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Is there any way to make Android emit a sound of arbitrary frequency (meaning, I don't want to have pre-recorded sound files)?

I've looked around and ToneGenerator was the only thing I was able to find that was even close, but it seems to only be capable of outputting the standard DTMF tones.

Any ideas?

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2  
Did you find any real solution? –  Lohoris Apr 24 '10 at 0:12
11  
No, but I ended up not doing the project. –  fiXedd Apr 24 '10 at 0:59

8 Answers 8

up vote 73 down vote accepted

I originally found this example code on a blog, but it had some bugs in it that generated some horrendous sounds. I've fixed the bugs and posted the resulting code here. Seems to work well for me!

public class PlaySound extends Activity {
    // originally from http://marblemice.blogspot.com/2010/04/generate-and-play-tone-in-android.html
    // and modified by Steve Pomeroy <steve@staticfree.info>
    private final int duration = 3; // seconds
    private final int sampleRate = 8000;
    private final int numSamples = duration * sampleRate;
    private final double sample[] = new double[numSamples];
    private final double freqOfTone = 440; // hz

    private final byte generatedSnd[] = new byte[2 * numSamples];

    Handler handler = new Handler();

    @Override
    public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
        setContentView(R.layout.main);
    }

    @Override
    protected void onResume() {
        super.onResume();

        // Use a new tread as this can take a while
        final Thread thread = new Thread(new Runnable() {
            public void run() {
                genTone();
                handler.post(new Runnable() {

                    public void run() {
                        playSound();
                    }
                });
            }
        });
        thread.start();
    }

    void genTone(){
        // fill out the array
        for (int i = 0; i < numSamples; ++i) {
            sample[i] = Math.sin(2 * Math.PI * i / (sampleRate/freqOfTone));
        }

        // convert to 16 bit pcm sound array
        // assumes the sample buffer is normalised.
        int idx = 0;
        for (final double dVal : sample) {
            // scale to maximum amplitude
            final short val = (short) ((dVal * 32767));
            // in 16 bit wav PCM, first byte is the low order byte
            generatedSnd[idx++] = (byte) (val & 0x00ff);
            generatedSnd[idx++] = (byte) ((val & 0xff00) >>> 8);

        }
    }

    void playSound(){
        final AudioTrack audioTrack = new AudioTrack(AudioManager.STREAM_MUSIC,
                sampleRate, AudioFormat.CHANNEL_OUT_MONO,
                AudioFormat.ENCODING_PCM_16BIT, generatedSnd.length,
                AudioTrack.MODE_STATIC);
        audioTrack.write(generatedSnd, 0, generatedSnd.length);
        audioTrack.play();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
that's great, thanks! I'm trying to make the best out of it... –  Lohoris Sep 18 '10 at 20:54
2  
Is this line correct? audioTrack.write(generatedSnd, 0, numSamples); or should it be numSamples * 2 because there are 2 bytes per sample. Also the write method also takes an array of shorts so what is the advantage of creating an intermediary array of bytes? –  Damian Kennedy Mar 9 '11 at 21:11
1  
This is indeed a great example, thanks a lot. However I found another nasty bug (if you extend the code), which is: audioTrack.write(generatedSnd, 0, numSamples) should be audioTrack.write(generatedSnd, 0, 2*numSamples) or better audioTrack.write(generatedSnd, 0, generatedSnd.length); –  AudioDroid Jun 5 '11 at 16:43
3  
Instead of using "numSamples" in the AudioTrack constructor, you should use generatedSnd.length because The fifth parameter is "buffer size in bytes." The example only plays the first half of the tone. –  Torben Aug 31 '12 at 10:53
5  
@Black27 The samples are created in floating points with an amplitude range from 0.0 to 1.0. Multiply by 32767 would convert it into the 16-bit fixed point range. The AudioTrack expects the buffer to be little endian format. Hence the next two line just converts the byte order from big endian into little endian. –  ains Jun 10 '13 at 7:24

Improving on the above code:

Add amplitude ramp up and ramp down to avoid the clicks.

