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Have the following code -

    var http = require('http');
    var mysql = require('mysql');

    // Configure our HTTP server to respond with Hello World to all requests.
    var server = http.createServer(function (request, response) {
      response.writeHead(200, {"Content-Type": "text/plain"});
      response.end("Hello World\n");
    });

    // Listen on port 8000, IP defaults to 127.0.0.1
    server.listen(8000);

    // Put a friendly message on the terminal
    console.log("Server running at http://127.0.0.1:8000/");

When I'm trying to run I'm getting the following error -

Error: Cannot find module 'mysql'

Though I have mysql module installed. Here is something weird, I did installed it with npm install mysql but...

npm ls

returns

└── (empty)

Running

"npm prefix"

returns /home/user, while

npm config get prefix

returns

/home/user/.node

Something that makes it even weirder is the fact that that I have the mysql package both in ~/.node/lib/node_modules/mysql and in ~/.npm/mysql/2.3.2/package (Also, .npm contains more packages)

I'd appreciate any help

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2  
Where is the script located? require() will only find packages that are installed relative to the script. And, globally installed packages are not included in that. By design, those are only available to the command line, not to require(). –  Jonathan Lonowski Jun 9 at 19:31
    
try: npm install mysql -g –  maringan Jun 9 at 20:59
    
Did you install mysql via npm with -g (e.g. npm install mysql -g) ? If you do npm install mysql and npm ls in the same directory, you should see it show up in the list. –  mscdex Jun 9 at 22:47
    
Well, turns out that installing mysql with -g cuased the problem. I've installed it again without the -g and it worked –  Yehonatan Jun 10 at 7:50

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