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Thank you! fread(&byte[i], sizeof(BYTE), 1, inptr) solve the problem.

Part of the code:

BYTE (byte[block_size]);
for (int i = 0; i < block_size; i++)
    {
        fread(&byte, sizeof(BYTE), 1, inptr);
        byte[i] = *byte;
        printf("b[%i] = %i\t", i, byte[i]);
    }
    printf("b0 = %i, b1 = %i, b2 = %i, b3 = %i\n", byte[0], byte[1], byte[2], byte[3]);
    return 0;

Inside "for loop" byte's values are printed correctly. byte[0] has value 104. Outside of the loop value for byte[0] is 0. Why it is not 104? Values for bytes 1, 2 and 3 are correct outside of loop.

share|improve this question
    
If BYTE is a type, then what is this BYTE (byte[block_size]); !? –  StoryTeller Jun 9 '14 at 10:27
    
Sorry I was too fast. fread(&byte, sizeof(BYTE), block_size, inptr) solved it. BYTE (byte[block_size]) was written by mistake. Correct is without (). –  user3706178 Jun 9 '14 at 18:48
    
Sorry I was too fast. fread(&byte, sizeof(BYTE), block_size, inptr) solved it. BYTE (byte[block_size]) was written by mistake. Correct is without (). –  user3706178 Jun 9 '14 at 18:50
    
Actually, the main bug is this line: (remember it is in a loop reading one byte at a time.) fread(&byte, sizeof(BYTE), 1, inptr); This line should be: fread(&byte[i], sizeof(BYTE), 1, inptr); –  user3629249 Jun 10 '14 at 8:11
    
BTW: using defined names, where your code is only changing the capitalization is a VERY bad practice. Something like BYTE myArray[block_size] would be much better. And having all #define'd values be all caps would be better yet, for readability –  user3629249 Jun 10 '14 at 8:11

1 Answer 1

When you read in your byte array, you use the first value byte[0] or *byte as scratch space. There are several ways to fix this:

Temporary variable - Instead of using *byte, create a temporary variable:

for (int i = 0; i < block_size; i++) {
    BYTE tmp;

    fread(&tmp, sizeof(BYTE), 1, inptr);
    byte[i] = tmp;
}

Direct access - You don't really need the temporary variable if you are just copying it later, so you can address the byte you want to write to directly:

for (int i = 0; i < block_size; i++) {
    fread(&byte[i], sizeof(BYTE), 1, inptr);
}

Read blocks - In fact, you don't even need the loop, because fread already reads a certain number of blocks:

fread(byte, sizeof(BYTE), block_size, inptr);

Your code looks a bit as if it mixed up the first two and the third method.

Finally, a note: BYTE is not a standard type, so please include the typedef so we know what you are talking about. I was thrown off track by your declaration

BYTE (byte[block_size]);

The parentheses look weird, although they seem to be correct syntax. Get rid of them and that line looks like an array declaration, which it is, of course:

BYTE byte[block_size];
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! fread(&byte[i], sizeof(BYTE), 1, inptr) solve the problem. –  user3706178 Jun 9 '14 at 18:33
1  
@user3706178 if answer was helpful and it solved your problem, mark it as accepted. –  macfij Jun 9 '14 at 18:40

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