Add code to determine when the tack has finished playing.

        double duration = 1;                // seconds
        double freqOfTone = 1000;           // hz
        int sampleRate = 8000;              // a number

        double dnumSamples = duration * sampleRate;
        dnumSamples = Math.ceil(dnumSamples);
        int numSamples = (int) dnumSamples;
        double sample[] = new double[numSamples];
        byte generatedSnd[] = new byte[2 * numSamples];


        for (int i = 0; i < numSamples; ++i) {      // Fill the sample array
            sample[i] = Math.sin(freqOfTone * 2 * Math.PI * i / (sampleRate));
        }

        // convert to 16 bit pcm sound array
        // assumes the sample buffer is normalized.
        // convert to 16 bit pcm sound array
        // assumes the sample buffer is normalised.
        int idx = 0;
        int i = 0 ;

        int ramp = numSamples / 20 ;                                    // Amplitude ramp as a percent of sample count


        for (i = 0; i< ramp; ++i) {                                     // Ramp amplitude up (to avoid clicks)
            double dVal = sample[i];
                                                                        // Ramp up to maximum
            final short val = (short) ((dVal * 32767 * i/ramp));
                                                                        // in 16 bit wav PCM, first byte is the low order byte
            generatedSnd[idx++] = (byte) (val & 0x00ff);
            generatedSnd[idx++] = (byte) ((val & 0xff00) >>> 8);
        }


        for (i = i; i< numSamples - ramp; ++i) {                        // Max amplitude for most of the samples
            double dVal = sample[i];
                                                                        // scale to maximum amplitude
            final short val = (short) ((dVal * 32767));
                                                                        // in 16 bit wav PCM, first byte is the low order byte
            generatedSnd[idx++] = (byte) (val & 0x00ff);
            generatedSnd[idx++] = (byte) ((val & 0xff00) >>> 8);
        }

        for (i = i; i< numSamples; ++i) {                               // Ramp amplitude down
            double dVal = sample[i];
                                                                        // Ramp down to zero
            final short val = (short) ((dVal * 32767 * (numSamples-i)/ramp ));
                                                                        // in 16 bit wav PCM, first byte is the low order byte
            generatedSnd[idx++] = (byte) (val & 0x00ff);
            generatedSnd[idx++] = (byte) ((val & 0xff00) >>> 8);
        }

        AudioTrack audioTrack = null;                                   // Get audio track
        try {
            audioTrack = new AudioTrack(AudioManager.STREAM_MUSIC,
                    sampleRate, AudioFormat.CHANNEL_CONFIGURATION_MONO,
                    AudioFormat.ENCODING_PCM_16BIT, (int)numSamples*2,
                    AudioTrack.MODE_STATIC);
            audioTrack.write(generatedSnd, 0, generatedSnd.length);     // Load the track
            audioTrack.play();                                          // Play the track
        }
        catch (Exception e){
            RunTimeError("Error: " + e);
            return false;
        }

        int x =0;
        do{                                                     // Montior playback to find when done
             if (audioTrack != null) 
                 x = audioTrack.getPlaybackHeadPosition(); 
             else 
                 x = numSamples;            
        }while (x<numSamples);

        if (audioTrack != null) audioTrack.release();           // Track play done. Release track.
share|improve this answer
    
Can u explain the changes made in this code? –  Coder Dec 3 '12 at 6:42
    
The primary change was the ramp up and down of the amplitude. The original code started and ended with maximum amplitude. This produce clicks at the start and end of the tone. This code ramps the amplitude up from 0 to full amplitude over the first 20% of the samples. It then ramps down from full amplitude to zero over the last 20% of the samples. The tones are smoother and much more pleasant. The other change was to monitor the playing of the tone and not continue until the tone finished playing. –  Xarph Dec 4 '12 at 8:15
    
