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I have a matrix of this form:

a b c
d e 0
f 0 0

and I want to transform it into something like this:

a b c
0 d e
0 0 f

The shifting pattern is this:

shift by 0 for row 1
shift by 1 for row 2
shift by 2 for row 3
...
shift by n-1 for row n

This can be done with a for loop of course. I am wondering if there is a better way?

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I'm not sure I understand what is the shifting pattern here –  David Arenburg Jun 10 at 14:49
    
I have edited the question –  qed Jun 10 at 14:59

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Assuming that your example is representative, i.e., you have always a triangle structure of letters and zeros:

mat <- structure(c("a", "d", "f", "b", "e", "0", "c", "0", "0"), 
                 .Dim = c(3L, 3L), .Dimnames = list(NULL, NULL))
res <- matrix(0, nrow(mat), ncol(mat))
res[lower.tri(res, diag=TRUE)] <- t(mat)[t(mat)!="0"]
t(res)
#     [,1] [,2] [,3]
# [1,] "a"  "b"  "c" 
# [2,] "0"  "d"  "e" 
# [3,] "0"  "0"  "f" 
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Risky assumption! –  Carl Witthoft Jun 10 at 15:26
    
@CarlWitthoft Sure. But it avoids loops and should be quite efficient, so I thought I'd share this option. If the OP shows data that is not representative, that's not my fault. –  Roland Jun 10 at 15:29
    
+1 I think this solution is very clever if the assumptions are met. –  Simon O'Hanlon Jun 10 at 15:30

I think this is all you need:

 mat<-matrix(1:25,5)
 mat
     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5]
[1,]    1    6   11   16   21
[2,]    2    7   12   17   22
[3,]    3    8   13   18   23
[4,]    4    9   14   19   24
[5,]    5   10   15   20   25
 for(j in 2:nrow(mat) ) mat[j,]<-mat[j, c(j:ncol(mat),1:(j-1))]
 mat
     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5]
[1,]    1    6   11   16   21
[2,]    7   12   17   22    2
[3,]   13   18   23    3    8
[4,]   19   24    4    9   14
[5,]   25    5   10   15   20
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Are you sure? This didn't quite seem to work for me. –  Simon O'Hanlon Jun 10 at 15:20
    
@SimonO'Hanlon what, me test code? Sorry -- I'll go back and fix this. –  Carl Witthoft Jun 10 at 15:21
    
Almost! You seem to be left-shifting and the OP is right-shifting. –  Simon O'Hanlon Jun 10 at 15:28
    
@SimonO'Hanlon right you are. But given his selection of answer, apparently what he actually wanted was to push the "0" entries around. So I'll just leave this as an example for people who want to do other things :-) –  Carl Witthoft Jun 10 at 16:03

A head and tail solution doesn't seem as readable as a for loop to me, and may not even be as quick. Nonetheless...

t( sapply( 0:(nrow(mat)-1) , function(x) c( tail( mat[x+1,] , x ) , head( mat[x+1,] , nrow(mat)-x ) ) ) )
#     [,1] [,2] [,3]
#[1,] "a"  "b"  "c" 
#[2,] "0"  "d"  "e" 
#[3,] "0"  "0"  "f" 

A for loop version of this could be...

n <- nrow(mat)
for( i in 1:n ){
    mat[i,] <- c( tail( mat[i,] , i-1 ) , head( mat[i,] , n-(i-1)  ) )
}
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