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Can someine show me a simple deadlock program or nunit test in c#?

Something that creates the threads too please.

Thanks

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closed as not constructive by casperOne Jul 25 '12 at 13:05

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4  
Is this homework? –  Kent Boogaart Mar 9 '10 at 18:18
    
He didn't tagged it as homework. –  zgnilec Apr 8 '13 at 1:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 15 down vote accepted
static object object1 = new object();
static object object2 = new object();

public static void ObliviousFunction()
{
    lock (object1)
    {
        Thread.Sleep(1000); // Wait for the blind to lead
        lock (object2)
        {
        }
    }
}

public static void BlindFunction()
{
    lock (object2)
    {
        Thread.Sleep(1000); // Wait for oblivion
        lock (object1)
        {
        }
    }
}

static void Main()
{
    Thread thread1 = new Thread((ThreadStart)ObliviousFunction);
    Thread therad2 = new Thread((ThreadStart)BlindFunction);

    thread1.Start();
    thread2.Start();

    while (true)
    {
        // Stare at the two threads in deadlock.
    }
}
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+1, I came to this question to describe something like this. Order of lock acquisition is a very common concern in practice. Rule of thumb: if you need to have 2 locks held at the same time they should be acquired and released in a predictable and consistent order. –  asveikau Mar 9 '10 at 18:40

From Threading in C#

At the other end of the scale, separate synchronization contexts invite deadlocks. Here's an example:

[Synchronization]
public class Deadlock : ContextBoundObject {
    public DeadLock Other;
    public void Demo() { Thread.Sleep (1000); Other.Hello(); }
    void Hello() { Console.WriteLine ("hello"); }
}
public class Test {
    static void Main() {
    Deadlock dead1 = new Deadlock();
    Deadlock dead2 = new Deadlock();
    dead1.Other = dead2;
    dead2.Other = dead1;
    new Thread (dead1.Demo).Start();
    dead2.Demo();
}

Because each instance of Deadlock is created within Test – an unsynchronized class – each instance will gets its own synchronization context, and hence, its own lock. When the two objects call upon each other, it doesn't take long for the deadlock to occur (one second, to be precise!) The problem would be particularly insidious if the Deadlock and Test classes were written by different programming teams. It may be unreasonable to expect those responsible for the Test class to be even aware of their transgression, let alone know how to go about resolving it. This is in contrast to explicit locks, where deadlocks are usually more obvious.

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