I cudnt get it to run..I am able to run the first one..but cant really understand how to modify it to what u have done..it would be really helpful as I am looking to get rid of the click sound.. –  Coder Dec 4 '12 at 8:26
    
Hi, How can sound infinitely??? –  ephramd Jul 3 '13 at 7:36
    
+1, but the code in this answer doesn't come close to compiling. I've implemented it correctly here: gist.github.com/SuspendedPhan/7596139 Just replace Steve's genTone() method with mine and you'll get the ramping effect. –  Dylan P Nov 22 '13 at 7:24

If you can figure out how to create a 16-bit PCM stream of your arbitrary frequency, AudioTrack should do the trick.

Or, just have them call you, and you can hum into the phone... :-)

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That's all I had come up with too. On the plus side, it looks like creating a PCM stream for this shouldn't be too hard. –  fiXedd Mar 11 '10 at 2:04
    
Glad to hear it -- I've never manually created an audio stream, so I haven't the foggiest idea how you'd do it. –  CommonsWare Mar 11 '10 at 2:48

Since there is a bug in some older android versions that causes a memory leak when using MODE_STATIC, I modified Xarph's answer above to use MODE_STREAM. Hopefully it will help some.

public void playTone(double freqOfTone, double duration) {
 //double duration = 1000;                // seconds
 //   double freqOfTone = 1000;           // hz
    int sampleRate = 8000;              // a number

    double dnumSamples = duration * sampleRate;
    dnumSamples = Math.ceil(dnumSamples);
    int numSamples = (int) dnumSamples;
    double sample[] = new double[numSamples];
    byte generatedSnd[] = new byte[2 * numSamples];


    for (int i = 0; i < numSamples; ++i) {      // Fill the sample array
        sample[i] = Math.sin(freqOfTone * 2 * Math.PI * i / (sampleRate));
    }

    // convert to 16 bit pcm sound array
    // assumes the sample buffer is normalized.
    // convert to 16 bit pcm sound array
    // assumes the sample buffer is normalised.
    int idx = 0;
    int i = 0 ;

    int ramp = numSamples / 20 ;                                    // Amplitude ramp as a percent of sample count


    for (i = 0; i< ramp; ++i) {                                     // Ramp amplitude up (to avoid clicks)
        double dVal = sample[i];
                                                                    // Ramp up to maximum
        final short val = (short) ((dVal * 32767 * i/ramp));
                                                                    // in 16 bit wav PCM, first byte is the low order byte
        generatedSnd[idx++] = (byte) (val & 0x00ff);
        generatedSnd[idx++] = (byte) ((val & 0xff00) >>> 8);
    }


    for (i = i; i< numSamples - ramp; ++i) {                        // Max amplitude for most of the samples
        double dVal = sample[i];
                                                                    // scale to maximum amplitude
        final short val = (short) ((dVal * 32767));
                                                                    // in 16 bit wav PCM, first byte is the low order byte
        generatedSnd[idx++] = (byte) (val & 0x00ff);
        generatedSnd[idx++] = (byte) ((val & 0xff00) >>> 8);
    }

    for (i = i; i< numSamples; ++i) {                               // Ramp amplitude down
        double dVal = sample[i];
                                                                    // Ramp down to zero
        final short val = (short) ((dVal * 32767 * (numSamples-i)/ramp ));
                                                                    // in 16 bit wav PCM, first byte is the low order byte
        generatedSnd[idx++] = (byte) (val & 0x00ff);
        generatedSnd[idx++] = (byte) ((val & 0xff00) >>> 8);
    }

