); //Returns "Hello World!"
textInfo.ToTitleCase("hElLo WoRld!"); //Returns "Hello World!"
textInfo.ToTitleCase("Hello World!"); //Returns "Hello World!"
textInfo.ToTitleCase("HELLO WORLD!"); //Returns "HELLO WORLD!"

Yes, this behavior is documented, but that certainly doesn't make it right.

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I disagree - when a word is in all caps, it can have special meaning that you don't want to mess up with Title Case, e.g. "president of the USA" -> "President Of The USA", not "President Of The Usa". –  Shaul May 5 '10 at 12:56
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@Shaul: In which case, they should specify this as a parameter to avoid confusion, because I've never met anyone who expected this behaviour ahead of time - which makes this a gotcha! –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft May 5 '10 at 13:18
1  
OK, that's fair enough. –  Shaul May 6 '10 at 6:57
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There is a whole book on .NET Gotchas

My favourite is the one where you create a class in C#, inherit it to VB and then attempt to re-inherit back to C# and it doesnt work. ARGGH

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I dont find that a gotcha but a useful feature! –  nawfal Apr 10 '13 at 12:16
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protected by gdoron Mar 15 '13 at 1:09

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