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I am working on a project that involves programming 32 bit ARM micro-controllers. As in many embedded software coding work, setting and clearing bits are essential and quite repetitive task. Masking strategy is useful when working with micros rather than 32 bits to set and clear bits. But when working with 32 bit micro-contollers, it is not really practical to write masks each time we need to set/clear a single bit.

Writing functions to handle this could be a solution; however having a function occupies memory which is not ideal in my case.

Is there any better alternative to handle bit setting/clearing when working with 32 bit micros?

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migrated from embedded.stackexchange.com Jun 9 '14 at 20:54

This question came from our site for developers of embedded hardware and software systems.

3  
I don't see a problem with masking and or-ing to set a filed within a 32-bit value. Can you give an example of what you want? And do you use C, C++, or maybe something else? – Wouter van Ooijen May 22 '14 at 20:35
    
I am using C language and want to handle clearing or settings bits in an efficient and easy way. For example, instead of doing this: WDTCTL = WDTPW + WDTHOLD (this is just a simple example), I want to set the desired bit locations of a register in an easy way, like a function but less memory hungry. – gbudan May 22 '14 at 20:44
    
Your question asked about an alternative to writing masks, but the answer you ticked instead gave a way to hide the & and | operations. Can you clarify your question? – Rocketmagnet May 24 '14 at 11:29
    
By using macros as suggested by @Gilles, the execution speed of the program can be increased. When the actual code snippet is to be used, it can be substituted by the name of the macro. The same block of statements, on the other hand, need to be repeatedly hard coded as and when required. So, it is a good alternative to using masking in the code. – gbudan May 24 '14 at 11:59
    
Not all functions occupy memory. On modern C/C++ compilers, there are many functions whose impact on the binary size and execution times is exactly zero. You can't be sure unless you audit the assembly code. – Kuba Ober May 27 '14 at 16:19
up vote 11 down vote accepted

In C or C++, you would typically define macros for bit masks and combine them as desired.

/* widget.h */
#define WIDGET_FOO 0x00000001u
#define WIDGET_BAR 0x00000002u

/* widget_driver.c */
static uint32_t *widget_control_register = (uint32_t*)0x12346578;

int widget_init (void) {
    *widget_control_register |= WIDGET_FOO;
    if (*widget_control_register & WIDGET_BAR) log(LOG_DEBUG, "widget: bar is set");
}

If you want to define the bit masks from the bit positions rather than as absolute values, define constants based on a shift operation (if your compiler doesn't optimize these constants, it's hopeless).

#define WIDGET_FOO (1u << 0)
#define WIDGET_BAR (1u << 1)

You can define macros to set bits:

/* widget.h */
#define WIDGET_CONTROL_REGISTER_ADDRESS ((uint32_t*)0x12346578)
#define SET_WIDGET_BITS(m) (*WIDGET_CONTROL_REGISTER_ADDRESS |= (m))
#define CLEAR_WIDGET_BITS(m) (*WIDGET_CONTROL_REGISTER_ADDRESS &= ~(uint32_t)(m))

You can define functions rather than macros. This has the advantage of added type verifications during compilations. If you declare the function as static inline (or even just static) in a header, a good compiler will inline the function everywhere, so using a function in your source code won't cost any code memory (assuming that the generated code for the function body is smaller than a function call, which should be the case for a function that merely sets some bits in a register).

/* widget.h */
#define WIDGET_CONTROL_REGISTER_ADDRESS ((uint32_t*)0x12346578)
static inline void set_widget_bits(uint32_t m) {
    *WIDGET_CONTROL_REGISTER_ADDRESS |= m;
}
static inline void set_widget_bits(uint32_t m) {
    *WIDGET_CONTROL_REGISTER_ADDRESS &= ~m;
}
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+1 Yes. Macros seem like a better alternative to take care of this at compile time. – gbudan May 23 '14 at 13:50
    
I don't see how this answers the question. What in your code has removed the need for the programmer to write masks? The arguments to your macros and functions are still masks. The only thing you have done is to hide the | and & operations. – Rocketmagnet May 23 '14 at 19:35
1  
@Rocketmagnet I'm not sure what exactly the question was fishing for. I admit that it can be interpreted as “alternative to writing | and & operations”, in which case there is no alternative. They have to be written somewhere, but they can be buried in a library so that you don't have to think about how the masking is done when you use them. If the question was looking for writing 1 << 7 rather than 128, then it's usually better to do it when defining the constant, so as not to bake in the fact that the mask is a single bit; I've added an example for that. – Gilles May 23 '14 at 20:04
    
I feel I should down vote because the answer doesn't match the question. – Rocketmagnet May 25 '14 at 9:01

The other common idiom for registers providing access to individual bits or groups of bits is to define a struct containing bitfields for each register of your device. This can get tricky, and it is dependent on the C compiler implementation. But it can also be clearer than macros.

