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I was recently working with a DateTime object, and wrote something like this:

DateTime dt = DateTime.Now;
dt.AddDays(1);
return dt; // still today's date! WTF?

The intellisense documentation for AddDays() says it adds a day to the date, which it doesn't - it actually returns a date with a day added to it, so you have to write it like:

DateTime dt = DateTime.Now;
dt = dt.AddDays(1);
return dt; // tomorrow's date

This one has bitten me a number of times before, so I thought it would be useful to catalog the worst C# gotchas.

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closed as too broad by bluefeet Jul 23 at 11:28

There are either too many possible answers, or good answers would be too long for this format. Please add details to narrow the answer set or to isolate an issue that can be answered in a few paragraphs.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

132  
return DateTime.Now.AddDays(1); –  crashmstr Oct 27 '08 at 19:38
18  
AFAIK, the built in value types are all immutable, at least in that any method included with the type returns a new item rather than modifying the existing item. At least, I can't think of one off the top of my head that doesn't do this: all nice and consistent. –  Joel Coehoorn Oct 27 '08 at 19:39
6  
Mutable value type: System.Collections.Generics.List.Enumerator :( (And yes, you can see it behaving oddly if you try hard enough.) –  Jon Skeet Oct 27 '08 at 19:48
11  
The intellisense gives you all the info you need. It says it returns a DateTime object. If it just altered the one you passed in, it would be a void method. –  John Kraft Oct 27 '08 at 21:50
19  
Not necessarily: StringBuilder.Append(...) returns "this" for example. That's quite common in fluent interfaces. –  Jon Skeet Oct 27 '08 at 22:49

62 Answers 62

The DesignMode property in all UserControls does not actually tell you if you are in design mode.

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Dictionary<,>: "The order in which the items are returned is undefined". This is horrible, because it can bite you sometimes, but work others, and if you've just blindly assumed that Dictionary is going to play nice ("why shouldn't it? I thought, List does"), you really have to have your nose in it before you finally start to question your assumption.

(Similar question here.)

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10  
Of course List<T> plays nice. And use SortedDictionary<T> if the order of items matters to you. –  Allon Guralnek Aug 22 '09 at 20:52
1  
@ck, do you have a link for that? Lot's of people are going to be surprised, I believe... –  Benjol Oct 19 '09 at 5:32
3  
@ck: Wrong. List<T>.GetEnumerator does preserve order. –  SLaks Aug 19 '10 at 17:49
1  
I think @ck is suggesting that there are no guarantees implied in the contract that the enumeration will happen in order. –  Will Aug 20 '10 at 14:35

The base keyword doesn't work as expected when evaluated in a debugging environment: the method call is still executed polymorphically. This caused me a lot of grief when I stumbled across it and I thought I'd encountered some kind of rift in the CLR's space-time, but I then realized it's a known (and even somewhat intentional) bug:

http://blogs.msdn.com/jmstall/archive/2006/06/29/funceval-does-virtual-dispatch.aspx

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Just found a weird one that had me stuck in debug for a while:

You can increment null for a nullable int without throwing an excecption and the value stays null.

int? i = null;
i++; // I would have expected an exception but runs fine and stays as null
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MemoryStream.GetBuffer() vs MemoryStream.ToArray(). The former returns the whole buffer, the latter just the used portion. Yuck.

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3  
@MusiGenesis, use using(Stream stream = new ...) { } . –  tuinstoel Mar 12 '09 at 21:16

If you're coding for MOSS and you get a site reference this way:

SPSite oSiteCollection = SPContext.Current.Site;

and later in your code you say:

oSiteCollection.Dispose();

From MSDN:

If you create an SPSite object, you can use the Dispose method to close the object. However, if you have a reference to a shared resource, such as when the object is provided by the GetContextSite method or Site property (for example, SPContext.Current.Site), do not use the Dispose method to close the object, but instead allow Windows SharePoint Services or your portal application to manage the object. For more information about object disposal, see Best Practices: Using Disposable Windows SharePoint Services Objects.

