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I have an application that uses 2 threads. I want to be able to shut down both threads by waiting for a condition variable exitCondition. I am using python 3.3 which unlike python 2.7 makes threading.Condition.wait() return True when the condition was notified and False for when a timeout occured.

#!/usr/bin/python
import threading
from time import sleep

exitCondition = threading.Condition()

def inputActivity():
    while True:
        exitCondition.acquire()
        exitConditionReached = exitCondition.wait(.1) #<-critical
        print(exitConditionReached)
        exitCondition.release()
        if exitConditionReached: #exitCondition reached -> shutdown
            return
        else: #exitCondition not reached -> do work
            sleep(.1)

inThread = threading.Thread(target = inputActivity)
inThread.start()

sleep(.2) #<-critical

exitCondition.acquire()
exitCondition.notify()
print("exitCondition notified")
exitCondition.release()

inThread.join()

There are 2 lines with a #<-critical comment in line 10 and 21. If the sleeps are "misaligned" (for example .25 and .1) the program will terminate. If the sleeps are "aligned" (for example .2 and .1) the inThread will run indefinitely printing false forever. It looks like a race condition to me, apparently if notify is called at the same time as wait the notification is not recognized. I was under the impression that the exitCondition.acquire() and exitCondition.release() were supposed to prevent that. The question is why the condition variable is not thread safe and what I can do about it. Ideally I want to write wait(0) with the guarantee that no notification will be swallowed.

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

If the call to exitCondition.notify occurs when the worker thread is doing work (i.e., is in the sleep(.1) call (or anywhere else other than the .wait call), then the behaviour you describe sounds like exactly what I'd expect. The wait call returns True only if the notification happened during the wait.

It sounds to me as though this is a use-case for a threading.Event instead of a threading.Condition: replace threading.Condition with threading.Event, replace the notify call with a set call, and remove the acquire and release calls altogether (in both threads).

That is, the code should look like this:

#!/usr/bin/python
import threading
from time import sleep

exitCondition = threading.Event()

def inputActivity():
    while True:
        exitConditionReached = exitCondition.wait(.1) #<-critical
        print(exitConditionReached)
        if exitConditionReached: #exitCondition reached -> shutdown
            return
        else: #exitCondition not reached -> do work
            sleep(.1)

inThread = threading.Thread(target = inputActivity)
inThread.start()

sleep(.2) #<-critical

exitCondition.set()
print("exitCondition set")

inThread.join()

Once you've got that far, you don't need the first .wait: you can replace that with a direct is_set call to see if the exit condition has been set yet:

#!/usr/bin/python
import threading
from time import sleep

exitCondition = threading.Event()

def inputActivity():
    while True:
        if exitCondition.is_set(): #exitCondition reached -> shutdown
            return
        else: #exitCondition not reached -> do work
            sleep(.1)

inThread = threading.Thread(target = inputActivity)
inThread.start()

sleep(.2) #<-critical

exitCondition.set()
print("exitCondition set")

inThread.join()
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