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I'm sure there's a simple solution to this, but I can't figure it out!! Suppose I have a dataframe that has the following information:

aaa<-c("A,B","B,C","B,D,E")
vvv<-c("101","101,102","102,103,104")
data_h<-data.frame(aaa,vvv)
data_h
    aaa         vvv
1   A,B         101
2   B,C     101,102
3 B,D,E 102,103,104

Desired output is a frequency map of individual hits, for subsequent analysis in a heat map. So:

  101   102   103   104
A  1     0     0     0
B  2     2     1     1
C  1     1     0     0
D  0     1     1     1
E  0     1     1     1

How do I make this transformation? I've seen many similar examples, but none where the contents of the data-frame need to be parsed.

The goal is to ultimately use heatmap or something similar on the output table to visualize the correlation between "aaa" and "vvv".

share|improve this question
    
I have a question? in first row only 101 is there still it was mapped with B, but next two rows have specifically mapped with aaa and vvv... How to go about this... – vrajs5 Jun 10 '14 at 12:43
    
I'm sorry I don't understand... what's the question? – Amit Kohli Jun 10 '14 at 13:27
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Here is a base R solution in 4 lines of code. First we define a function, spl which splits the components of a comma separated string producing a vector of all the fields. eg takes two string arguments and applies spl to each of them and then creates a grid of the result of the splitting. Finally we apply eg to each row of data_h, rbind the results together and tabulate them with xtabs:

spl <- function(x) strsplit(as.character(x), ",")[[1]]
eg <- function(aaa, vvv) expand.grid(aaa = spl(aaa), vvv = spl(vvv))
dd <- do.call("rbind", Map(eg, data_h$aaa, data_h$vvv))
xtabs(data = dd)

The result is:

   vvv
aaa 101 102 103 104
  A   1   0   0   0
  B   2   2   1   1
  C   1   1   0   0
  D   0   1   1   1
  E   0   1   1   1

dcast Alternately replace the last line of code above (the one with the xtabs) with:

library(reshape2)
dcast(dd, aaa ~ vvv, fun = length, value.var = "vvv")

in which case the result is:

  aaa 101 102 103 104
1   A   1   0   0   0
2   B   2   2   1   1
3   C   1   1   0   0
4   D   0   1   1   1
5   E   0   1   1   1

tapply. Another alternative would be tapply (however, it will fill in empty cells with NA rather than 0):

tapply(1:nrow(dd), dd, length)

ADDED Alternatives. Some improvements.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 cool solution man. I like the use of xtabs here. – Simon O'Hanlon Jun 10 '14 at 13:28
    
This near about kills my computer processing, but works also! Unfortunately, gives a different answer than splitstackshape solution above... trying the edit. – Amit Kohli Jun 10 '14 at 13:31
    
I am not sure what you mean by "unfortunately". This gives the answer asked for in the question. – G. Grothendieck Jun 10 '14 at 13:37
    
@AmitKohli, I also don't understand your use of "unfortunately" in your comment. – Ananda Mahto Jun 10 '14 at 13:42
    
Have added an alternative to xtabs in case its faster. – G. Grothendieck Jun 10 '14 at 13:43

My concat.split.multiple function is in great need of a rewrite to improve its efficiency. I've done some work on that in my cSplit function, which might be useful if you have a particularly large dataset.

Here's how I would solve your given problem with cSplit:

table(
  cSplit(
    cSplit(data_h, splitCols = 2, sep = ",", 
           direction = "long", makeEqual = FALSE), 
    splitCols = 1, sep = ",", direction = "long", 
    makeEqual = FALSE))
#    vvv
# aaa 101 102 103 104
#   A   1   0   0   0
#   B   2   2   1   1
#   C   1   1   0   0
#   D   0   1   1   1
#   E   0   1   1   1

It seems to be pretty efficient too...

First, the functions to test:

fun1 <- function() table(cSplit(cSplit(df, 2, ",", "long", FALSE), 1, ",", "long", FALSE))

fun2 <- function() {
  spl <- function(x) strsplit(as.character(x), ",")[[1]]
  eg <- function(aaa, vvv) expand.grid(aaa = spl(aaa), vvv = spl(vvv))
  dd <- do.call("rbind", Map(eg, df$A, df$V))
  xtabs(data = dd)
}

Second, some sample data. Change Nrows and re-generate to see the effect on different sized data.frames.