    AudioTrack audioTrack = null;                                   // Get audio track
    try {
         int bufferSize = AudioTrack.getMinBufferSize(sampleRate, AudioFormat.CHANNEL_OUT_MONO, AudioFormat.ENCODING_PCM_16BIT);
        audioTrack = new AudioTrack(AudioManager.STREAM_MUSIC,
                sampleRate, AudioFormat.CHANNEL_OUT_MONO,
                AudioFormat.ENCODING_PCM_16BIT, bufferSize,
                AudioTrack.MODE_STREAM);
        audioTrack.play();                                          // Play the track
        audioTrack.write(generatedSnd, 0, generatedSnd.length);     // Load the track
    }
    catch (Exception e){
    }
    if (audioTrack != null) audioTrack.release();           // Track play done. Release track.
}
share|improve this answer
    float synth_frequency = 440;
    int minSize = AudioTrack.getMinBufferSize(SAMPLE_RATE,
AudioFormat.CHANNEL_OUT_MONO,
AudioFormat.ENCODING_PCM_16BIT);
AudioTrack audioTrack = new AudioTrack(AudioManager.STREAM_MUSIC,
SAMPLE_RATE,
AudioFormat.CHANNEL_OUT_MONO,
AudioFormat.ENCODING_PCM_16BIT,
minSize,
AudioTrack.MODE_STREAM);
audioTrack.play();
short[] buffer = new short[minSize];
float angle = 0;
while (true) 
{
    if (play)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < buffer.length; i++)
        {
            float angular_frequency =
            (float)(2*Math.PI) * synth_frequency / SAMPLE_RATE;
            buffer[i] = (short)(Short.MAX_VALUE * ((float) Math.sin(angle)));
            angle += angular_frequency;
    }
        audioTrack.write(buffer, 0, buffer.length);
    } 

// You can add arbitrary value in synth_frequency to get change sound for example you can add random variable to get sound

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Here's another blog demoing a simple synth plus some UI

http://audioprograming.wordpress.com/2012/10/18/a-simple-synth-in-android-step-by-step-guide-using-the-java-sdk/

You might also be interested in csound or pdlib (pure data lib) for android.

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Modified Code Based on Singhaks' answer

public class MainActivity extends Activity {
    private final int duration = 30; // seconds
    private final int sampleRate = 8000;
    private final int numSamples = duration * sampleRate;
    private final double sample[] = new double[numSamples];
    private final double freqOfTone = 440; // hz
    private final byte generatedSnd[] = new byte[2 * numSamples];
    Handler handler = new Handler();
    private AudioTrack audioTrack;
    private boolean play = false;
    @Override
    public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
        setContentView(R.layout.activity_main);
        audioTrack = new AudioTrack(AudioManager.STREAM_MUSIC,
                8000, AudioFormat.CHANNEL_OUT_MONO,
                AudioFormat.ENCODING_PCM_16BIT, numSamples,
                AudioTrack.MODE_STREAM);
    }

    @Override
    protected void onResume() {
        super.onResume();

        // Use a new tread as this can take a while
        Thread thread = new Thread(new Runnable() {
            public void run() {

                handler.post(new Runnable() {

                    public void run() {
                        playSound();
                        genTone();
                    }
                });
            }   
        });
        thread.start();
    }

    void genTone(){
        // fill out the array
        while(play){
                for (int i = 0; i < numSamples; ++i) {
                //  float angular_frequency = 
                    sample[i] = Math.sin(2 * Math.PI * i / (sampleRate/freqOfTone));
                }
                int idx = 0;

                // convert to 16 bit pcm sound array
                // assumes the sample buffer is normalised.
                for (double dVal : sample) {
                    short val = (short) (dVal * 32767);
                    generatedSnd[idx++] = (byte) (val & 0x00ff);
                    generatedSnd[idx++] = (byte) ((val & 0xff00) >>> 8);
                }
                audioTrack.write(generatedSnd, 0, numSamples);
            }
        }


    void playSound(){
        play = true;
        audioTrack.play();
    }
}
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There are several programs for this, but they suck. I measured a few:

http://www.endolith.com/wordpress/2009/11/24/android-audio-applications/

So don't do whatever they do. :D

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