This happens to every MOSS programmer and some point.

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My worst one so far I just figured out today... If you override object.Equals(object obj), you can wind up discovering that:

((MyObject)obj).Equals(this);

does not behave the same as:

((MyObject)obj) == this;

One will call your overriden function, the other will NOT.

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6  
You can override the == operator, but overriding the .Equals() won't do it for you. So you could hypothetically override both .Equals() and ==, and have them do different things :\ –  GWLlosa Jun 30 '09 at 13:09
3  
You can override Equals and overload ==. The difference is subtle but very important. More info here. stackoverflow.com/questions/1766492/… –  Samuel Neff Dec 7 '09 at 17:05

ASP.NET:

If you are using Linq-To-SQL, you call SubmitChanges() on the data context and it throws an exception (e.g. duplicate key or other constraint violation), the offending object values remain in your memory while you are debugging, and will be resubmitted every time you subsequently call SubmitChanges().

Now here's the real kicker: the bad values will remain in memory even if you push the "stop" button in your IDE and restart! I don't understand why anyone thought this was a good idea - but that little ASP.NET icon that pops up in your system tray stays running, and it appears to save your object cache. If you want to flush your memory space, you have to right-click that icon and forcibly shut it down! GOTCHA!

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1  
+1 because of the first part, no independent knowledge of the kicker. –  Maslow Oct 28 '09 at 20:46

For both LINQ-to-SQL and LINQ-to-Entities

return result = from o in table
                where o.column == null
                select o;
//Returns all rows where column is null

int? myNullInt = null;
return result = from o in table
                where o.column == myNullInt
                select o;
//Never returns anything!

There's a bug-report for LINQ-to-Entites here, though they don't seem to check that forum often. Perhaps someone should file one for LINQ-to-SQL as well?

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2  
For those who found this page due to encountering this very bug, a workaround can be found here –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Nov 8 '10 at 23:16

Static constructors are executed under lock. As a result, calling threading code from static constructor might result in deadlock. Here is an example that demonstrates it:

using System.Threading;
class Blah
{
    static void Main() { /* Won’t run because the static constructor deadlocks. */ }

    static Blah()
    {
        Thread thread = new Thread(ThreadBody);
        thread.Start();
        thread.Join();
    }

    static void ThreadBody() { }
}
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This is a super-gotcha that I wasted 2 days troubleshooting. It didn't throw any exceptions it just crashed the web-server with some weird error messages. I could not reproduce the problem in DEV. Moreover the experiments with the project build settings somehow made it go away in the PROD, then it came back. Finally I got it.

Tell me if you see a problem in the following piece of code:

    private void DumpError(Exception exception, Stack<String> context)
    {
        if (context.Any())
        {
            Trace.WriteLine(context.Pop());
            Trace.Indent();
            this.DumpError(exception, context);
            Trace.Unindent();
        }
        else
        {
            Trace.WriteLine(exception.Message);
        }
    }

So if you value your sanity:

!!! Never ever ever put any logic to Trace methods !!!

The code must have looked like this:

    private void DumpError(Exception exception, Stack<String> context)
    {
        if (context.Any())
        {
            var popped = context.Pop();
            Trace.WriteLine(popped);
            Trace.Indent();
            this.DumpError(exception, context);
            Trace.Unindent();
        }
        else
        {
            Trace.WriteLine(exception.Message);
        }
    }
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I frequently have to remind myself that DateTime is a value type, not a ref type. Just seems too weird to me, especially considering the variety of constructors for it.

