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How do I overwrite the setter of stored property in Swift?

In Obj-C, I can overwrite its setter, but Swift doesn't seem to be happy about getter/setters being used for stored property.

Say I have a Card class with a property called rank. I don't want the client to give it any invalid value, therefore, in objective-C, I can overwrite setRank so that it performs additional check. But willSet in Swift doesn't seem to help because newValue is constant and it makes no sense to assign rank because setter will be called in a loop.

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Have you found a way of doing this? I need this kind of functionality myself... –  Mihai Fratu Jun 20 '14 at 18:57
    
I found it. Check out my answer... –  Mihai Fratu Jun 20 '14 at 19:04
    
What about didGet or analog? –  fnc12 May 17 at 13:03

4 Answers 4

up vote 47 down vote accepted

Ok. Reading trough Apples documentation on Swift I found this:

If you assign a value to a property within its own didSet observer, the new value that you assign will replace the one that was just set.

So all you have to do is this:

var rank: Int = 0 {
    didSet {
        // Say 1000 is not good for you and 999 is the maximum you want to be stored there
        if rank >= 1000  {
            rank = 999
        }
    }
}
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What about didGet or analog? –  fnc12 May 17 at 13:04
    
Not sure I understand your question. Can you be more specific, please? –  Mihai Fratu May 18 at 6:44
    
I need to invoke some code before getting. I was able to perform this in obj-c but I cannot see how to perform this in Swift. The only thing I see is to use two properties: one is public and one is private, public invokes my code and return private property's value. That is why I asked about didGet –  fnc12 May 19 at 6:48
    
You can only have a getter for a computed property. For example var rankTimesTwo: Int { get { return rank * 2 } } –  Mihai Fratu May 19 at 11:38

You can't override get/set for a stored property but you can use property observers willSet/didSet:

var totalSteps: Int = 0 {
    willSet(newTotalSteps) {
        println("About to set totalSteps to \(newTotalSteps)")
    }
    didSet {
        if totalSteps > oldValue  {
            println("Added \(totalSteps - oldValue) steps")
        }
    }
}

The default parameter names are newValue for willSet and oldValue for didSet, or you can name them yourself as in willSet(newTotalSteps).

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This works. But doesn't solve my problem, maybe I wasn't clear enough in my original question. –  bohanl Jun 10 '14 at 6:17
    
Say I have a Card class with a property called rank. I don't want the client to give it any value, therefore, in objective-C, I can overwrite setRank so it performs additional check. But willSet in Swift doesn't seem to help because newValue is constant and it makes no sense to assign rank because setter will be called in a loop. –  bohanl Jun 10 '14 at 6:19
2  
I'm not entirely sure what you mean but couldn't you use didSet to check rank after it gets set and if it fails validation, reset it to something else e.g. oldValue? –  Joseph Mark Jun 10 '14 at 7:16

get and set are for computed properties (they don't have any backing store). (In my opinion, the keyword 'var' is confusing here)

  • willSet and didSet are called for an instance variable (Use didSet to override any changes)
  • set and get are purely for computed properties
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Simplified Example:

class Shape {
    var sideLength: Double {
    get {
        return self.sideLength
    }
    set {
        // Implement the setter here.
        self.sideLength = newValue
    }
    }
}

Full example

Check out perimeter in this example.

Excerpt From: Apple Inc. “The Swift Programming Language.” iBooks. https://itun.es/us/jEUH0.l

class EquilateralTriangle: NamedShape {
    var sideLength: Double = 0.0

    init(sideLength: Double, name: String) {
        self.sideLength = sideLength
        super.init(name: name)
        numberOfSides = 3
    }

    var perimeter: Double {
    get {
        return 3.0 * sideLength
    }
    set {
        sideLength = newValue / 3.0
    }
    }

    override func simpleDescription() -> String {
        return "An equilateral triagle with sides of length \(sideLength)."
    }
}
var triangle = EquilateralTriangle(sideLength: 3.1, name: "a triangle")
triangle.perimeter
triangle.perimeter = 9.9
triangle.sideLength”
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1  
in this case, perimeter is still a computed property. How do I overwrite sideLength without introducing a computed property? –  bohanl Jun 9 '14 at 6:34
    
@bohanl I've added a simplified example using get and set –  Michael Rapadas Jun 9 '14 at 6:38
4  
Your "full example" shows a computed property, not a stored property, and your "simplified example" doesn't work. –  Caleb Jun 9 '14 at 14:06
    
I stand corrected. It's as if the abstraction of @property(auto-synthesized getters+setters) in Objective-C has been unabstracted in Swift. The irony... –  Michael Rapadas Jun 9 '14 at 19:34
3  
You're "simplified example" is calling a getter within a getter of itself. Inf loop... crash. –  jakenberg Nov 4 '14 at 1:05

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