Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So I have a tuple that I want to pass as the parameters for a case class in Scala. For case classes without type parameters, this is easy, as I can do:

 scala> case class Foo(a: Int, b: Int)
 defined class Foo

 scala> (Foo.apply _)
 res0: (Int, Int) => Foo = <function2>

 scala> val tuple = (1, 2)
 tuple: (Int, Int) = (1,2)

 scala> res0.tupled(tuple)
 res1: Foo = Foo(1,2)

 scala> Foo.tupled(tuple)
 res2: Foo = Foo(1,2)

However, if the case class has a type parameter, it doesn't seem to work:

scala> (Bar.apply _)
res26: (Nothing, Nothing) => Bar[Nothing] = <function2>

scala> res26.tupled(tuple)
<console>:18: error: type mismatch;
 found   : (Int, Int)
 required: (Nothing, Nothing)
              res26.tupled(tuple)
                           ^
scala> (Bar[Int].apply _)
<console>:16: error: missing arguments for method apply in object Bar;
follow this method with `_' if you want to treat it as a partially applied function
              (Bar[Int].apply _)

scala> Bar.tupled(tuple)
<console>:17: error: value tupled is not a member of object Bar
              Bar.tupled(tuple)
                  ^

scala> Bar[Int].tupled(tuple)
<console>:17: error: missing arguments for method apply in object Bar;
follow this method with `_' if you want to treat it as a partially applied function
              Bar[Int].tupled(tuple)
                 ^

How do I partially apply a case class with a type parameter? I'm using Scala 2.10.3.

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This appears to work:

scala> case class Foo[X](a:X, b: X)
defined class Foo

scala> Foo.apply[Int] _
res1: (Int, Int) => Foo[Int] = <function2>

scala> 
share|improve this answer
    
The only permutation I didn't try :p –  cdmckay Jun 9 at 4:25
    
The thing to realize is that Foo is an object, and objects can't have type parameters, only classes and functions can. –  Urban Vagabond Jun 9 at 4:39
1  
Wouldn't it be more accurate to say that only classes and methods can have type parameters? This is my understanding from reading some of the documentation behind Shapeless (chuusai.com/2012/04/27/shapeless-polymorphic-function-values-1) –  acjay Jun 9 at 4:48
    
Yeah I'm being sloppy when I say "function" for "method". –  Urban Vagabond Jun 9 at 5:02
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.