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I am pretty sure this is not doable, but I will go ahead and cross my fingers and ask.

I am trying to add a method to a built in class. I want this method to be callable by all of the built in class's subclasses. Specifically:

I have a JButton, a JTextPane, and other JComponents. I want to be able to pass in a JDom Element instead of a Rectangle to setBounds(). My current solution is to extend each JComponent subclass with the desired methods, but that is a LOT of duplicate code. Is there a way I can write the following method just one time, and have it callable on all JComponent objects? Or is it required that I extend each subclass individually, and copy and paste the method below?

public void setBounds(Element element) {
    this.setBounds(Integer.parseInt(element.getAttribute(
            "x").toString()), Integer.parseInt(element
            .getAttribute("y").toString()), Integer
            .parseInt(element.getAttribute("width").toString()),
            Integer.parseInt(element.getAttribute("height")
                    .toString()));
}
share|improve this question
    
with inheritance you won't have to write too much duplicate code – Jigar Joshi Jun 10 '14 at 3:15
    
@Jigar Joshi the only way i know of is to write duplicate code for every single subclass of JComponent I use. unless i am missing something? – Evorlor Jun 10 '14 at 3:17
    
It's definitely possible, but I would highly recommend not doing it, as there is almost always is a way you can redesign your code to avoid that need. Is there some reason you can't parse the Element to a Rectangle and just use that? – awksp Jun 10 '14 at 3:17
3  
I would suggest this seems like a good static utility method. Maybe public static JComponent setBounds(JComponent comp, Element element)) and then import static and finally call setBounds(this, element); – Elliott Frisch Jun 10 '14 at 3:20

I don't think you need to. You can just create a static method somewhere as follows:

public static void setBounds(JComponent component, Element element) {
    // parse your JDOM and calculate x, y, width and height

    component.setBounds(x, y, width, height);
}

And then, you just call that method on the components where you need to do this.

share|improve this answer
1  
Or how about component.setBounds(rectangleFromElement(element)). – som-snytt Jun 10 '14 at 3:34
    
@fabian Thanks for the edit. – Robby Cornelissen Jun 10 '14 at 5:02

I would suggest the following way of doing it. Write a wrapper for the Element class(called ComponentElement) as follows.

class ComponentElement{
   private Element e;
   public ComponentElement(Element e)
   {
      this.e = e;
   }
   public int getX()
   {
      return Integer.parseInt(e.getAttribute("x").toString());
   }
   //similar methods like getY(),getWidth(),getHeight() etc..
}

Then wherever you want to set the bounds of a component,

ComponentElement e = new ElementWrapper(element)
component.setBounds(e.getX(),e.getY(),e.getWdith(),e.getHeight());

This removes most of the boiler-plate code that you will have to repeat(getAttribute/Integer.parseInt etc..).

It doesn't involve static methods. The methods are there where they belong. (The getX method belongs in the ComponentElement class. If you went for a static method, where would you put it? Some "Util" class? How would you name it? What other methods would belong in the same class?)

Edit: Or better yet,

class ComponentElement{
   private Element e;
   public ComponentElement(Element e)
   {
      this.e = e;
   }


   Public Rectangle getRectangle()
   {
      return //a rectangle based on the attributes
   }
}

and

component.setBounds(new ComponentElement(element).getRectangle());
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