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My code performs a linear regression on 2 sets of data. It works fine but i do not know how i can print the equation of the line onto the graph itself with scipy or numpy.

Here is my code:

y=np.array([15,1489,859,336,277,265,229,285,391,372,5,345])
x=np.array([196.16,17762.47,28542.19,30170.5,9384.06,43210.29,21819.2,16978.2,45767.54,12328.78,113.71,19257.6])

print x
print y

slope, intercept, r_value, p_value, slope_std_error = stats.linregress(x, y)
print "slope = "+ str(slope)
print "r_value = "+ str(r_value)
print "r_squared = " + str(r_value**2)
print "p_value = "+str(p_value)
# Calculate some additional outputs
predict_y = intercept + slope * x
print predict_y
pred_error = y - predict_y
degrees_of_freedom = len(x) - 2
residual_std_error = np.sqrt(np.sum(pred_error**2) / degrees_of_freedom)


# Plotting
pylab.xlabel('cost')
pylab.ylabel('signups')
pylab.plot(x, y, 'o')
pylab.plot(x, predict_y, 'k-')
pylab.show()
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Where do you want the equation to go? To put it on the title, for example: plt.title('$y=%3.7sx+%3.7s$'%(slope, intercept)). To put it inside the plot use plot.text.

enter image description here

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what does the $y or %3.7s mean? –  jenn Jun 10 at 5:58
    
@jenn, $ tells matplotlib to draw a mathtext. matplotlib.org/users/mathtext.html. % is a method of string formatting, see docs.python.org/2/library/stdtypes.html, section 5.6.2. –  CT Zhu Jun 10 at 6:29

There are lots of ways to do this, depending on the look you want. You could have the line's equation: in a box on the side; floating in the middle of the plot; with an arrow pointing to the line (see below); written along the line; as a title; as a caption (ie, in the text that usually occurs below the plot -- this would be the most common approach); or as a boxed legend in the plot (eg, with different colored lines titled with different colors).

My favorite, given no other constraints is an arrow to the line, because then the reader has no doubt what the equation is actually referring to. To do this, use annotate:

x0 = 20000
y0 = slope*x0+intercept
pylab.annotate(line_eqn, xy=(x0, y0), xytext=(x0-.4*x0, y0+.4*y0),
             arrowprops=dict(arrowstyle='->', connectionstyle='arc3,rad=-0.5'))

enter image description here

For clarity, it may seem that writing along the line would be even more clear, but this will get difficult to read for vertical lines or crossing lines, and there's less positioning flexibility. Personally, I wouldn't recommend the title, since readers expect to see the actual title or topic of the plot in this location, but it's probably the easiest to do since it requires no other parameters for its location.

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