A simple device with a one-byte data register, a control register, and a status register could look like this:

typedef struct {
    unsigned char data;
    unsigned char txrdy:1;
    unsigned char rxrdy:1;
    unsigned char reserved:2;
    unsigned char mode:4;
} COMCHANNEL;
#define CHANNEL_A (*(COMCHANNEL *)0x10000100)
// ...
void sendbyte(unsigned char b) {
    while (!CHANNEL_A.txrdy) /*spin*/;
    CHANNEL_A.data = b;
}
unsigned char readbyte(void) {
    while (!CHANNEL_A.rxrdy) /*spin*/;
    return CHANNEL_A.data;
}

Access to the mode field is just CHANNEL_A.mode = 3;, which is a lot clearer than writing something like *CHANNEL_A_MODE = (*CHANNEL_A_MODE &~ CHANNEL_A_MODE_MASK) | (3 << CHANNEL_A_MODE_SHIFT);. Of course, the latter ugly expression would usually be (mostly) covered over by macros.

In my experience, once you established a style for describing your peripheral registers you are best served by following that style over the whole project. The consistency will have huge benefits for future code maintenance, and over the lifetime of a project that factor likely is more important that the relatively small detail of whether you adopted the struct and bitfields or macro style.

If you are coding for a target which has already set a style in its manufacturer provided header files and customary compiler toolchain, adopting that style for your own custom hardware and low level code may be best as it will provide the best match between manufacturer documentation and your coding style.

But if you have the luxury of establishing the style for your development at the outset, your compiler platform is well enough documented to permit you to reliably describe device registers with bitfields, and you expect to use the same compiler for the lifetime of the product, then that is often a good way to go.

You can actually have it both ways too. It isn't that unusual to wrap the bitfield declarations inside a union that describes the physical registers, allowing their values to be easily manipulated all bits at once. (I know I've seen a variation of this where conditional compilation was used to provide two versions of the bitfields, one for each bit order, and a common header file used toolchain-specific definitions to decide which to select.)

typedef struct {
    unsigned char data;
    union {
        struct {
            unsigned char txrdy:1;
            unsigned char rxrdy:1;
            unsigned char reserved:2;
            unsigned char mode:4;
        } bits;
        unsigned char status;
    };
} COMCHANNEL;
// ...
#define CHANNEL_A_MODE_TXRDY 0x01
#define CHANNEL_A_MODE_TXRDY 0x02
#define CHANNEL_A_MODE_MASK  0xf0
#define CHANNEL_A_MODE_SHIFT 4
// ...
#define CHANNEL_A (*(COMCHANNEL *)0x10000100)
// ...
void sendbyte(unsigned char b) {
    while (!CHANNEL_A.bits.txrdy) /*spin*/;
    CHANNEL_A.data = b;
}
unsigned char readbyte(void) {
    while (!CHANNEL_A.bits.rxrdy) /*spin*/;
    return CHANNEL_A.data;
}

Assuming your compiler understands the anonymous union then you can simply refer to CHANNEL_A.status to get the whole byte, or CHANNEL_A.mode to refer to just the mode field.

There are some things to watch for if you go this route. First, you have to have a good understanding of structure packing as defined in your platform. The related issue is the order in which bit fields are allocated across their storage, which can vary. I've assumed that the low order bit is assigned first in my examples here.

There may also be hardware implementation issues to worry about. If a particular register must always be read and written 32 bits at a time, but you have it described as a bunch of small bit fields, the compiler might generate code that violates that rule and accesses only a single byte of the register. There is usually a trick available to prevent this, but it will be highly platform dependent. In this case, using macros with a fixed sized register will be less likely to cause a strange interaction with your hardware device.

These issues are very compiler vendor dependent. Even without changing compiler vendors, #pragma settings, command line options, or more likely optimization level choices can all affect memory layout, padding, and memory access patterns. As a side effect, they will likely lock your project to a single specific compiler toolchain, unless heroic efforts are used to create register definition header files that use conditional compilation to describe the registers differently for different compilers. And even then, you are probably well served to include at least one regression test that verifies your assumptions so that any upgrades to the toolchain (or well-intentioned tweaks to the optimization level) will cause any issues to get caught before they are mysterious bugs in code that "has worked for years".

The good news is that the sorts of deep embedded projects where this technique makes sense are already subject to a number of toolchain lock in forces, and this burden may not be a burden at all. Even if your product development team moves to a new compiler for the next product, it is often critical that firmware for a particular product be maintained with the very same toolchain over its lifetime.