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2  
I constantly type lowercase datetime all the time... luckily intellisense fix it for me :-) –  chakrit Oct 27 '08 at 23:57
3  
Why should this matter? DateTime is immutable anyway and I can't see a situation where you actually need to know if it is a reference type or not. –  Stefan Steinegger Jul 9 '10 at 16:45

The recursive property gotcha

Not specific to C#, I think, and I'm sure I've seen it mentioned elsewhere on SO (this is the question that reminded me of it)

It can happen two ways, but the end result is the same:

Forgetting to reference base. when overriding a property:

 public override bool IsRecursive
 {
     get { return IsRecursive; }
     set { IsRecursive = value; }
 }

Changing from auto- to backed- properties, but not quite going all the way:

public bool IsRecursive
{
    get { return IsRecursive; }
    set { IsRecursive = value; }
}
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2  
Not really a gotcha, just careless coding. –  Shaul Behr Sep 2 '10 at 13:06
1  
Is there a question for that? :) –  Benjol Sep 3 '10 at 4:49

Oracle parameters have to added in order

This is a major gotcha in the ODP .Net implementation of parameterized queries for Oracle.

When you add parameters to a query, the default behavior is that the parameter names are ignored, and the values are used in the order in which they were added.

The solution is to set the BindByName property of the OracleCommand object to true - it's false by default... which is qualitatively (if not quite quantitatively) something like having a property called DropDatabaseOnQueryExecution with a default value of true.

They call it a feature; I call it a pit in the public domain.

See here for more details.

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enum Seasons
{
    Spring = 1, Summer = 2, Automn = 3, Winter = 4
}

public string HowYouFeelAbout(Seasons season)
{
    switch (season)
    {
        case Seasons.Spring:
            return "Nice.";
        case Seasons.Summer:
            return "Hot.";
        case Seasons.Automn:
            return "Cool.";
        case Seasons.Winter:
            return "Chilly.";
    }
}

Error?
not all code paths return a value ...
are you kidding me? I bet all code paths do return a value because every Seasons member is mentioned here. It should have been checking all enum members and if a member was absent in switch cases then such error would be meaningful, but now I should add a Default case which is redundant and never gets reached by code.

EDIT :
after more research on this Gotcha I came to Eric Lippert's nice written and useful post but it is still kind of weird. Do you agree?

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The worst thing it happen to me was the webBrowser documentText issue:

http://geekswithblogs.net/paulwhitblog/archive/2005/12/12/62961.aspx#107062

the AllowNavigation solutions works in Windows forms...

but in compact framework the property doesn't exists...

...so far the only workaround I found was to rebuild the browser control:

http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/it-IT/netfxcompact/thread/5637037f-96fa-48e7-8ddb-6d4b1e9d7db9

But doing so, you need to handle the browser history at hands ... :P

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Linq-To-Sql and the database/local code ambiguity

Sometimes Linq just can't work out whether a certain method is meant to be executed on the DB or in local code.

See here and here for the problem statement and the solution.

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Scheduling an action to be performed later and wondering why it doesn't get invoked:

private void Schedule(Action action)
{
    new Timer(state => action, null, 60000, Timeout.Infinite);
}

If you don't save off the timer somehow, then it becomes eligible for garbage collection as soon as control leaves the Schedule() method. So everything may work fine most of the time, but every once in a while, an action will be missed.

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2  
Nice. Things like this confused when I came to Python from C++. –  Johan Lundberg May 7 '12 at 8:07

Check this one out:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var originalNumbers = new List<int> { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 };

        var list = new List<int>(originalNumbers);
        var collection = new Collection<int>(originalNumbers);

        originalNumbers.RemoveAt(0);

        DisplayItems(list, "List items: ");
        DisplayItems(collection, "Collection items: ");

        Console.ReadLine();
    }

    private static void DisplayItems(IEnumerable<int> items, string title)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(title);
        foreach (var item in items)
            Console.Write(item);
        Console.WriteLine();
    }
}

And output is:

List items: 123456
Collection items: 23456

Collection constructor that accepts IList creates a wrapper around original List, while List constructor creates a new List and copies all references from original to the new List.