set.seed(1)
Nrow <- 100
aaa <- 100:200
vvv <- LETTERS
maxA <- 10
maxV <- 10
Aaa <- sample(maxA, Nrow, TRUE)
Vvv <- sample(maxV, Nrow, TRUE)
A <- vapply(seq_along(Aaa), function(x) 
  paste(sample(aaa, Aaa[x], TRUE), collapse = ","), character(1L))
V <- vapply(seq_along(Vvv), function(x) 
  paste(sample(vvv, Vvv[x], TRUE), collapse = ","), character(1L))
df <- data.frame(A, V)
head(df)
#                                         A                   V
# 1                             127,122,152       E,E,O,S,W,S,M
# 2                         127,118,152,156             V,A,Z,Q
# 3                 113,125,172,197,110,177               L,A,T
# 4 195,182,131,165,196,196,134,126,116,132 F,Z,X,S,T,M,W,E,Q,H
# 5                             151,193,151       L,B,E,B,Y,I,N
# 6     126,104,142,186,135,113,137,163,139               Q,G,N

Compare the two approaches to make sure the results are the same:

X <- fun1()
Y <- fun2()
all(X == Y[dimnames(X)[[1]], dimnames(X)[[2]]])
# [1] TRUE

Benchmark (on 100 rows).

library(microbenchmark)
## Nrow = 100
microbenchmark(fun1(), fun2(), times = 10)
# Unit: milliseconds
#    expr       min        lq    median        uq      max neval
#  fun1()  7.263802  7.326237  7.440843  7.868905 10.26451    10
#  fun2() 62.869130 64.046836 68.525880 73.595061 80.02027    10

Benchmark (on 1000 rows).

## Nrow = 1000
microbenchmark(fun1(), fun2(), times = 10)
# Unit: milliseconds
#    expr      min        lq    median        uq       max neval
#  fun1()  19.2303  20.21857  23.14337  26.97776  35.56338    10
#  fun2() 775.6586 815.01639 835.98951 852.47804 888.15345    10
share|improve this answer

The shape of the data.frame suggests using splitstackshape package. But I don't know very well this package so I just use it to reshape the data, and then compute frequencies by hand using table:

library(splitstackshape)
data_h_split <- concat.split.multiple(data_h,1:2)

# aaa_1 aaa_2 aaa_3 vvv_1 vvv_2 vvv_3
# 1     A     B  <NA>   101    NA    NA
# 2     B     C  <NA>   101   102    NA
# 3     B     D     E   102   103   104

Once you have the data in this format (no comma , regular columns), it is easy to compute frequencies using table( you can use tapply,reshape):

table(cbind.data.frame(ff= unlist(data_h_split[1:3]),
                       xx= unlist(data_h_split[4:6])))
   xx
ff  101 102 103 104
  A   1   0   0   0
  B   1   1   0   0
  C   0   1   0   0
  D   0   0   1   0
      0   0   0   0
  E   0   0   0   1

Ananda's edit

Here's a multi-step approach to get the result using "splitstackshape" to work for this.

library(splitstackshape)

## Split the "vvv" column first, and reshape at the same time
x <- concat.split.multiple(data_h, split.cols="vvv", ",", "long")

## Add an ID column
x$id <- 1:nrow(x)

## Split the "aaa" column next, again reshaping as we do so
x <- concat.split.multiple(x[complete.cases(x), ], split.cols="aaa", ",", "long")

## Use `table` with `droplevels`
with(droplevels(x), table(aaa, vvv))
#    vvv
# aaa 101 102 103 104
#   A   1   0   0   0
#   B   2   2   1   1
#   C   1   1   0   0
#   D   0   1   1   1
#   E   0   1   1   1
share|improve this answer
    
This definitely works... I'm holding off on marking as solved because it's not very extrapolatable because in my application, I needed to find out that the columns were [1:208] and [209:416]... but thanks and good job! – Amit Kohli Jun 10 '14 at 13:21
1  
@AmitKohli, if the columns are named similarly, can't you just use grep with the column names? – Ananda Mahto Jun 10 '14 at 13:23
    
@AnandaMahto thanks for the edit. I don't mind any edit :) you are always welcome. – agstudy Jun 10 '14 at 13:49
    
Can't reproduce your edit Ananda... it freezes my computer when I try it with my real data (but my computer isn't great... so it's probably not your code). Regarding your comment, what would you like me to grep? – Amit Kohli Jun 10 '14 at 13:55
    
@AmitKohli, Check out the results I've posted at this answer: stackoverflow.com/a/24146951/1270695 – Ananda Mahto Jun 10 '14 at 17:12

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