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Here is a lisp procedure that simply adds 'a' to the absolute value of 'b':

(define (a-plus-abs-b a b)
  ((if (> b 0) + -) a b))

I think this is beautiful, and I am trying to find the best way of writing this in JavaScript. But my JavaScript code is not beautiful:

var plus = function(a,b) {
    return a + b;
};

var minus = function(a,b) {
    return a - b;
};

var aPlusAbsB = function(a,b) {
    return (b > 0 ? plus : minus)(a,b);
}

The main problem is that I cannot use the + and - symbols as references to the functions they really represent as I can with lisp. Can anyone come up with a more graceful way of doing something like this, or have I hit a language boundary?

Obviously, I can do this:

var aPlusAbsB = function(a,b) {
    return a + Math.abs(b);
}

, but this is more of a thought experiment than a pragmatic question.

Is there any way I can get reference to the core functions in the JavaScript language just as if they were user-defined?

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Have you looked at Functional.js and its quirky-cute syntax for representing simple functions as strings? –  Pointy Mar 9 '10 at 23:40
    
Also I have no idea whether there really are Function instances in any real sense for the built-in arithmetic operators. –  Pointy Mar 9 '10 at 23:41
    
I have seen the Functional library, and it looks cool. I'm just wondering if there is any way to do this using only core JS. And @Pointy I was wondering the same thing. They may not be Function objects, but there is logic there that executes similarly to how a function executes. –  Matthew Taylor Mar 9 '10 at 23:46
    
Well I'm interested in the question, academically, but I've never seen any reference that'd make me think there are Function objects like that somewhere. However, Javascript is endlessly surprising. –  Pointy Mar 9 '10 at 23:51
    
@Pointy: I always thought that most arithmetic operators ran at the CPU level. But that might not be true of JavaScript. –  Andy E Mar 9 '10 at 23:58
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6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It's a very cool idea - would be great for evaluating mathematical expressions but you simply can't set an operator (or the logic behind it) to a variable. Sorry :-)

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I hate to give you a +1 for the OP's sake, but it's true, there's little you can do about it. –  Sasha Chedygov Mar 9 '10 at 23:58
    
@musicfreak: lol thanks ;-) I often thought about this because there have been times when I've had to check the state of a variable to decide whether to + or -, but it would have been so much cooler if I could have just passed the + or - instead - it would have saved a whole if statement! –  Andy E Mar 10 '10 at 0:01
    
Unless proven otherwise by some roving JavaScript maven, this seems like the answer :(. –  Matthew Taylor Mar 10 '10 at 0:05
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It depends on what aspects of the lisp implementation you find particularly beautiful. I'll propose another version of your suggestion that I think ends up a little closer to your lisp definition's syntax by doing some dirty things.

// Give ourselves + and - functions to level the playing field with lisp.
Number.prototype['+'] = function(x)this+x;
Number.prototype['-'] = function(x)this-x;

// Now we can have some fun.
var aPlusAbsB = function(a,b) a [b > 0 ? '+' : '-'] (b);

// Some other notable language barrier differences, but not too dissimilar?
// (define (a-plus-abs-b a b) ((if (> b 0) + -) a b))
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Though not as elegant as the LISP code, you could create a function dynamically that acts like an operator (on numbers), but it's not.

function op(o) {
    return new Function("a", "b", "return a " + o + " b");
}


function aPlusAbsB(a, b) {
    return (b > 0 ? op('+') : op('-'))(a, b);
}

Additionally, we can hide the complexity of generating these inside an if wrapper, but that's the closest I can get :)

function is(expr, op1, op2) {
    return expr ? op(op1) : op(op2);
}

function aPlusAbsB(a, b) {
    return (is(b > 0, '+', '-')(a, b));
}
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I think everyone else got here first, but JS is slightly less purely functional than lisp, operators are not functions or objects, but operators.

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This is slightly more beautiful than your suggestion, though nowhere near as beautiful as your lisp representation of the concept:

var aPlusAbsB = function(a, b) {
    var plus = function(a, b) {
      return a + b;
    };
    var minus = function(a, b) {
      return a - b;
    };
    return (b > 0 ? plus : minus)(a, b);
}

This would be equivalent to the following in scheme:

(define a-plus-abs-b
  (lambda (a b)
    (let ((plus (lambda (a b) (+ a b))) (minus (lambda (a b) (- a b))))
      (cond ((> b 0) (plus a b))
      (else (minus a b))))))
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Yeah, that's not strictly possible, the closest thing you can do is nest addition and subtraction functions inside.

var aPlusAbsB = function(a, b) {
    return (function(a, b) { b > 0 ? a + b : a - b })(a, b);
}

Not exactly the same, but it gets the job done in a sufficiently indirect way.

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