See more here: http://blog.roboblob.com/2012/09/19/dot-net-gotcha-nr1-list-versus-collection-constructor/

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VisibleChanged is not usually called when Visible changes.

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1  
It seems a more fundamental problem is that "Visible" has different meanings in its getter and setter. The "Visible" property should indicate whether the control should 'try' to show itself, and a separate "CanBeSeen" property should be the 'and' if a control's own "visible" property and its parent's "CanBeSeen". –  supercat Nov 19 '10 at 0:16

LINQ to SQL and One-To-Many Relationships

This is a lovely one that has bitten me a couple times, and MS left it to one of their own developers to put it in her blog. I can't put it any better than she did, so take a look there.

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Related object and foreign key out of sync

Microsoft have admitted to this bug.

I have a class Thing, which has a FK to Category. Category does not have a defined relationship to Thing, so as not to pollute the interface.

var thing = CreateThing(); // does stuff to create a thing
var category = GetCategoryByID(123); // loads the Category with ID 123
thing.Category = category;
Console.WriteLine("Category ID: {0}", thing.CategoryID); 

Output:

Category ID: 0

Similarly:

var thing = CreateThing();
thing.CategoryID = 123;
Console.WriteLine("Category name: {0}", order.Category.Name);

throws a NullReferenceException. Related object Category does not load the Category record with ID 123.

After you submit changes to the DB, though, these values do get synched. But before you visit the DB, the FK value and related object function practically independently!

(Interestingly, the failure to synch the FK value with the related object only seems to happen when there is no child relationship defined, i.e. Category has no "Things" property. But the "load on demand" when you just set the FK value NEVER works.)

GOTCHA!

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I always thought value types were always on stack and reference types on heap.

Well it is not so. When i saw this question recently on SO (and arguably answered incorrectly) i came to know its not the case.

As Jon Skeet answered (giving a reference to Eric Lippert's Blog post ) its a Myth.

Considerably Important Links:

The truth about Value Types

References are not aAddress

The Stack is an Implementation Detail Part 1

The Stack is an Implementation Detail Part 2

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LinqToSQL and the empty set aggregate

See this question.

If you have a LinqToSql query on which you are running an aggregate - if your resultset is empty, Linq can't work out what the data type is, even though it's been declared.

e.g. Suppose you have a table Claim with a field Amount, which in LinqToSql is of type decimal.

var sum = Claims.Where(c => c.ID < 0).Sum(c => c.Amount);

Obviously no claims have an ID less than zero, so you'd expect to see sum = null, right? Wrong! You get an InvalidOperationException, because the SQL query underlying the Linq query doesn't have a data type. You have to tell Linq explicitly that it's a decimal! Thus:

var sum = Claims.Where(c => c.ID < 0).Sum(c => (decimal?)c.Amount);

This is really dumb and IMO a design bug on Microsoft's part.

GOTCHA!

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3  
No, this is just you being silly. How is .Sum() supposed to return null when you’re using decimal as the static type? –  Timwi Jan 28 '11 at 23:06

LinqToSql batches get slower with the square of the batch size

Here's the question (and answer) where I explored this problem.

In a nutshell, if you try to build up too many objects in memory before calling DataContext.SubmitChanges(), you start experiencing sluggishness at a geometric rate. I have not confirmed 100% that this is the case, but it appears to me that the call to DataContext.GetChangeSet() causes the data context to perform an equivalence evaluation (.Equals()) on every single combination of 2 items in the change set, probably to make sure it's not double-inserting or causing other concurrency issues. Problem is that if you have very large batches, the number of comparisons increases proportionately with the square of n, i.e. (n^2+n)/2. 1,000 items in memory means over 500,000 comparisons... and that can take a heckuva long time.

To avoid this, you have to ensure that for any batches where you anticipate large numbers of items, you do the whole thing within transaction boundaries, saving each individual item as it is created, rather than in one big save at the end.

