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I can't seem to wrap my mind around the way R requires the data for a stacked barplot although I have search the net and the available resources.

I have the following data

    df<-c("III", "III", "I", "I", "I", "II", "I", "I", "I", "I", "I", 
"II", "I", "I", "I", "I", "I", "I", "I", "II", "I", "III", "II", 
"II", "III", "I", "II", "II", "I", "I", "IV", "I", "III", "I", 
"III", "I", "I", "II", "I", "II", "II", "I", "II", "I", "II", 
"II", "II", "II", "I", "I", "II", "I", "I", "I", "I", "I", "I", 
"II", "II", "III", "I", "III", "I", "I", "I", "I", "II", "I", 
"II", "III", "I", "I", "I", "I", "III", "II", "II", "I", "I", 
"II", "I", "II", "III", "II", "III", "II", "III", "I", "III", 
"III")

I would like to create a single bar stacked barplot with the percentages of I, II, III, IV. I can only get R to do the following

barplot(table(df)*100/90, col=c("white", "gray70", "gray40", "black"), ylim=c(0,100))

Is there any way to make this a single bar stacked barplot? Please baseR solutions only. Thanks

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

Following will work for you but it wont look good

barplot(as.matrix(table(df)*100/90), 
        col=c("white", "gray70", "gray40", "black"), 
        ylim=c(0,100))
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. It works very nice. What does as.matrix do that barplot understands as stacked graph? – ECII Jun 10 '14 at 12:49
1  
It will convert data into 2-dimensions, which will be interpreted by barplot as multiple categories... – vrajs5 Jun 10 '14 at 12:53

Here's a solution using ggplot, which does not require numerical vector/matrix as input for a bar plot.

library(ggplot2)
ggplot(data.frame(df))+geom_bar(aes(x="df",fill=df),position="stack")

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Here is one possibility (inspired by http://r.789695.n4.nabble.com/How-to-add-marker-in-Stacked-bar-plot-td4635946.html):

df<-c("III", "III", "I", "I", "I", "II", "I", "I", "I", "I", "I", 
"II", "I", "I", "I", "I", "I", "I", "I", "II", "I", "III", "II", 
"II", "III", "I", "II", "II", "I", "I", "IV", "I", "III", "I", 
"III", "I", "I", "II", "I", "II", "II", "I", "II", "I", "II", 
"II", "II", "II", "I", "I", "II", "I", "I", "I", "I", "I", "I", 
"II", "II", "III", "I", "III", "I", "I", "I", "I", "II", "I", 
"II", "III", "I", "I", "I", "I", "III", "II", "II", "I", "I", 
"II", "I", "II", "III", "II", "III", "II", "III", "I", "III", 
"III")

freq <- table(df)

df <- data.frame(names=names(freq), freq=as.vector(freq))

barplot(as.matrix(df[,2]), col=cm.colors(length(df[,2])), legend=df[,1], xlim=c(0,6), width=1) 
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