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int a = 10, b = 12, c = 8

!((a < 5) || (c < (a + b)))

I just tried it in a compiler and it was false.

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closed as off-topic by Shafik Yaghmour, rhashimoto, Yu Hao, Ryan Haining, karthik Jun 10 '14 at 5:12

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question was caused by a problem that can no longer be reproduced or a simple typographical error. While similar questions may be on-topic here, this one was resolved in a manner unlikely to help future readers. This can often be avoided by identifying and closely inspecting the shortest program necessary to reproduce the problem before posting." – rhashimoto, Yu Hao, Ryan Haining, karthik
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
Break it down step by step and tell us what you think each step should result in. – chris Jun 10 '14 at 2:46
    
Wooops! I got confused by parenthesis. Nevermind! – user3724404 Jun 10 '14 at 2:48
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The inner expression:

(a < 5) || (c < (a + b))

evaluates a < 5 as false (since a is 10) and c < (a + b) as true (since 8 is less than 10+12). Performing a Boolean "or" operation on false and true gives you true.

And, given that the next thing you do to that value is the ! (inversion), that true turns into a false.

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c < (a + b) == 8 < (10 + 12) == 8 < 22 == true
a < 5 == 10 < 5 == false
(a < 5) || (c < (a + b)) == false || true == true
!((a < 5) || (c < (a + b))) == !(true) == false
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