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I am working with a C89 compiler and I'm coming across some pointer typing error.

Calling code:

struct cpu_state_type cpu_state;
//Stuff here....
foo()
{
    print_out_cpu(&cpu_state);
}

Print_out_cpu is defined elsewhere and the H file is #included in.

struct cpu_state_type
{
  int r[12];
};
void print_out_cpu(struct cpu_state_type *c);

I get error:

error: incompatible type for argument 1 of 'print_out_cpu'

As best as I can understand,&cpu_state returns type cpu_state_type*, so I am confused.

share|improve this question
    
Can you try to cast to (cpu_state_type*) and see if it works/crashes? –  pajton Mar 9 '10 at 18:47
    
Where is struct cpu_state_type defined? –  Bertrand Marron Mar 9 '10 at 18:49
1  
"adding a cast and see if it works" should never be the answer to a problem. –  nos Mar 9 '10 at 18:56
2  
@Paul: you are saying that with explicit cast to struct cpu_state_type* there's no match for the print_out_cpu function - that makes me think you have conflicting declaration of that function somewhere. –  Nikolai N Fetissov Mar 9 '10 at 19:10
1  
@nos I was trying to get more information about the problem. If I meant it to be a solution I'd post this as answer. –  pajton Mar 9 '10 at 20:29

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Are you sure the prototype has the * in it? If I compile (gcc -std=c89) the following code, I get that exact error:

  struct cpu_state_type {
     int r[12];
  };

  // note that it is the structure as the param here (not the pointer)
  void print_out_cpu(struct cpu_state_type c);
  struct cpu_state_type cpu_state;

  foo()
  {
     print_out_cpu(&cpu_state);
  }
share|improve this answer

I don't see any problems, so I wonder if it's an error in your include statement or in the file, etc.

It'll be difficult to determine the cause of the error without seeing more of the source. Try creating a source file like:

#include struct cpu_state_type cpu_state;

void foo() {
print_out_cpu(&cpu_state); }

If that doesn't trigger the problem, keep adding things until it does. If it does trigger the problem, extract the pertinent parts of the header file into your source (and remove the #include) and try again.

share|improve this answer
4  
#include struct cpu_state_type cpu_state; ? –  Bertrand Marron Mar 9 '10 at 18:57

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