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I am currently writing a program which implements a communication between a client and a server.

Since the client has to send several different requests, I have decided to divide my program into several major functions, each in charge of performing a different request.

The first function has successfully connected to the server. However, the functions which follow it get only empty reply messages as a reply from the server.

My question is: is it possible that upon the termination of the first function, the connection to the server is lost?

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <conio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <WinSock2.h>
#include <Windows.h>

int handle_connection(WSADATA* info, struct sockaddr_in* sockaddr);

void communicate(const int SOCKET);

int get_num_lines(const int SOCKET);

int main()
{
 WSADATA info;
 struct sockaddr_in client;
 const int SOCKET = handle_connection(&info, &client);
 communicate(SOCKET);
 .
 .
 .
 closesocket(SOCKET);
 WSACleanup();
 return 0;
}

int handle_connection(WSADATA* info, struct sockaddr_in* socket_info)
{
 if (WSAStartup(MAKEWORD(2, 0), info))
 {
  exit(1);
 }
 int tcp_socket = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_STREAM, IPPROTO_TCP);
 if (tcp_socket == INVALID_SOCKET)
 {
  WSACleanup();
  exit(1);
 }
 socket_info->sin_family = AF_INET;
 socket_info->sin_addr.s_addr = inet_addr("54.209.143.42");
 socket_info->sin_port = htons(6714);
 if (connect(tcp_socket, (const struct sockaddr*)socket_info, sizeof *socket_info) == SOCKET_ERROR)
 {
  closesocket(tcp_socket);
  WSACleanup();
  exit(1);
 }
 if (send(tcp_socket, "100", 4, 0) == SOCKET_ERROR)
 {
  closesocket(tcp_socket);
  WSACleanup();
  exit(1);
 }
 char* reply = (char*)malloc(4);
 if (!reply)
 {
  closesocket(tcp_socket);
  WSACleanup();
 exit(1);
 }
 if (recv(tcp_socket, reply, 4, 0) == SOCKET_ERROR)
 {
  free(reply);
  closesocket(tcp_socket);
  WSACleanup();
  exit(1);
 }
 if (strcmp(reply, "900") == 0)
 {
  free(reply);
  closesocket(tcp_socket);
  WSACleanup();
  exit(1);
 }
 if (strcmp(reply, "101") == 0)
 {
  printf("Successfully connected to server.\n");
 }
 free(reply);
 return tcp_socket;
}

void communicate(const int SOCKET)
{
 const int NUM_LINES = get_num_lines(SOCKET);
 .
 .
 .
}

int get_num_lines(const int SOCKET)
{
 if (send(SOCKET, "400", 4, 0) == SOCKET_ERROR)
 {
  closesocket(SOCKET);
  WSACleanup();
  exit(1);
 }
 char* reply = (char*)malloc(8);
 char* reply_code = (char*)malloc(4);
 if ((!reply) || (!reply_code))
 {
 free(reply);
 free(reply_code);
 closesocket(SOCKET);
 WSACleanup();
 exit(1);
 }
 if (recv(SOCKET, reply, 8, 0) == SOCKET_ERROR) //here, an empty string is recieved from the server
 {
  free(reply);
  free(reply_code);
  closesocket(SOCKET);
  WSACleanup();
  exit(1);
 }
 strncpy(reply_code, reply, 3);
 reply_code[3] = '\0';
 if (strcmp(reply_code, "900") == 0)
 {
  free(reply);
  free(reply_code);
  closesocket(SOCKET);
  WSACleanup();
  exit(1);
 }
 if (strcmp(reply_code, "401") != 0)
 {
  free(reply);
  free(reply_code);
  closesocket(SOCKET);
  WSACleanup();
  exit(1);
 }
 const int NUM_LINES;
 return NUM_LINES;
}

EDIT: I have updated the code following the advice of @Zack. Please ignore the bad style, for it has to be short

share|improve this question

closed as off-topic by Krom Stern, Arion, Mark Rotteveel, Kumar KL, M42 Jun 10 at 9:04

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions seeking debugging help ("why isn't this code working?") must include the desired behavior, a specific problem or error and the shortest code necessary to reproduce it in the question itself. Questions without a clear problem statement are not useful to other readers. See: How to create a Minimal, Complete, and Verifiable example." – Krom Stern, Arion, Mark Rotteveel, Kumar KL, M42
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
Your problem lies somewhere in the code you have not shown us. Please attempt to construct the shortest possible, complete, self-contained pair of programs (client, server) that demonstrates the same problem. You may discover your bug in the process, and if not, we will be much better able to help you. –  Zack Jun 9 at 16:49
    
Thanks for updating, but this is still not a complete program. We need to be able to compile it, run it, and observe the same problem you are observing. And I am morally certain that you can make it shorter still; for instance, in a test program you do not need to call WSACleanup() on every single failure path. (Actually, I suspect you don't need to do it in general - surely Windows does that for you when you exit()...) –  Zack Jun 10 at 16:44
    
Also, this appears to be only the client; given the discussion with @usr, we need to see the server as well. –  Zack Jun 10 at 16:45
    
And one more thing: all those failure cases? They need to be printing whatever the Winsock equivalent of strerror(errno) is. –  Zack Jun 10 at 16:46

1 Answer 1

You are assuming that recv reads a "message". TCP does not know messages. recv reads any amount of bytes between 1 and the number of bytes that have become known to the host your program is running on.

Adapt your program to cope with this.

share|improve this answer
    
I am afraid that this is not the problem. The previous incoming data has been read hust fine. However, when I exited the handle_connection() and called communicate(), I stopped recievig data from the server - only empty string. –  Alextikh Jun 9 at 17:57
    
Because you are not using the return value from recv correctly you don't know how many bytes were received. If it returns 0 the connection was shut down by the other side. Find out what that function returns. –  usr Jun 9 at 17:59
    
The function returns null. I know what the function should return according to the RFC (it is an made-up protocol). It will return either a "900" code to indicate the shut down of the connection by the server, or "401", followed by 4 characters representing a number. –  Alextikh Jun 9 at 18:25
1  
Are you sure you looked at the return value of recv? It returns an integer, not null. I don't care about the contents of the buffer right now. Do you understand what we are doing here and why we need to look at the return value? –  usr Jun 9 at 18:39
    
It returns 0. My question was about the possibility that the connection was shutdown. I just have no idea why. –  Alextikh Jun 9 at 18:48

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