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3  
I'd emphasize the compiler dependency. If you're always working with the same compiler on the same hardware, then the bitfield approach is fine. But if you use different compilers, they might place the bits in different positions (starting from the MSB or from the LSB, or padding to different widths). – Gilles May 23 '14 at 14:21
1  
@Gilles absolutely. The lovely thing about deep embedded work is that tool chain choice is often a once-per-project or once-per-CPU shared over many years of project kind of thing. The situation is completely different for Linux Kernel and driver work where you might be writing device driver code that is shared among several CPU architectures, and compiled with several distinct compilers. – RBerteig May 23 '14 at 19:00
    
You have very well described all the things that can go wrong with bitfields with regards to platform dependence and compiler-specific behavior. I've run into problems with bitfield use in legacy code so many times, my advice to new-comers is to NEVER use them. The naming convenience is simply not worth the future problems. You never know if, 10 years down the road, your seemingly one-off project will be ported to a new platform drive the next guy crazy. – BabaBooey May 24 '14 at 0:01
    
Well, someone has to drive the new guy crazy... ;-) Seriously though, they are not without pitfalls. I think most of the pitfalls can be mitigated with adequate test cases combined with compile time assertions. (You can test structure packing at compile time that way, for instance. It is hard to test bit order however.) – RBerteig May 24 '14 at 0:04

If you use the Cortex M3 you can use bit-banding

Bit-banding maps a complete word of memory onto a single bit in the bit-band region. For example, writing to one of the alias words will set or clear the corresponding bit in the bitband region.

This allows every individual bit in the bit-banding region to be directly accessible from a word-aligned address using a single LDR instruction. It also allows individual bits to be toggled from C without performing a read-modify-write sequence of instructions.

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If you have C++ available, and there's a decent compiler available, then something like QFlags is a good idea. It gives you a type-safe interface to bit flags.

It is likely to produce better code than using bitfields in structures, since the bitfields can only be changed one at a time and will likely translate to at least one load/modify/store per each changed bitfield. With a QFlags-like approach, you can get one load/modify/store per each or-assign or and-assign statement. Note that the use of QFlags doesn't require the inclusion of the entire Qt framework. It's a stand-alone header file (after minor tweaks).

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At the driver level setting and clearing bits with masks is very common and sometimes the only way. Besides, it's an extremely quick operation; only a few instructions. It may be worthwhile to set up a function that can clear or set certain bits for readability and also reusability.

It's not clear what type of registers you are setting and clearing bits in but in general there are two cases you have to worry about in embedded systems:

Setting and clearing bits in a read/write register If you want to change a single bit (or a handful of bits) in a read and write register you will first have to read the register, set or clear the appropriate bit using masks and whatever else to get the correct behavior, and then write back to the same register. That way you don't change the other bits.

Writing to separate Set and Clear registers (common in ARM micros) Sometimes there are separate Set and Clear registers. You can write just a single bit to a clear register and it will clear that bit. For instance, if there is a register you want to clear bit 9, just write (1<<9) to the clear register. You don't have to worry about modifying the other bits. Similar for the set register.

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"only a few instructions". In fact, on AVR with GCC the compiler will optimize a single-bit mask into the single assembly instruction sbi for set bit or cbi for clear bit. – BenjiWiebe May 25 '14 at 4:04

You can set and clear bits with a function that takes up as much memory as doing it with a mask:

#define SET_BIT(variableName, bitNumber)    variableName |= (0x00000001<<(bitNumber));
#define CLR_BIT(variableName, bitNumber)    variableName &= ~(0x00000001<<(bitNumber));

int myVariable = 12;

SET_BIT(myVariable, 0);    // myVariable now equals 13
CLR_BIT(myVariable, 1);    // myVariable now equals 11

These macros will produce exactly the same assembler instructions as a mask.

Alternatively, you could do this:

#define BIT(n)        (0x00000001<<n)
#define NOT_BIT(n)   ~(0x00000001<<n)

int myVariable = 12;

myVariable |= BIT(4);        //myVariable now equals 28
myVariable &= NOT_BIT(3);    //myVariable now equals 20

myVariable |= BIT(5) |
              BIT(6) |
              BIT(7) |
              BIT(8);        //myVariable now equals 500
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1  
I don't think your numbers in the comments shake out. 12 decimal is b1100. Setting bit 1 gives b1110, which is 14. Then clearing bit 2 gives b1010, which is 10. – BabaBooey May 24 '14 at 0:10
    
@BabaBooey - Oops. Well spotted. Fixed. – Rocketmagnet May 24 '14 at 8:45

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