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Consider these two functions.

function func1() {
   return
   {
      foo: 'bar'
   }
}

function func2() {
   return {
      foo: 'bar'
   }
}

alert(typeof func2()) //return object

alert(typeof func1()) //return undefined

Why does the position of the braces matter when in many other languages it does not? Is it a language feature or a bug?

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marked as duplicate by devnull, TimWolla, ecatmur, FreeAsInBeer, Streppel Jun 9 '14 at 16:53

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1 Answer 1

up vote 44 down vote accepted

Because of automatic semicolon insertion. The first code is the same as

function func1() {
   return;
   {
      foo: 'bar'
   }
}

If you wonder why this code doesn't produce a syntax error, foo: is a label.

Regarding

Is it a language feature or a bug?

It's a feature. But a very dangerous one. The best way to keep it being a feature for you is to stick to consistent formatting style (I'd suggest to use the Google style guide until you're experienced enough to make your own).

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Thanks. Automatic semicolon insertion make sense. –  nnoor Jun 9 '14 at 14:05
    
This would be improved by a link to 12.9 The return Statement that Ejay pointed out. –  Joshua Taylor Jun 9 '14 at 14:46
    
JS doesn't compile. –  Scimonster Jun 9 '14 at 14:53

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