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A timer is being used in my C# application to determine if an expected event has occured in a timely fassion. This is how I am currently attempting to do this:

// At some point in the application where the triggering event has just occured.
   // Now, the expected event should happen within the next second.
   timeout = false;
   timer1.Interval = 1000; // Set timeout for 1 second.
   timer1.Start();

timer1_Tick(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
   timeout = true;
}

// At some point in the application where the expected event has occured.
   timer1.Stop();

// At a later point in the application where the timeout is
// checked, before procedding.
   if ( timeout )
   {
      // Do something.
   }

Now, what I am wondering is when the Start() or Stop() member methods are called, does that cause the timer count to reset? I am using Microsoft Visual C# 2008 Express Edition. Thanks.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

When you call Stop() it effectively resets the timer back to 0, from the linked page:

Calling Start after you have disabled a Timer by calling Stop will cause the Timer to restart the interrupted interval. If your Timer is set for a 5000-millisecond interval, and you call Stop at around 3000 milliseconds, calling Start will cause the Timer to wait 5000 milliseconds before raising the Tick event.

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Thanks. I did look at the MSDN article, but I must have missed this tidbit of information. –  Jim Fell Mar 9 '10 at 20:43

From MSDN:

Calling Start after you have disabled a Timer by calling Stop will cause the Timer to restart the interrupted interval. If your Timer is set for a 5000-millisecond interval, and you call Stop at around 3000 milliseconds, calling Start will cause the Timer to wait 5000 milliseconds before raising the Tick event.

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