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double var1, var2;
std::vector<double *> x;

var1 = 1;
var2 = 2;

x.push_back(&var1);
x.push_back(&var2);

When I debug this code in gdb and try print x[0] or *x[0] I get: Could not find operator[]. Now if I include this line after the push_back:

x[0] = &var1;

I can access any specific elements in gdb. Same thing happens with other members such as front(), at(), etc. My understanding is that the compiler/linker includes only the member functions present in the source code and those are the ones I can use in gdb. Is there a way to include every member function of std::vector so I can access them in gdb?

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Turn off optimizations? –  Qix Jun 9 '14 at 22:44
1  
I'm not sure of a way to prevent the compiler/linker from stripping the [] operator code from the executable, but have a look at this answer for a potential workaround: stackoverflow.com/questions/253099/… –  slugonamission Jun 9 '14 at 22:44
    
@Qix I have only -g -Wall on –  m3phi Jun 9 '14 at 22:51
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Its not "stripped" because its never added. From what I recall (yes, its sketchy; a monday you know), that operator isn't virtual, and if there is no usage, neither will there be expansion of implementation for the given type. You can probably explicitly force it however, though I admittedly have never tried. –  WhozCraig Jun 9 '14 at 22:51

1 Answer 1

up vote 11 down vote accepted

My understanding is that the compiler/linker includes only the member functions present in the source code and those are the ones I can use in gdb.

Your understanding is incorrect / incomplete.

std::vector is a template class. Without explicit instantiation, the compiler is required to instantiate only the methods called (usually a subset of methods present in the source).

Is there a way to include every member function of std::vector so I can access them in gdb?

For a given type T, you should be able to explicitly instantiate entire vector for that T, by requesting it, e.g.:

template class std::vector<double>;
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+1 and I had no idea explicit instantiation fully instantiated the works. Never really thought about it till you mentioned it. Now that I think about it more, it makes total sense. Thanks for teaching me something today!. –  WhozCraig Jun 10 '14 at 3:28
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Why the explicit instantiation must be put outside of the main function? –  duleshi Jun 12 '14 at 6:26
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@duleshi the explicit instantiation process generates a recognizable class, which is comparable to defining a class. If you can't define a class in main, I don't see why you should be allowed to do explicit instantiation in main. –  h9uest Mar 31 at 9:04

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