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I'm trying to convert some of my Obj-C class to Swift. And some other Obj-C classes still using enum in that converted class. I searched In the Pre-Release Docs and couldn't find it or maybe I missed it. Is there a way to use Swift enum in Obj-C Class? Or a link to the doc of this issue?

This is how I declared my enum in my old Obj-C code and new Swift code.

my old Obj-C Code:

typedef NS_ENUM(NSInteger, SomeEnum)
{
    SomeEnumA,
    SomeEnumB,
    SomeEnumC
};

@interface SomeClass : NSObject

...

@end

my new Swift Code:

enum SomeEnum: NSInteger
{
    case A
    case B
    case C
};

class SomeClass: NSObject
{
    ...
}

Update: From the answers. It can't be done in Swift older version than 1.2. But according to this official Swift Blog. In Swift 1.2 that released along with XCode 6.3, You can use Swift Enum in Objective-C by adding @objc in front of enum

share|improve this question
    
There isn't really any need to change your existing code. For interaction between Swift and Objective-C, watch the WWDC videos. – gnasher729 Jun 10 '14 at 11:06
    
I just want to check if my project still work if there will be a swift class in my project in the future but I can't figure out what class should I add to test it. So, I convert the old one instead. Anyway, thanks for your help. – myLifeasdog Jun 10 '14 at 11:34
up vote 89 down vote accepted

As of Swift version 1.2 (Xcode 6.3) you can. Simply prefix the enum declaration with @objc

@objc enum Bear: Int {
    case Black, Grizzly, Polar
}

Shamelessly taken from the Swift Blog


In Objective-C this would look like

Bear type = BearBlack;
switch (type) {
    case BearBlack:
    case BearGrizzly:
    case BearPolar:
       [self runLikeHell];
}
share|improve this answer
2  
thanks a lot for pointing it out... note that in objective-c though the enum values will be call BearBlack, BearGrizzly and BearPolar! – nburk Apr 23 '15 at 19:53
1  
That makes sense no? Especially when you look at how it's translated from obj-c into swift.. @nburk – Daniel Galasko Apr 23 '15 at 20:32
1  
Yes, this works. However, at least in my case a "public" attribute had to be added to the enumeration for it to be accessible on the Objective-C side of the project, like this: "@objc public enum Bear: Int" – Pirkka Esko Jun 30 '15 at 6:33
    
Too bad I don't see any evidence that Swift enum associated values are possible. wishful thinking – finneycanhelp Jul 3 '15 at 20:26
1  
@AJit why would you want to do that? Just add the enum to its own header and import that in the bridging header otherwise it's exclusive to Swift – Daniel Galasko Dec 9 '15 at 18:31

From the Using Swift with Cocoa and Objective-C guide:

A Swift class or protocol must be marked with the @objc attribute to be accessible and usable in Objective-C. [...]

You’ll have access to anything within a class or protocol that’s marked with the @objc attribute as long as it’s compatible with Objective-C. This excludes Swift-only features such as those listed here:

Generics Tuples / Enumerations defined in Swift / Structures defined in Swift / Top-level functions defined in Swift / Global variables defined in Swift / Typealiases defined in Swift / Swift-style variadics / Nested types / Curried functions

So, no, you can't use a Swift enum in an Objective-C class.

share|improve this answer
1  
Is there a workaround? I mean if i create a Swift class and I absolutely need an enum. How can I make that enum be usable into Objective-C as well? – Raul Lopez Villalpando Oct 9 '14 at 16:51
4  
@RaulLopezVillalpando If you know you're going to be interoperating with Objective-C, then you should declare the enumeration in Objective-C and let both languages share it. – Gregory Higley Nov 8 '14 at 0:16
1  
"Yeah so we made this bridge to help you transition to Swift, but it's useless if you wanna use anything cool, like Enums, Structs, Generics... So there's that..." – Kevin R Mar 23 '15 at 22:20
6  
THIS ANSWER IS NO LONGER VALID!! since Xcode 6.3 / Swift 1.2, Swift enums can also be used within objective-c using @objc as @DanielGalasko pointed out in his answer below!!! – nburk Apr 23 '15 at 19:52
2  
Just to clarify the above comment, quoting the current text on the documentation as of Swift 2.1, "Enumerations defined in Swift without Int raw value type". So, if your enum in Swift is declared with an Int raw value type as in @obj enum MyEnum: Int it will work fine on Objective-C files as mentioned before. If your enum is declared with another raw value type like @obj enum MyOtherEnum: String, you will not be able to use it on Objective-C files – jjramos Mar 17 at 21:02

To expand on the selected answer...

It is possible to share Swift style enums between Swift and Objective-C using NS_ENUM().

They just need to be defined in an Objective-C context using NS_ENUM() and they are made available using Swift dot notation.

From the Using Swift with Cocoa and Objective-C

Swift imports as a Swift enumeration any C-style enumeration marked with the NS_ENUM macro. This means that the prefixes to enumeration value names are truncated when they are imported into Swift, whether they’re defined in system frameworks or in custom code.

Objective-C

typedef NS_ENUM(NSInteger, UITableViewCellStyle) {
   UITableViewCellStyleDefault,
   UITableViewCellStyleValue1,
   UITableViewCellStyleValue2,
   UITableViewCellStyleSubtitle
};

Swift

let cellStyle: UITableViewCellStyle = .Default
share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks! Great answer. – Eli_Rozen Nov 18 '14 at 9:34
    
I get at the UITableViewCellStyle "function definition is not allowed here", what am i doing wrong? Of course i have different namings not UITableViewCellStyle. – Cristi Băluță Nov 25 '14 at 15:16
1  
As noted in Mr. Galasko's answer below, Swift 1.2 allows enums to be defined in Swift and available in Obj-c. This style of definition, namely NS_ENUM, still works in Obj-c, but as of Swift version 1.2 you have can use either option. – SirNod Mar 12 '15 at 20:17

If you prefer to keep ObjC codes as-they-are, you could add a helper header file in your project:

Swift2Objc_Helper.h

in the header file add this enum type:

typedef NS_ENUM(NSInteger, SomeEnum4ObjC)
{
   SomeEnumA,
   SomeEnumB
};

There may be another place in your .m file to make a change: to include the hidden header file:

#import "[YourProjectName]-Swift.h"

replace [YourProjectName] with your project name. This header file expose all Swift defined @objc classes, enums to ObjC.

You may get a warning message about implicit conversion from enumeration type... It is OK.

By the way, you could use this header helper file to keep some ObjC codes such as #define constants.

share|improve this answer

If you (like me) really want to make use of String enums, you could make a specialized interface for objective-c. For example:

enum Icon: String {
    case HelpIcon
    case StarIcon
    ...
}

// Make use of string enum when available:
public func addIcon(icon: Icon) {
    ...
}

// Fall back on strings when string enum not available (objective-c):
public func addIcon(iconName:String) {
    addIcon(Icon(rawValue: iconName))
}

Of course, this will not give you the convenience of auto-complete (unless you define additional constants in the objective-c environment).

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