Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've been trying to write a simple Static-class State Machine for my application to notify other controls and code when the system state changes. And I think I almost have it, but I'm running into a small issue that I'm not sure how to work around.

Here's the code:

// An enum denoting the 3 States
public enum Status { Error = -1, Working, Ready }

// The main state change class
public static class Sys
{
    // system status
    private static Status state;

    // delegate and event
    public static delegate void StateChangeHandler(object sys, SysInfoEventArgs sysStateInfo);
    public static event StateChangeHandler OnStateChange;

    public static Status State
    {
        get { return state; }
        set
        {
            SysInfoEventArgs sysInfo = new SysInfoEventArgs(state, value);
            state = value;
            OnStateChange(this, sysInfo);
        }
    }
}

/// <summary>Contains previous and current state info</summary>
public class SysInfoEventArgs : EventArgs
{
    public readonly Status oldState;
    public readonly Status newState;
    public SysInfoEventArgs(Status oldState, Status newState)
    {
        this.oldState = oldState;
        this.newState = newState;
    }
}

The problem I am having is with this line:

 OnStateChange(this, sysInfo);

Specifically, the word "this" is illegal. And I understand why: "this" is supposed to refer back to the self of an instantiated object (not a static class).

I would prefer to have a Static class for my state machine rather than one that I can instantiate multiple copies of. (Not that it would be such a bad thing, but I feel it makes the code cleaner having a static class.)

So how am I supposed to work this?

Update:

As a follow-up, I selected Jon Skeet's answer as the correct one because the issue was more about the approach I was taking, rather than a technical failure that I was having. Although, pretty much all of the other answers below fix the technical glitch I was dealing with.

Oddly enough, as I was reviewing with my co-worker the application that I wrote, she pointed out that the program should probably track both the state of the server connection as well as the state of the work being done. (Yes, Virginia, this means I need 2 state machines... Ergo, remove all the "static" keywords from the code above and make it a regular class was the smart approach.)

Thanks again, everyone!

share|improve this question
    
+1 Good question, and great answers. I'm curious: in your model what exactly subscribes to the OnChanged Event : how are "controls notified" ? I've been using a complex technique involving storing method bodies bound to delegates (as values in a Dictionary where the keys are the Controls that need to be notified) that are then executed by DynamicInvoke for notification: if you have a simpler way, I am all ears, thanks, –  BillW Mar 9 '10 at 22:35
    
Well, I'm still only familiar with C#/.Net 2.0, so in the case of my (small) application, I created two methods. One to change the state of various buttons, and another to change the state of a visual indicator. Although I guess I could have put it all in one method. --- All of that said, I have been reading about .NET 3.x and WPF lately. From what I can tell, this would be a perfect case for use of "Routed Events" -- Specifically, "Event Tunnelling", where the event tunnels down the chain of controls and each control has its chance to reply/handle the event. (In this case, change its state.) –  Pretzel Mar 10 '10 at 13:26
    
I have "hovered on the brink" of WPF for some time now: clearly superior technology in WPF for binding properties, "synchronizing" controls, event handling, etc. If you stick with WinForms you may be interested in a working code sample I posted in this SO question: stackoverflow.com/questions/2391828/… which demonstrates using DataBinding to simultaneously update multiple controls. Whether that could be useful in the context of your "state machine" ... I'm not sure. –  BillW Mar 11 '10 at 8:50
add comment

5 Answers

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Why would you want a static class? It's a state machine - it has state - that naturally suggests using a non-static class. You can always have a static variable referring to a single instance of it if you really want to.

Basically, your instinct is incorrect in my view - having a normal class would make the code cleaner than a static one. Static classes should very rarely have any state at all - perhaps a cache (although even that's dubious), or counters for diagnostic purposes etc. Try to think in terms of objects rather than classes. Does it make sense to have two separate state machines, with a different current state and perhaps different event handlers? It's easy to imagine that's the case - and it means it's easy to create new instances for tests etc. (It also allows independent tests to run in parallel.) Having the state in an instance of the machine is therefore a natural fit.

There are some people who believe there should be no static methods, no static classes etc. I think that's taking it a bit far, but you should always at least consider the testability impact of introducing statics.

share|improve this answer
1  
This is a very valid point. I have a feeling, over time, a static class is going to problematic. –  Reed Copsey Mar 9 '10 at 19:18
    
+1 best answer so far. –  JonH Mar 9 '10 at 19:19
    
+1 Good point for design and testability. –  Ron Klein Mar 9 '10 at 19:22
1  
@JonH: It is on one hand, except that it doesn't actually answer the question in regards of how the OP would handle this properly if they want it to remain static. ;) –  Reed Copsey Mar 9 '10 at 19:23
    
Hey Jon, thanks for questioning my instinct. I wasn't sure I was necessarily taking the right approach here (which is why I specifically brought it up.) You bring up a good point about potentially having a need for multiple state machines as well as testability. I think I'll redesign and forgo the Static class. Thanks! –  Pretzel Mar 9 '10 at 19:36
show 5 more comments

You can't use "this" when you're working within a static scope, such as a static class or a static method.

You have two options here. You can pass null for the "sys" parameter. Really, this parameter, in the case of a static class, is really not useful, since the "sender" is always the static class.

Alternatively, you might want to consider making your state notifier a singleton. This would allow you to have a single instance of a non-static class. This does have the one advantage of making it easier to transition to a non-static implementation if future requirements change, as well.


In addition, you really should check to make sure there are subscribers prior to raising this event. Not doing so could cause problems:

public static Status State
{
    get { return state; }
    set
    {
        SysInfoEventArgs sysInfo = new SysInfoEventArgs(state, value);
        state = value;
        var handler = OnStateChange;
        if (handler != null)
            handler(null, sysInfo);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Good call on the subscriber check prior to raising the event. That's a big "duh". I should know better by now... :) –  Pretzel Mar 9 '10 at 19:37
add comment

Modify your delegate:

from:

public static delegate void StateChangeHandler(object sys, SysInfoEventArgs sysStateInfo);

to:

public static delegate void StateChangeHandler(SysInfoEventArgs sysStateInfo);
share|improve this answer
    
Despite years of programming under my belt, I can't help but recall a passage in a Charles Petzold book about Windows 3.x programming. (I never did learn how to write for Win3.x - ha!) Specifically, he was talking about how much C++ code goes into just creating a window and that at first you'll have to consider these first few hundred lines of code to be "incantations" and that later the reader would understand what is going on. Well, here I am, writing code and not even considering that I can change the passed parameters of my delegate... Thanks for the insight. I'll have to give it a shot. –  Pretzel Mar 9 '10 at 19:43
add comment

I'd change this code:

public static delegate void StateChangeHandler(object sys, SysInfoEventArgs sysStateInfo);
public static event StateChangeHandler OnStateChange;

to:

public static event Action<SysInfoEventArgs> OnStateChange;
share|improve this answer
    
Looks like I'm still stuck in C# 2.0 -- I just ordered Jon Skeet's "C# in Depth: What you need to master C# 2 and 3" a few days ago -- Hopefully it will get here soon... :) -- Thanks for the tip. I'll give it a shot. –  Pretzel Mar 9 '10 at 19:46
add comment

If you really want to keep the static class and use the semantics of object sender, then the proper thing to pass would be typeof(Sys). This is also analogous to the (old and rare) locking idiom on a static class.

But that's just being pedantic, because the event handler will never use that value, and in practice null would work just as well.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Jeffrey. That's insightful, actually. –  Pretzel Mar 9 '10 at 19:39
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.