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Linq2SQL: The mapping of interface member [...] is not supported.

If you do a Linq2Sql query on an object that implements an interface, you get a very odd behavior. Let's say you have a class MyClass that implements an interface IHasDescription, thus:

public interface IHasDescription {
  string Description { get; set; }
}

public partial class MyClass : IHasDescription { }

(The other half of MyClass is a Linq2Sql generated class, including the property Description.)

Now you write some code (usually this happens in a generic method):

public static T GetByDescription<T>(System.Data.Linq.Table<T> table, string desc) 
  where T : class, IHasDescription {
  return table.Where(t => t.Description == desc).FirstOrDefault();
}

Compiles fine - but you get a runtime error:

NotSupportedException: The mapping of interface member IHasDescription.Description is not supported.

Now whaddaya do about that? Well, it's obvious really: just change your == to .Equals(), thus:

return table.Where(t => t.Description.Equals(desc)).FirstOrDefault();

And everything works fine now!

See here.

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mystring.Replace("x","y")

While it looks like it should do the replacement on the string it's being invoked on it actually returns a new string with the replacements made without changing the string it's invoked on. You need to remember that strings are immutable.

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8  
It's immutable; myString is not changed, it returns a new string where 'x' has been replaced by 'y'. –  Robin Bennett Oct 28 '08 at 9:11
5  
A good convention (unfortunately not used much in .net) is to use two patterns: "string GetReplaced()" for a call that returns a copy and "void Replace()" for methods that alter the original object. The distinct behaviours/usages are then rather difficult to mix up. –  Jason Williams Jan 31 '10 at 16:40

Sometimes the line numbers in the stack trace do not match the line numbers in the source code. This might happen due to inlining of simple(single-line) functions for optimization. This is a serious source of confusion for people debugging using logs.

Edit: Example: Sometimes you see a null reference exception in the stack trace where it points to a line of code with absolutely no chance of null reference exception, like a simple integer assignment.

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Not the worst, but one that hasn't been brought up yet. Factory methods passed as arguments to System.Collections.Concurrent methods can be called multiple times even if only one return value is ever used. Considering how strongly .NET tries to protect you from spurious wake-up in threading primitives this can come as a surprise.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Collections.Concurrent;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

namespace ValueFactoryBehavingBadlyExample
{
    class Program
    {
        static ConcurrentDictionary<int, int> m_Dict = new ConcurrentDictionary<int, int>();
        static ManualResetEventSlim m_MRES = new ManualResetEventSlim(false);
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            for (int i = 0; i < 8; ++i)
            {
                Task.Factory.StartNew(ThreadGate, TaskCreationOptions.LongRunning);
            }
            Thread.Sleep(1000);
            m_MRES.Set();
            Thread.Sleep(1000);
            Console.WriteLine("Dictionary Size: " + m_Dict.Count);
            Console.Read();
        }

        static void ThreadGate()
        {
            m_MRES.Wait();
            int value = m_Dict.GetOrAdd(0, ValueFactory);
        }

        static int ValueFactory(int key)
        {
            Thread.Sleep(1000);
            Console.WriteLine("Value Factory Called");
            return key;
        }
    }
}

(Possible) Output:

Value Factory Called
Value Factory Called
Value Factory Called
Value Factory Called
Dictionary Size: 0
Value Factory Called
Value Factory Called
Value Factory Called
Value Factory Called
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Passing a capacity to List<int> instead of using the collection initializer.

        var thisOnePasses = new List<int> {2}; // collection initializer
        var thisOneFails = new List<int> (2);  // oops, use capacity by mistake #gotcha#

        thisOnePasses.Count.Should().Be(1);
        thisOnePasses.First().Should().Be(2);

        thisOneFails.Count.Should().Be(1);     // it's zero
        thisOneFails.First().Should().Be(2);   // Sequence contains no elements...
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