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Below is my code, where I'm passing my array named a to a display function which will just display the array.

I'm getting an invalid type argument of type unary * error on this statement printf("Arr[%d][%d] is %d\n",i,j,*(*(q+i)+j));

However, the commented code prints the values properly. Can you please explain what wrong am I doing? I'm new to C so forgive me if it's a silly mistake/error.

#include <stdio.h>
void display(int *, int, int);
int main()
{
    int a[3][4] = {
                            {1,2,3,4},
                            {5,6,7,8},
                            {9,10,11,12}
                            };
    display(a,3,4);
    /*
    int i,j;

    for(i=0; i<3; i++)
        {
            for(j=0; j<4; j++)
                printf("Arr[%d][%d] is %d\n",i,j,*(*(a+i)+j));
        }
    */
    return 0;
}
void display(int *q, int row, int col)
{
    int i,j;

    for(i=0; i<row; i++)
        {
            for(j=0; j<col; j++)
                printf("Arr[%d][%d] is %d\n",i,j,*(*(q+i)+j));
        }
}
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4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

In general, to pass 2D arrays to functions you need to specify the array dimensions for all but the first dimension, so in this example you need the [4] for the last dimension but you can optionally omit it for the first dimension, i.e.

void display( int (*q)[4], int row, int col)

And make above declaration as follows

void display(int (*)[], int, int);
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, exactly what I was looking for! But could you please tell me what does (*q) mean? I understand that the last dimension is needed, but what's that (*q) for? –  NirAv JaIn Jun 9 '14 at 7:30
    
If you specify the dimension, you don't need the array pointer syntax. void display( int q[][4], int row, int col) might be easier to read. –  Lundin Jun 9 '14 at 7:40
    
@Lundin yes no need. And also void display( int q[][4], int row, int col) is much easier. –  Jayesh Jun 9 '14 at 7:56

Another approach to solve this would be to explicitly pass the array's address and de-reference it (display()) the desired result however can also be achieved without the additional level of indirection (display1()):

#include <stdio.h>

void display(const size_t row, const size_t col, int (*pa)[row][col]);
void display1(const size_t row, const size_t col, int a[row][col]);

int main(void)
{
  int a[3][4] = {
    {  1,  2,  3,  4 },
    {  5,  6,  7,  8 },
    {  9, 10, 11, 12 } 
  };

  display(3, 4, &a);
  display1(3, 4, a);

  return 0;
}

void display(const size_t rows, const size_t cols, const int (*pa)[row][col]);
{
  for (size_t i = 0; i < rows; ++i)
  {
    for (size_t j = 0; j < cols; ++j)
    {
      printf("Arr[%zu][%zu] is %d\n", i, j, (*pa)[i][j]);
    }
  }
}

void display1(const size_t rows, const size_t cols, const int a[row][col]);
{
  for (size_t i = 0; i < rows; ++i)
  {
    for (size_t j = 0; j < cols; ++j)
    {
      printf("Arr[%zu][%zu] is %d\n", i, j, a[i][j]);
    }
  }
}

Update: This needs at least a C99 compatible compiler.

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1  
Just one indirection too much, to my taste. –  Jens Gustedt Jun 9 '14 at 7:18
    
Seem's like a much cleaner way, ty! –  NirAv JaIn Jun 9 '14 at 7:34

In modern C you should pass the sizes of the dimensions first

void display(size_t row, size_t col, int (*q)[col]);

and you then can use q just as normal as q[i][j] with all index computations done for you.

void display(size_t row, size_t col, int (*q)[col]) {
    for(size_t i=0; i<row; i++) {
            for(size_t j=0; j<col; j++)
                printf("Arr[%zu][%zu] is %d\n", i, j, q[i][j]);
        }
}

This needs at leas C99 to work.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes I am familiar with that way of accessing elements (q[i][j]), however I wish to learn to do so using pointers. Thank you for pointing out how to pass 2d array as (*q)[col] :) –  NirAv JaIn Jun 9 '14 at 7:28
    
But the only thing here that's C99-dependent is the variable declarations inside the loop? Which is unrelated to the problem: the array pointer syntax should work on any version of C. The col array size of the array pointer seems to be ignored at least by gcc -std=c89. –  Lundin Jun 9 '14 at 7:35
    
Nevermind, -pedantic-errors made gcc behave as it should. Funny that gcc -std=c89 allows you to use VLA:s. –  Lundin Jun 9 '14 at 7:50

Your only problem was with the way you were calling display. You needed to drop the indexes when passing the array and fix the initial definition for display to match:

#include <stdio.h>

void display(int q[][4], int, int);

int main()
{
    int a[3][4] = {
                            {1,2,3,4},
                            {5,6,7,8},
                            {9,10,11,12}
                            };

    display (a, 3, 4);

    return 0;
}
void display(int q[][4], int row, int col)
{
    int i,j;

    for(i=0; i<row; i++)
        {
            for(j=0; j<col; j++)
                printf("Arr[%d][%d] is %d\n",i,j,*(*(q+i)+j));
        }
}

Output:

Arr[0][0] is 1
Arr[0][1] is 2
Arr[0][2] is 3
Arr[0][3] is 4
Arr[1][0] is 5
Arr[1][1] is 6
Arr[1][2] is 7
Arr[1][3] is 8
Arr[2][0] is 9
Arr[2][1] is 10
Arr[2][2] is 11
Arr[2][3] is 12
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