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I want to get the content of the 500 error: neither appears to let me do so, exceptions are thrown:

using(var wc = new WebClient()){
    wc.DownloadString(address).Dump();
}
using(var wc = new HttpClient())
{
    var result = await wc.GetStringAsync(address);
    result.Dump();
}

and yes address is a valid address "http://foo.azurewebsites.net/Account/Login" and I have tried them each individually.

How do I read the content/response of the 500 error from the asp.net site?

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What do you mean by "neither appears to let me do so"? what have you tried to do? –  Yuval Itzchakov Jun 10 '14 at 13:35
    
The method DownloadString returns a String, can't you just put that in a variable? –  Mez Jun 10 '14 at 13:37
    
@Mez Looks like he's using LinqPad; it's a very useful tool for running code snippets to experiment with a bit of code. –  simon at rcl Jun 10 '14 at 16:44
    
@Mez not when it is an exception that isn't being caught, I imagine the proposed answer is correct, need to try it. –  Maslow Jun 10 '14 at 19:16
    
@simonatrcl indeed –  Maslow Jun 10 '14 at 19:25

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

A WebException has a Response property. It works like any other response. You can read its contents and the exact status code.

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is there a non try-catch option for doing this? –  Maslow Jun 10 '14 at 19:33
    
With WebClient, no. I wish there was. I don't know for HttpClient. –  usr Jun 10 '14 at 22:26

This shows the rest of the details of how you might read the Response property usr referred to

void Main()
{
    try
    {           
        using(var wc = new WebClient()){
            wc.DownloadString(Util.ReadLine("sitename?")).Dump("success");
        }
    }
    catch (WebException ex)
    {
        string response;
        using(var stream=ex.Response.GetResponseStream())
        using(var sr = new StreamReader(stream))
        {
            response=sr.ReadToEnd();
        }
        response.Dump("error");
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
why not edit the other answer? –  jgauffin Jun 10 '14 at 21:02
    
@jgauffin idk, haven't spent time on meta to figure out which is most appropriate. –  Maslow Jun 10 '14 at 21:16
    
ShareAlike license allows anyone to make improvements of existing answers. Easier for other readers. –  jgauffin Jun 10 '14 at 21:28

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