Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

In Objective C, one could do the following to check for strings:

if ([myString isEqualToString:@""]) {
    NSLog(@"myString IS empty!");
} else {
    NSLog(@"myString IS NOT empty, it is: %@", myString);
}

How does one detect empty strings in swift?

share|improve this question
up vote 89 down vote accepted

There is now the built in ability to detect empty string with .isEmpty:

if emptyString.isEmpty {
    println("Nothing to see here")
}

Apple Pre-release documentation: "Strings and Characters".

share|improve this answer
1  
You can also use isEqualToString, which comes in handy if you're initializing the var with NSString ('var emptyString: NSString'): emptyString.isEqualToString("") – Sven Sep 17 '14 at 19:17

A concise way to check if the string is nil or empty would be:

var myString: String? = nil

if (myString ?? "").isEmpty {
    print("String is nil or empty")
}
share|improve this answer

Here is how I check if string is blank. By 'blank' I mean a string that is either empty or contains only space/newline characters.

struct MyString {
  static func blank(text: String) -> Bool {
    let trimmed = text.stringByTrimmingCharactersInSet(NSCharacterSet.whitespaceAndNewlineCharacterSet())
    return trimmed.isEmpty
  }
}

How to use:

MyString.blank(" ") // true
share|improve this answer
7  
And as a extension... gist.github.com/danielgomezrico/f852114508c1cfaaa849 – danielgomezrico Mar 26 '15 at 22:01
1  
As an addendum, you may want to consider using the whitespaceAndNewlineCharacterSet instead of just whitespace. – fwielstra Aug 20 '15 at 8:45
    
thanks @fwielstra, ignoring new lines will be very useful as well. – Evgenii Aug 20 '15 at 22:54

I am rewriting my answer because there have been better answers written since I first posted. I am including explanations of how they work.

Nonoptional String

Check for zero length.

Method 1

let myString: String = ""

if myString.isEmpty {
    print("String is empty.")
}

Method 2

let myString: String = ""

if myString.characters.count == 0 {
    print("String is empty.")
}

The characters method on String is a Swift 2.0 addition.

Optional String

Check for nil or zero length.

Method 1

(Thanks to @AlbertBori)

var myOptionalString: String? = nil

if (myOptionalString ?? "").isEmpty {
    print("String is nil or empty.")
}

The double question marks (??) is called the nil-coalescing operator. It says: use myString as long as it isn't nil, but if it is nil then use an empty String (""). See this answer for more info about ??.

Method 2

(Thanks to @MadNik)

var myOptionalString: String? = nil

if !(myOptionalString?.characters.count > 0) {
    print("String is nil or empty.")
}

This method makes use of Optional Chaining. As soon as a nil is encountered, the expression stops being evaluated. The part inside the parentheses would return false no matter what the equality operator is. That's why we can't just use == 0 to test for zero length.

Method 3

(My original answer)

var myOptionalString: String? = nil

if myOptionalString == nil || myOptionalString!.isEmpty {
    print("String is nil or empty.")
}

The implicitly unwrapped myOptionalString! will not cause a crash for a nil because myOptionalString == nil would return true first and myOptionalString!.isEmpty would never be evaluated.

share|improve this answer

To do the nil check and length simultaneously Swift 2.0 and iOS 9 onwards you could use

if(yourString?.characters.count > 0){}
share|improve this answer
    
works like a charm, thank you! – Serge Velikanov Dec 14 '15 at 20:33

For optional Strings how about:

if let string = string where !string.isEmpty
{
    print(string)
}
share|improve this answer

What about

if let notEmptyString = optionalString where !notEmptyString.isEmpty {
    // do something with emptyString 
    NSLog("Non-empty string is %@", notEmptyString)
} else {
    // empty or nil string
    NSLog("Empty or nil string")
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.