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May I know what is the differences between 2 findstr code below?

First Case:

findstr /m 0632 log_network.txt
if %errorlevel%==0 (
    echo FOUND
) else (
    echo NOT FOUND
)

Second Case:

set entire_line="0632"
echo %entire_line% | findstr /m log_network.txt
if %errorlevel%==0 (
    echo FOUND
) else (
    echo NOT FOUND
)

The first case return "FOUND" and the second case return "NOT FOUND"... Also, i always see people like to use:

echo %something% | findstr /m filename.txt > null

But I don't understand why they write in this way...

log_network.txt Content:

Set_Param_10A "TRUE" "xnetwork.exist.5846"
Set_Param_10A "TRUE" "xnetwork.exist.7425"
Set_Param_10A "TRUE" "xnetwork.exist.1420"
Set_Param_10A "TRUE" "xnetwork.exist.0632"
Set_Param_10A "TRUE" "xnetwork.exist.1112"
Set_Param_10A "TRUE" "xnetwork.exist.8524"
Set_Param_10A "TRUE" "xnetwork.exist.3675"
Set_Param_10A "TRUE" "xnetwork.exist.3344"
Set_Param_10A "TRUE" "xnetwork.exist.1276"
Set_Param_10A "TRUE" "xnetwork.exist.4796"
Set_Param_10A "TRUE" "xnetwork.exist.3349"
Set_Param_10A "TRUE" "xnetwork.exist.0048"

Thanks...

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Humm... I do NOT like to use echo %something% | findstr "search". This is usually done with every line of a file that imply to execute findstr.exe (a 30KB size file) several times (it is s_l_o_w...). This test may usually be achieved with a simple if that is a lot faster! –  Aacini Jun 10 '14 at 14:19

1 Answer 1

First case is searching the string 0632 into the file log_network.txt and if it is found in the file, the name of the file will be echoed to console (/m switch). If found, errorlevel will be 0, if not found, errorlevel will be 1.

Second case is searching the string log_network.txt in the data it receives from stdin, that is, "0632". This is probably an error or a misinterpretation on the way findstr works.

To "mimic" the functionality of the first code, but using the structure of the second, it should be something like

set "entire_line=0632"
echo %entire_line%| findstr /g:/ /m log_network.txt

That is, first remove the quotes from the searched value (in the original code they are included in the value), and then ask findstr to take search strings from stdin (/g:/), check them against the content of the file log_network.txt and output the name of the file if any coincidence is found (/m)

In any case, it is a lot more efficient the first construct. Creating a pipe involves more cpu usage than just leaving findstr directly do the work.

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